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Author Topic: HAS CB LIDS DESTROYED THE HAM BANDS?  (Read 17010 times)
KB1WSY
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Posts: 660




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« Reply #75 on: January 14, 2014, 05:24:25 AM »

I got my Technician license in July 2013 at 98%. Got my General license in October 2013 at 96%. Got my Extra license in December 2013 at 96%. I'm now learning CW. Why? Because it's tradition. Because it's something I want to know and be good at. Because I find it interesting, and I'm intrigued by it.

Funny, the VEs never told me my scores, but you're not the first ham who's quoted their own results, so I think it must be something that varies between one test site and another. I took the Tech and Gen tests in one sitting and after grading my paper, I heard one VE say to another, in a rather loud sotto voce, "someone in this room has a copy of the answer sheet." So I must have done OK. Learning Morse now; and that's much harder than the Tech/General tests were. I'll be gearing up for the Extra soon, and that, too, looks like it will be much easier than learning Morse.
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PA0KDW
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Posts: 15




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« Reply #76 on: January 14, 2014, 06:02:32 AM »

KB1WSY nice message.

I remember 70 years ago female operators were very scarse, so the guys were just like bees smelling honey to "work" them.
With "working" just is meant that you give RST mention the report  name es QTH and say good bye, with traditionally 88 which I didn't do ever, I always used 73.

And yes I always used CW. that was the way to establish far away contacts that were nearly impossible to get in another way and certainly not for free, important with a sparse budget. Transmitters were not for sale so we made our own equipment with radio parts. A 6L6 tube with a Xtal was enough to "work" the world.

Nowadays they need a "kit" in order to construct something. Look at a present concurrent thread here where they are looking for a kit with a tube. really amazing.

That is the reason that I admit: "CB Lids have destroyed the ham bands" Not that they know, they are just the tools in the hands of Japanese appliance  and kit manufacturers, to improve their income. They lobby in order to dumb down the requirements.

   Yes we, guys, have to get used to girls on motor bikes due to electric starter and to girls in ham radio due to dumbing down requirements, scratching code requirements,   and selling Japanese appliances and kits. A kit is like a frozen magnetron meal bought from your local grocery, warming it up to a complete meal has nothing to do whatever with cooking, so a kit not with  designing and building your own equipment.

So what buying an appliance, when with your computer, you can write and make contacts on this web site. You even meet me, and you can add Holland  on your dx  website based dx-honorlist.

Most of the guys here, I estimate over 90%, are proud they accomplished a simple examination.  They know nothing about designing your own equipment from available parts in a junk box.

Most of the CW guys learned the Morse code  compulsory because they signed for the service. Otherwise they should not have finished the task they planned to do. You will find hardly somebody that just thought like you AND DID IT ALSO. (LCWO learns that 95% of starters stop somewhere, but very fast after learning 6 or 8 characters)

BTW: look on the Internet for www.lcwo.net it had also a forum to contact other participants. Other good off line programs:
Just learn Morse Code (LB3KB) and finally G4FON look on google to download them.

73 Frans
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 06:25:15 AM by PA0KDW » Logged
NO2A
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Posts: 758




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« Reply #77 on: January 14, 2014, 11:17:19 AM »

If anything is "destroying" the bands,it`s this attitude of putting the hobby down. NOW MY RANT! GET ON THE BANDS AND HAVE A QSO BE IT SSB/CW/AM/RTTY/DIGITAL WHATEVER,AND STOP SAYING THE HOBBY IS DEAD! IF YOU DON`T LIKE HAM RADIO THEN GET OUT OF IT. STOP PUTTING DOWN PEOPLE WHO DO LIKE IT. OR I`M GONNA REACH THROUGH YOUR RADIO AND SMACK YOU! -Mike.
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1619




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« Reply #78 on: January 14, 2014, 12:24:58 PM »

Re: NO2A

OUCH, that hurt but well deserved. Wink
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KB1WSY
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Posts: 660




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« Reply #79 on: January 14, 2014, 12:51:17 PM »

I love ham radio. There's only one thing better in the world. I feel that way even though I'm not even on the air yet!

PA0KDW makes some good points, but coming back to the hobby after a 40-year gap, I notice far more similarities than differences.

Concerning the building of equipment. "Back then," if you could scrounge together the components from old TVs or whatever (rather than buying them from a store), you could actually build your own station for less money than the "equivalent" commercial gear and learn a lot while building. Nowadays, the economic equation is completely different. Homebrewing "equivalent" equipment to even the cheapest commercial gear is a real challenge, and almost always more expensive than buying commercial equipment. Which is why you see many homebrewers concentrating on the fun, relatively simple stuff like small QRP gear. Or, building accessories and antennas rather then entire rigs.

Each ham has his/her different motivations for getting into the hobby. My "angle" is building vintage ARRL designs from the 1950s/60s ... to each his thing.

