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Author Topic: Comments about (seemingly) endless CQs.  (Read 5254 times)
KF7ATL
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Posts: 69




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« on: December 17, 2014, 07:46:56 PM »

Tonight I heard a fellow on 40m calling CQ. He called 10 or 15 times before signing, then went right back to calling, leaving only a few seconds for anyone to answer. This seems to occur fairly frequently on the bands that I listen to. I can't speak for everyone, but for me this is a big turn-off. When I hear someone doing that I get tired of waiting and move on. Here is my 2 cents, for what it's worth: Use the standard 3x2 call (CQ CQ CQ de K7XYZ K7XYZ K) then wait and listen 20 for seconds or so. If no one answers, call again. Repeat as needed. I suspect that if you do that there will be many more ops willing to answer your call.

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NO2A
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Posts: 906




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« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2014, 08:08:18 PM »

I think that`s true for 90% of calling cq. The only exceptions are for a weak band opening or when it`s 3 am. It`s also good to use your r.i.t. as sometimes a station will call you who is slightly off your listening frequency.
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VK6IS
Member

Posts: 182




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« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2014, 09:00:11 PM »

it's quite common to hear that type of CQ. ..

- typically it's a 3x3 CQ,, listen for 1s,, repeat ..
& endlessly repeated. - at a high speed - too.

- tend to assume that the OP is using either a PC or an encoder to send the call.
but- they are definitely *not* listening.
  Roll Eyes

yes - it's always a possibility that the OP didn't hear my return call,
but - they didn't allow much gap in their TX - either.
 Sad

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K8AXW
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Posts: 4584




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« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2014, 09:33:46 AM »

This complaint along with other poor operating practices have been going on for 100 years!

The answer or reason inevitably settles down to one thing.  Ignorance.

Poor operating practices have never been eliminated during the past 100 years so no point in concerning one's self now.  Life is too short to sweat the nonsense.  Turn the knob!!  (Don'tcha just love VFOs?)   Grin

Merry Christmas.

 
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NI0C
Member

Posts: 2517




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« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2014, 12:39:05 PM »

I've suspected recently that some folks calling CQ are not really seeking a QSO, but rather checking out their signal reports on the "Reverse Beacon Network," or even on the DX clusters.

However, as K8AXW said, the obnoxious practice of too many CQ's followed by too few repetitions of the call sign and/or not enough time for listening for an answer has been going on for decades.  I can think of some good "Hatlo's Inferno" punishments for these guys!

73,
Chuck  NI0C
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K0OD
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Posts: 2688




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« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2014, 01:27:21 PM »

NI0C: "I've suspected recently that some folks calling CQ are not really seeking a QSO, but rather checking out their signal reports on the "Reverse Beacon Network," or even on the DX clusters."

Good point Charlie. I often do that on channel 5 on 60-meter CW. But typically I'll only call 2 or maybe 3 CQs to see how the RBN reads me outside the US. If I get nothing from EU, I'll QRT. If the EU RBN reports are strong I'll check back from time to time, or monitor 5403.5 from my work desk nearby.  
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NI0C
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Posts: 2517




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« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2014, 07:04:46 PM »

NI0C: "I've suspected recently that some folks calling CQ are not really seeking a QSO, but rather checking out their signal reports on the "Reverse Beacon Network," or even on the DX clusters."

Good point Charlie. I often do that on channel 5 on 60-meter CW. But typically I'll only call 2 or maybe 3 CQs to see how the RBN reads me outside the US. If I get nothing from EU, I'll QRT. If the EU RBN reports are strong I'll check back from time to time, or monitor 5403.5 from my work desk nearby.  

Nothing at all wrong with using the RBN's; of course people calling CQ have a responsibilty to listen for any callers and answer them with at least a signal report.

Cheers,
Chuck  NI0C
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N3PDT
Member

Posts: 77




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« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2014, 10:05:53 PM »

I've suspected recently that some folks calling CQ are not really seeking a QSO, but rather checking out their signal reports on the "Reverse Beacon Network," or even on the DX clusters.

73,
Chuck  NI0C

No doubt that's some of it Chuck, but I tend to agree with others, that it's poor operating in most cases.

For checking propagation of one's own signal with RBN, just send TEST instead of CQ, eg. TEST TEST N3PDT N3PDT AR. RBN skimmers hear the call twice and report a CQ. Other ops hear the test message and no invitation to call.

