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Author Topic: Is it worth the time and trouble...?  (Read 8058 times)
K2CPO
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Posts: 43




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« on: December 28, 2013, 05:12:29 PM »

... to apply for a 1x2 call-sign? I know they're very difficult to get. Just curious, as I'm now posted Amateur Extra on the FCC!

Thanks, for any thoughts!

Kim
KD0WDL
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W3HF
Member

Posts: 700


WWW

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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2013, 07:32:46 PM »

It really all depends on how you operate. If you are a serious contester, then a shorter callsign is an advantage. But if you're into CW contesting, you may be able to find a 2x2 or 1x3 that's even shorter than many of the 1x2s or 2x1s. For DXing, there may not be much of a difference.

An advantage of 2x2s and 1x3s is that there are many more available, so you should have more choices. With 1x2s, you'll have to take what you can get.

Only you can decide how much it's worth to you, in terms of effort and cost. Some (including myself) consider it worth it, but many others do not. Then again, I got mine over 13 years ago, when it wasn't nearly as difficult as it is now.
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K2CPO
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Posts: 43




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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2013, 08:20:15 PM »

It really all depends on how you operate. If you are a serious contester, then a shorter callsign is an advantage. But if you're into CW contesting, you may be able to find a 2x2 or 1x3 that's even shorter than many of the 1x2s or 2x1s. For DXing, there may not be much of a difference.

An advantage of 2x2s and 1x3s is that there are many more available, so you should have more choices. With 1x2s, you'll have to take what you can get.

Only you can decide how much it's worth to you, in terms of effort and cost. Some (including myself) consider it worth it, but many others do not. Then again, I got mine over 13 years ago, when it wasn't nearly as difficult as it is now.

Thanks for your thoughts!

I'm kinda' liking my "automatically assigned" call sign. While studying for Extra, I kept telling myself that as a "treat" for passing, I would get a vanity call sign.

Contesting... this just doesn't appeal to me. It might, in the future, but for now, it just doesn't. I'd rather chat with someone far away and get to know the person, not just log them in for points. So having a short call sign isn't a necessity. Just something I thought about while studying.

Anyway, thanks for your reply, W3HF. Guess the only reason to get a 1x2 is just to have it. No other reason. So I'm undecided. Thanks, again.
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N0IU
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Posts: 1374


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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2013, 06:40:01 AM »

I got my vanity call back in 1997, but it wasn't just because I wanted a shorter call just for the sake of having a shorter call.

I got my undergraduate degree from Indiana University. The school's club station's call sign is K9IU and I wanted KØIU, but unfortunately (for me!), the person that holds that call is still living so I "settled" for NØIU.

While it is a great call on CW because it is so short, it absolutely stinks on voice! The most common phonetic for "N" is November. The two most common phonetics for "I" are India and Italy. The two most common phonetics for "U" are Uniform and United. Each one of those is three syllables so when you add it up, that is nine syllables just to pronounce my callsign!

So when considering a vanity...





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K2CPO
Member

Posts: 43




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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2013, 07:47:56 AM »

That would make for a really interesting thread... "The worst call signs ever issued." *smile*
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WW7KE
Member

Posts: 86




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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2013, 02:00:22 PM »

I got my vanity call back in 1997, but it wasn't just because I wanted a shorter call just for the sake of having a shorter call.

I got my undergraduate degree from Indiana University. The school's club station's call sign is K9IU and I wanted KØIU, but unfortunately (for me!), the person that holds that call is still living so I "settled" for NØIU.

While it is a great call on CW because it is so short, it absolutely stinks on voice! The most common phonetic for "N" is November. The two most common phonetics for "I" are India and Italy. The two most common phonetics for "U" are Uniform and United. Each one of those is three syllables so when you add it up, that is nine syllables just to pronounce my callsign!

"Italy Uniform" is certainly shorter than "Indiana University." Grin

BTW, I'm also a former member of the IU ham club (1971-73), and spent many a weekend at good ol' "Kilowatt Nine Italy Uniform."  I wasn't a student at IU; my dad worked there, so I was eligible to join.  I was in high school at the time, as WB9EAZ.
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N0IU
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2013, 02:25:12 PM »

BTW, I'm also a former member of the IU ham club (1971-73), and spent many a weekend at good ol' "Kilowatt Nine Italy Uniform." 

As Maxwell Smart used to say...



"Missed it by that much!"

I went there from 1975 - 1979.
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HURRICAINE
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2013, 06:58:17 AM »

Contesting has practical applications.
If a person was to volunteer for public service work in an emergency such as a disaster or a tragedy - 911 comes to mind as being one.

In an emergency, everyone is screaming for something, and you have to be able to pick out one individual voice, call sign and problem.  Assess the problem and deal with it as it comes along.

