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Author Topic: Net Control Station Callsign(s)  (Read 18026 times)
KK4LGR
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Posts: 74




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« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2014, 05:05:02 AM »

It makes sense in that context.  I kind of hope ARES hams aren't put in that kind of position.  Quite a few of us aren't trained for first responder-type work.  Since we hams should be communicating with other hams and not inter-service, I don't see a clear reason to settle on one or the other.  If we've got aviators, soldiers and LEOs all working ARES, I would suggest adding procedure words like "this is" or "Calling."  "Supply calling net control" or "Net control, this is supply."  I'll give up a tiny bit of brevity to get a whole lot of clarity.
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"Well I'm sure glad we've got these ham radios to talk on."
--Unidentified station heard on 2 meters
KB8VUL
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Posts: 200




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« Reply #16 on: January 08, 2014, 05:19:17 PM »

well, this might have been said in the past two pages but topics like this tend to go in circles so I don't read them.
One option if you have a club is to use the club call for the Net Control like the weather nets typically do.

I believe that club calls are sort of special events calls as well and the rules are similar.   I would look into it, but it would simplify things for you. 

If you have a good relationship with the served agency and have diesrt access to their radio system then a call or ARES net control, so that officers and responders know who they are communicating with.
This of course only applies if you have behaved yourselves and have not been relegated to a bathroom stall with a plugged toilet to operate from.
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W9FIB
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« Reply #17 on: January 08, 2014, 07:12:56 PM »


This of course only applies if you have behaved yourselves and have not been relegated to a bathroom stall with a plugged toilet to operate from.

Or some windowless closet that they shut the door and hide you away! Cheesy
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Happy being an Amateur Extra!
Nothing says CB on my printed license.
Ares/Races but no lights or crown vic.
KB1QBZ
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2014, 08:21:42 AM »

It makes sense in that context.  I kind of hope ARES hams aren't put in that kind of position.  Quite a few of us aren't trained for first responder-type work.

Where I am, ALL communications work is done through CERT, not ARES.  That's true for both local stuff (backup comms for Red Cross, backup Comms for the shelter) and regional communications (to Red Cross state offices, to the regional EOC).  Since we're in CERT, any of us may be called upon to communicate directly with first-responders.  In practice, communications between CERT and first responders is usually given to one of our CERT hams, as are pure communications tasks (e.g., shelter communications).  For example, on our last SAR the CERT search teams were talking to a CERT net control who was a ham.  The CERT net control/ham was talking over police radio to the incident commander (a police lieutenant).  However, when one of the CERT teams happened to be the team to find the victim, that team (which had no hams) was put in direct radio contact with fire/EMS to facilitate getting the first responders to the victim.

For both CERT and ham public service, we always use tactical call signs because it gives immediate context to the call - if someone with a tactical call sign of "North Parking Lot" is calling you, you know where they are and what they're talking about.  Also, it doesn't matter who is calling from "North Parking Lot" and you don't have to start trying to figure out where KB1QBZ is assigned when he calls in.  Using call signs becomes even more confusing when people get re-assigned or go off shift.  For example, KB1QBZ was at North Parking Lot for a few hours, but was just re-assigned to the West Parking Lot.  When KB1QBZ calls in and tells you "we have room for three more cars", I can guarantee you that you're going to send the cars to the North Parking Lot.  If instead "West Parking Lot" calls in and tells you "we have room for three more cars", you are very likely to send the cars to the correct parking lot.

For example, when doing ham radio support for a charity bike ride, net control has the call sign "[event name] net" (e.g., "Bennett Net").  Teams at fixed locations have a call sign of [location name] + [job] (e.g., "Harvey School Rest").  Mobile units have call signs based on their assignment (e.g., "North Loop SAG").  If a mobile unit has free run of the area, then we give them a call sign based on their vehicle (e.g., if Dave's Cycle has provided the SAG, then their call sign would be "Dave SAG").

We use the same basic approach with CERT operations - and in fact the EOC requires we do it that way.  If we're operating on the ham bands, then we do also throw in our call sign at the end of each "QSO" (but not at the end of each transmission).

>>I'll give up a tiny bit of brevity to get a whole lot of clarity.

AMEN to that!!


Jon, WB2RYV (formerly KB1QBZ)
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N0IU
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Posts: 2005


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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2014, 03:47:45 AM »

Also, it doesn't matter who is calling from "North Parking Lot" and you don't have to start trying to figure out where KB1QBZ is assigned when he calls in.

But it does matter to the FCC. Part 97 requires us to use our callsign (or that of a duly designated control operator) to identify ourselves. At some point in time, a callsign must be used.
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KB1QBZ
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Posts: 44




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« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2014, 08:34:24 PM »

But it does matter to the FCC. Part 97 requires us to use our callsign (or that of a duly designated control operator) to identify ourselves. At some point in time, a callsign must be used.

And as I said in my post

"If we're operating on the ham bands, then we do also throw in our call sign at the end of each "QSO" (but not at the end of each transmission)."

FCC regs require identification every 10 minutes and at the end of a communication (essentially, at the end of a QSO).  That's what we do.

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