Doug N3PDT
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N8XI
Member

Posts: 242




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« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2014, 06:45:42 AM »

I don't think it is a checking signals via RBN thing.
It is just recent (15 years ?) poor practice.

There are not many "elmers" that pass on Amateur Radio operating procedure.
Too few hams research proper procedure nor do many care anymore.

That is pretty much the norm for society today.
Example of several:
I have seen a lot drivers edge the front of their car (or further) over that
really big white line at traffic stops. I say why waste the white paint!!

When I received my Novice License, in the 1960's I received a free booklet
from the ARRL called "Operating an Amateur Radio Station".

It is a very handy little publication.
I still have it!

Yea, the chaining of multiple CQ's is akin to saying 73's.
Chaining CQ's = I am practicing my C & Q characters.
I say, why waste my time!!
73's = Best Regards'es

In the meantime have fun and enjoy Ham Radio
Seventy Three, NO S, if you please!

Rick - N8XI
« Last Edit: December 19, 2014, 06:47:54 AM by N8XI » Logged
NI0C
Member

Posts: 2517




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« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2014, 08:36:47 AM »

I never said that the problem presented by the OP was entirely caused by people using the RBN to check signals.  I merely posed that as one possibility.  There is seldom a single answer to problems with human behavior.

Perhaps the best way to learn about proper CQ'ing is by the experience of answering the CQ's of others.  Experience for yourself the frustration of listening to a weak CQ by a DX station and trying to capture a call sign when it is sent only once or twice after a nauseous number of CQ's. 

A good rule for all operating practices is to put yourself in the place of the listener.  Make it easy for him/her to copy you and everybody will be happier.



73,
Chuck

 
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N3QE
Member

Posts: 3021




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« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2014, 09:41:33 AM »

I don't think it was reversebeacon testing. Any given reversebeacon skimmer will only spot you at most once every 10 minutes. (If you QSY you can get a new spot sooner).

Most likely explanation is his keyer has a CQ memory and the cat was sitting on the button for it.

I'm all for listening after the CQ, but 20 seconds is too long to wait for a reply to a CQ. Even on topband where you might be cycling between receive antennas after each CQ.

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AA4N
Member

Posts: 124




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« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2014, 07:03:16 AM »

Yes, I find the endless CQ thing a bit irritating.   Generally, if I hear more than 4 CQ's or the op can't/won't send his/her call sign properly, I just move on.   I guess I'm just becoming a grumpy OM.

73 mike
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NV2A
Member

Posts: 174




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« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2014, 07:27:24 AM »

How many stations looking for a qso tune right by and well out of their pass band if you wait 20 seconds?  Waiting 4-5 seconds means a guy can be tuning past you but you will still be in his pass band if you start up again after he has passed you.

I don't like the new RTTY way of making 4 second calls.  I still like one string of RY's and then the call.

But I'm a Boomer (60's era ham)
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NV2A
Member

Posts: 174




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« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2014, 10:11:34 AM »

I should have added, many of us older guys were told when we were younger the sure way to get an answer to a CQ was to call for a long time to give guys a chance to discover you.
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ZENKI
Member

Posts: 1107




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« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2014, 09:50:05 PM »

Forget about the endless CQ. The OP is doing the right thing by calling CQ. We need more people calling CQ'ing rather than spinning the dial or monitoring the cluster.
The bands are dead because hams cant be bothered calling CQ or replying to those calling CQ. If you hear a dead band or nothing calling CQ.

Even these days before I call CQ i send a series of V's maritime style. Its amazing how many op's come back and say whats this crap. But if I call CQ they dont even bother replying.
Its seems policing has moved down to the CW bands where old ops are more content with intimidating  CW ops rather than having a CQ or QSO.  None of the old novices today  would be good CW ops if it was not for the learning period and  just being  on the air everyday making contacts. You certainly dont become a good CW op by being a armchair commando or   helping other CW ops by being arrogant and a nasty policeman.

The CW bands need a  lot of slack cut for new operators so they can learn the right ways. You dont encourage people by being a constant mindless nitpicker.
Eventually everyone comes around and operates the same as everyone else. CW operating becomes very conformist.

The ops who annoy me are those CW keyboard ops who cant be bothered to send the prosign BT correctly, its not B T. Its a dead giveaway by the newbies on the keyboard.
How hard is it to use a function key for BT?

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