Then move on to the next person, the whole time logging the event, ensuring that each individual piece of traffic is logged correctly.
Working at an aid station or shelter, you will have large lists of things needed such as medications that must be delivered immediately.  Lists of names of the people staying in the shelters and also problems that needs addressing such as a lack of food, clothing or beds.

Today, most of this can be handled by FlDigi and Packet.
A good working radio and antenna and a simple computer program and some interface cables and a lap top computer that doesn't even have to be hooked to the internet.

The vanity call sign program is a success because it allows amateurs that normally don't use their license or their call sign, to get a call sign that is also their initials or their name.

Those people tends to pay the bulk of the fees associated with maintaining the program. 

The contesters are a small minority of the population.   
Upwards of 65% of all licensee's are only a Technician Class license holder.
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N0IU
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Posts: 1374


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« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2013, 06:17:31 PM »

Upwards of 65% of all licensee's are only a Technician Class license holder.

Where did you get your figures or did you just make up a random number out of thin air?

As of November 13, 2012, there were 348,786 Technicians and a total of 716,672 total licensed amateurs which is about 48%. My source is: http://www.ah0a.org/FCC/Licenses.html

What is your source?
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K1OC
Member

Posts: 69




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« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2014, 08:12:44 PM »

If you like your current call sign, keep it until something you like better (for whatever reason) becomes available. There's no hurry. The only call sign I would have given up my originally-issued call for is the one I have now, and I was just very, very lucky in the vanity call lottery.

FWIW, I found it easier to bust pileups with my original, longer call.  I'd still be sending it after everyone else had unkeyed, and it had a distinctive suffix.  It's a little harder to find the right rhythm with my current call. But I think I'll keep it anyway.

And congrats on the upgrade!

73 de Tony K1OC ex KB1SUN


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N0JL
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2014, 07:13:27 PM »

It is really up to you.  I work mostly CW.  It is MUCH easier to send N0JL than WA0OTQ... and has been for 32 years.

73 de N0JL
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W9KEY
Member

Posts: 1165




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« Reply #11 on: January 07, 2014, 08:58:41 PM »

imo, 1 x 3's are worth consideration -- especially if you do CW.  My call for example is basically the same length wise as K9LM and shorter than K9LQ (in terms of CW weight).  I wanted the call to be in the 9 district (I live in Indiana and was first licensed in Illinois).  1 x 2's are hard to come by, but it also never hurts to apply for one of those if available...
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K7MEM
Member

Posts: 108


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« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2014, 04:12:07 AM »

I picked my 1x3 in 1999, before the dropping of the Morse requirements. I had just successfully tested for my Extra. I knew that the Morse requirements were going to be history very soon and there would be a lot of new Extras picking away at the pool of calls. So I put in for K7MEM, my initials. I included a couple of other possibilities, but my first choice was granted.

I didn't necessarily think about it at the time, but it is a great call for CW and SSB ("Kilo Seven Mike Echo Mike"). I don't recall anyone on CW or SSB getting my call wrong. For CW I could have shortened it, if I used a "N" instead of a "K", but that would have made the SSB phonics longer.
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Martin - K7MEM

http://www.k7mem.com
HURRICAINE
Member

Posts: 0




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« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2014, 06:35:17 AM »

Upwards of 65% of all licensee's are only a Technician Class license holder.

Where did you get your figures or did you just make up a random number out of thin air?

As of November 13, 2012, there were 348,786 Technicians and a total of 716,672 total licensed amateurs which is about 48%. My source is: http://www.ah0a.org/FCC/Licenses.html

What is your source?

ARRL

About 50,000 licenses are club call signs and contest clubs, which at one time was allowed to hold more then one call sign per a club.

Figure out how many General, Advanced and Amateur Extra class license holders are dead, but no one turned in their death certificate.

Subtract those numbers from the 715,000 licenses and then divide by 100 - since 715 minus 50,000 minus probably 75,000 = 125,000

716,672 - 125,000 = 591,672

It stands to reason that there are more people that holds a technician class license, and most of them are new hams or licensed less then 20 years, so more of them are probably still alive.

It stands to reason that a higher % of General and Advanced and Amateur Extra licensee's would be beyond retirement age and closer to their death bed then not.

In college they call this stuff Statistic's.

348,786 Technician class license holders,  if you have 325,000 living Technician class license holders and only 291,672 of all of the others, you have more then 50% that are technician class license holders.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2835




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« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2014, 05:22:40 PM »

Upwards of 65% of all licensee's are only a Technician Class license holder.

Where did you get your figures or did you just make up a random number out of thin air?

As of November 13, 2012, there were 348,786 Technicians and a total of 716,672 total licensed amateurs which is about 48%. My source is: http://www.ah0a.org/FCC/Licenses.html

What is your source?
In college they call this stuff Statistic's.

In grade school they teach you that you don't use an apostrophe to form a possessive.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
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