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Author Topic: First QSO question.  (Read 8479 times)
KD5TXX
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Posts: 82




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« on: December 19, 2013, 05:54:23 PM »

I feel like I'm ready for a slow 5 wmp QSO.  So my question is, I form the letters faster than I coppy words... For instance I can probably send letters at 12 wmp but copy words at 5 wmp.  I hear everyone say not to send faster than you copy.  I agree.  So should I slow down my letters or just space the letters out?  This sounds dumb but I want to know proper etiquette. 

Thanks
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WD8KNI
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Posts: 154




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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2013, 07:04:11 PM »

At slow speeds it doesn't make much difference.  As you progress remember:  Farnsworth is for learning not for sending.  Its tough on some of us to force us to determine word spacing..  I hear exactly what you are talking about on slow speed.  Just slow the whole thing down and learn and use proper dit/da, inter-character, inter-word spacing.  Its hard to unlearn something you learned wrong..

FWIW...  just get on the air, tell us what band and approximately what frequency you will be so we can look for you... Fred
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1821




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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2013, 06:48:55 AM »

Sounds like your ready to experience the traditional first contact jitters. As stated above just jump in there and do your thing, if you lose it all and just leave everything hanging as we all have don't feel guilty or bad about it because the other guy will know your just starting out and will be sitting there  with a grin on his face after he lost you remembering his first time out. Of course if your really lucky another fist timer will be on the other end and you can both spend half your QSO time sending "please repeat again" and that's where it really becomes fun and relaxing. Go for it, it will all come together soon enough.
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KB3TXH
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Posts: 47




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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2013, 08:00:40 AM »

I believe that sending understandable code, is most important. So if you feel that you send better code at a fast letter speed, then do that, and keep enough space between letters, and words to
to maintain your comfortable receiving rate. Because they will respond at the speed you send (or faster sometimes).

However, I find that I send better code if I don't try to send at my highest receiving speed, about 12-15 wpm.

Most important of all is.....get on the air. There are a lot of hams  just looking for a slow code QSO. I really miss the old novice bands.


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WB2WIK
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Posts: 20666




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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2013, 08:37:32 AM »

I really miss the old novice bands.




There's one that's sorta still there, the space from 7100 to 7125 kHz.  Seems to be mostly slow-coders and everybody's happy no matter what speed you use.
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KE6EE
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Posts: 454




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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2013, 01:23:33 PM »

Lots of jitters before. Incredible intensity when your call is returned. Key jumping out of your hand while you send. Your whole arm exhausted. Copying a lot easier than you thought but you can hardly write down what is sent. It's so intense you can't wait for it to be over.

When it's over you feel really great.
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2E0OZI
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Posts: 270




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« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2013, 01:59:26 PM »

I second everything said here - I was sweating like mad my hand nearly slipped off the key. Before you "do the big one"

1. Get comfy.
2. Go to the loo - don't want to be needing to "go"
3. Get plenty of paper and 3 pens. Make it 4.
4. Have fun.
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Men can only be happy when they do not assume that the object of life is happiness.
George Orwell
WX2S
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Posts: 759




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« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2013, 04:20:30 PM »

1. Spin the dial and look for someone sending CQ at a speed you can copy.
2. Answer them.
3. Repeat 1 and 2 until someone calls you back.

Took me 2 days as a novice before I made my first contact.

- WX2S.
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73, - Steve WX2S.
I subscribe to the DX Code of Conduct. http://dx-code.org/
N9GXA
Member

Posts: 119




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« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2013, 06:52:43 PM »

I believe that sending understandable code, is most important. So if you feel that you send better code at a fast letter speed, then do that, and keep enough

Hey Jim - Thanks for the QSO earlier and for putting up with my code.
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NO2A
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Posts: 843




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« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2013, 07:31:09 PM »

I really miss the old novice bands.



Don`t we all! If you ever work 80m,3550 is a good area to call cq.
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KB1WSY
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Posts: 813




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« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2013, 07:01:20 AM »

There's one that's sorta still there, the space from 7100 to 7125 kHz.  Seems to be mostly slow-coders and everybody's happy no matter what speed you use.

After reading your post, I checked the 7100-7125 segment over the past day or so, but it was all SSB. Probably a function of conditions, and my primitive equipment -- I will keep checking.

What I have found is a "slow-coder, friendly" CW area right around 7050. One of those slow-coders on 7051 (probably around 8wpm) had been "ON AIR FR 59 YRS" and was wishing a "VY MERRY" something to his equally relaxed slow-coder buddy. It must have been "XMAS" but I haven't learned the letter "X" yet, got flustered, and missed the whole word ... even at 8wpm.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
« Last Edit: December 21, 2013, 07:04:16 AM by KB1WSY » Logged
M0LEP
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Posts: 220




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« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2013, 08:05:19 AM »

It's so intense you can't wait for it to be over.

When it's over you feel really great.

...or else it takes you half an hour to settle down and stop feeling sick. I still end up with the shakes after a Morse QSO, even though all mine so far have been minimal callsign and signal report exchanges. Maybe it'll be less stressful when I've worked a few hundred, but at the moment I can only cope with a few a week.

73, Rick M0LEP
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K8AXW
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Posts: 4001




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« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2013, 08:24:00 AM »

You should remember one thing...... if you send fast, the receiving OP will think this is also your copy speed and will respond accordingly!!  That can ruin your day!

You ALWAYS match your sending speed to your copy speed.  This also includes trying to keep proper spacing of words and character elements for that speed. This last part reeaally isn't that critical to execute a QSO though.

I found this to be true before I became a ham.  I could send fast with a key and oscillator but when it came to copying the code I was lost.  When the Army finished with me I could copy more than twice my sending speed! Later when I became licensed I found that stations invariably responded to my calls at MY sending speed.

It then became a quick process to learn faster sending to compliment my ability to copy. 


Al  - K8AXW
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M0LEP
Member

Posts: 220




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« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2013, 08:47:01 AM »

You ALWAYS match your sending speed to your copy speed.

...and try to allow for the nerves that seem to come with a live QSO taking a few notches off your copying speed.

Oh, and having a couple of military jets do a low pass at speed while you're mid-QSO (as happened to me today) sure doesn't help, either... Wink
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2836




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« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2013, 11:13:14 AM »

You ALWAYS match your sending speed to your copy speed.

...and try to allow for the nerves that seem to come with a live QSO taking a few notches off your copying speed.

Oh, and having a couple of military jets do a low pass at speed while you're mid-QSO (as happened to me today) sure doesn't help, either... Wink

How about having military jets being catapulted off an aircraft carrier just 8 feet or so above your head?  Grin Grin  First couple times it's scary.  After that, meh.  You can send, copy, or even sleep through it.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
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