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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KK4MRN
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Posts: 85




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« Reply #80 on: January 14, 2014, 01:44:29 PM »

I totally agree with Martin here.   I have been sourcing parts to build my QRP radios, and the parts are expensive.  It is so much easier just to buy a kit or an "appliance" as some old hams like to call commercial gear.   I think some of these old hams forget (no offense Martin! hi hi) that ham radio is a hobby -- something to spend your time and money to have fun - learn something along the way - and make some friends too.   When I find the people annoy me, I just turn the radio off.  I'm hear to have fun.    I've actually bought kits just to get the parts, but then I build it the way I want to build on my own board.  I don't use their pcboards they create.  I'm not at the level yet to home brew (design) my own equipment because I do not know enough about radio electronics.  I am learning still, and I do want to get to the point one day.  Yet, the only way you can gain experience for home brewing (designing) is to actually build radios.   Plus, I am learning CW too.  So, this goes well with me building my first transmitter since a CW transmitter is simpler than SSB.   I was listening to CW the other night and got so excited that I decided to plug my key in on 10 meters and pound my call sign.  Got no replies - that's OK.  I scratched my itch.  Maybe one day someone will reply.

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LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #81 on: January 14, 2014, 03:56:38 PM »

I got my Technician license in July 2013 at 98%. Got my General license in October 2013 at 96%.

That can't possibly be correct.


73
K4NL Sid
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AA4HA
Member

Posts: 1378




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« Reply #82 on: January 14, 2014, 05:03:53 PM »

I got my Technician license in July 2013 at 98%. Got my General license in October 2013 at 96%.

That can't possibly be correct.


73
K4NL Sid
35 question test;
1 wrong       97.1%
2 wrong       94.3%
3 wrong       91.4%

Extra points for spelling your name right.  Cheesy

Like the cologne from the movie "Ron Burgundy, Anchorman" "60% of the time it works every time".
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 05:06:27 PM by AA4HA » Logged

Ms. Tisha Hayes, AA4HA
Lookout Mountain, Alabama
W4KYR
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Posts: 474




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« Reply #83 on: January 14, 2014, 05:18:57 PM »

When I took my written tests, they would not tell me how many I got right or wrong. They did tell me how many I missed on the morse code part however. But this was back in the early 90's.
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LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #84 on: January 14, 2014, 05:41:48 PM »

When I took my written tests, they would not tell me how many I got right or wrong. They did tell me how many I missed on the morse code part however. But this was back in the early 90's.

According to the VE manual, "The VEs must inform the examinee of their grade (pass or fail, and offer his or her score {e.g., 26 out of 35}) upon completion of the grading."


73
K4NL Sid
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W4KVW
Member

Posts: 476




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« Reply #85 on: January 17, 2014, 07:07:58 PM »

I started in CB radio in 1965 at the age of 5 & Ham radio in 1994 & I still use BOTH but I don't have a Handle on Ham Radio just on the CB radio.I have managed to get most of my local friends into Ham Radio that I have spoken with for years on the CB & I'm giving another one a Technician Class study guide tomorrow so he can also join us.many of us still enjoy the CB band & when the language gets bad we just come back to a local repeater or get on 10 meters so we can talk locally.I know more bad Hams that should not be on any band than I do CB operators but when they get started I spin the VFO or change the band so they are not an issue! Any hobby has it's bad apples so you decide how to enjoy the hobby & the morons will continue being morons with or without you. {:>)   Grin   Cheesy   Wink

Clayton
W4KVW
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 474




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« Reply #86 on: January 18, 2014, 01:39:44 PM »

When I took my written tests, they would not tell me how many I got right or wrong. They did tell me how many I missed on the morse code part however. But this was back in the early 90's.

According to the VE manual, "The VEs must inform the examinee of their grade (pass or fail, and offer his or her score {e.g., 26 out of 35}) upon completion of the grading."


73
K4NL Sid

For the written tests, we were told if we passed or failed and that was it.
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LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #87 on: January 18, 2014, 03:10:37 PM »

When I took my written tests, they would not tell me how many I got right or wrong. They did tell me how many I missed on the morse code part however. But this was back in the early 90's.

According to the VE manual, "The VEs must inform the examinee of their grade (pass or fail, and offer his or her score {e.g., 26 out of 35}) upon completion of the grading."


For the written tests, we were told if we passed or failed and that was it.

I'm telling you what the ARRL VE manual says about it.  It could be that the rules have changed, or that they didn't follow the rules.


73
K4NL Sid
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K7KBN
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Posts: 2764




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« Reply #88 on: January 18, 2014, 05:36:24 PM »

Each of the several VECs (ARRL VEC, NCVEC, W5YI VEC, W4VEC, etc) can make up their own rules regarding such things as disclosing scores.  The VECs are directly answerable to the FCC, not the ARRL.
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
LB3KB
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Posts: 221


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« Reply #89 on: January 18, 2014, 07:04:36 PM »

Each of the several VECs (ARRL VEC, NCVEC, W5YI VEC, W4VEC, etc) can make up their own rules regarding such things as disclosing scores.  The VECs are directly answerable to the FCC, not the ARRL.

I am aware of that.  I have pointed out what the ARRL VE manual says about it.  If you know that one of the other VECs have a different rule regarding this, it would perhaps be interesting to those who do their testing with other VECs.  Knowing that the rules can be different is not all that interesting.  Not to me, at least.

(One reason I think the rules may be interesting to others is that if I had known the rules at the time I took the tests, I could have spent 40-45 minutes less time in a rather hot room and still passed the same tests.)
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