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Author Topic: Testing for Hearing Loss After a Radio Contest  (Read 5683 times)
KE6EE
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Posts: 398




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« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2014, 09:58:52 PM »

According to these charts our ears (brains?) are most sensitive to tones of around 3 kHz. So why don't we listen to code there rather than at about 600-700 Hz?

I don't know quite how to put this, but hearing is not simply a matter of an auditory apparatus (the ear) sensing a signal. Hearing is a very complex process using many neural pathways throughout the brain. The pitches we prefer for listening to CW no doubt reflect a complex process of perception and interpretation.

Keep in mind that a single pitch (say 500 Hz) also contains overtones at various higher intervals from the fundamental at 500 Hz up to and beyond 3K Hz, with energy widely distributed among the intervals.

My guess is that the pitches we prefer with fundamentals approximately at middle C and the next octave or so on the piano are similar to the pitches we hear in human voices for which our hearing and sound interpretation systems have adapted.
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K9IUQ
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Posts: 1957




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« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2014, 07:14:28 AM »

According to these charts our ears (brains?) are most sensitive to tones of around 3 kHz. So why don't we listen to code there rather than at about 600-700 Hz?


A 3khz tone is ear piercing and would probably quickly make you go crazy. Set your Cw tone for 3khz on your radio and you will see for yourself why 3khz is not used. Any tone higher than 1khz is hurtful to my ears.

I have found a lower tone is very useful for helping eliminate noise. I usually use a 600hz tone for CW but on 160mtrs I will use 500hz or lower which makes copy easier with the noise..

Stan K9IUQ
« Last Edit: January 09, 2014, 07:20:18 AM by K9IUQ » Logged
K8AXW
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Posts: 3900




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« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2014, 09:00:13 AM »

Quote
I don't know quite how to put this, but hearing is not simply a matter of an auditory apparatus (the ear) sensing a signal. Hearing is a very complex process using many neural pathways throughout the brain. The pitches we prefer for listening to CW no doubt reflect a complex process of perception and interpretation.

This pretty well says it..... to the unprofessional audiologist, it's very difficult to explain.  My memory has failed me here but I seem to recall that the lower frequencies have more power than the higher frequencies.  In which case frequencies around 600-1KHz contain more power that those frequencies around 3KHz and higher.

It also seems to me that sounds around 3KHz are very similar to the other noise one hears on shortwave.  This makes the lower frequency sounds much easier to hear.

Because of my poor hearing I have taken many hearing tests down through the years.  In each case, it has always been easier to hear the low frequency sounds than the high frequency sounds....even those around 3KHz. 

I presently use a homebrew device that boosts the 3KHz frequency range amplitude to I can operate SSB.  Once again, I think this is because the higher frequencies don't have the power to stimulate the "hairs" in the inner ear.

It would be interesting to hear an explanation from an audiologist on this subject.

Al - K8AXW
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