Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Got a Drake 2-NT, now what?  (Read 4279 times)
KJ6DRG
Member

Posts: 1




Ignore
« on: January 10, 2014, 03:02:50 PM »

Hi everyone,
I'm new to tubes but I am pretty excited about the transmitter I just got. A local ham gifted me a Drake 2-NT he had sitting in the shack. It hasn't been used in years but it turns on, makes a nice humming sound like old electronics do, and all the tubes start glowing like tubes do. For someone who has only had "modern" tranceivers, this new excitement is completely foreign to me! I printed out a copy of the manual and read it but I'm still a bit confused as to what I'm supposed to do with this thing. I currently have no money for a receiver (I will eventually purchase a 2-C  to match this radio) but I was wondering if there is an easy way to use my FT-817 as a receiver. I also have no crystals so I figured I could keep my eyes peeled for a standalone VFO to control the 2-NT, maybe buy a couple crystals in the meantime.

I guess my real question is, how does one use a transmitter like the 2-NT? I know this question probably sounds totally stupid but I really want to use this transmitter.

Thanks  Smiley
Logged
NK6Q
Member

Posts: 202




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 05:30:38 PM »

The manual should have tune-up instructions (i.e. dipping the plate, increasing the load), but you will need an appropriate crystal and antenna load.  A 100 w dummy load is plenty for a 2NT.

FYI: the "NT" stands for Novice Transmitter.  When the 2C and 2NT came out, they were considered the Rolls Royce of Novice stations because of their performance and price!

Bill in Pasadena
NK6Q
Logged
KQ6Q
Member

Posts: 965




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 09:52:38 PM »

to safely use the 2NT as a transmitter while you use your 817 as the receiver, you'll need a coax switch or a coax type antenna relay, as well as crystals or a VFO.
Oh the other hand, if you want to read up on tube theory and amplifiers, you could re-purpose the 2NT as a tube amplifier for the 817.
You'll still need some sort of antenna relay, but you could use it 'as is' on CW to amplify the output of the 817 - you'd probably want to bypass the oscillator-multiplier tube(s) and feed the signal to the final grid directly, but you'd have a really cool, unique setup. Get with some old-timers in your local club if you want to attempt this!
If you wanted to use it on SSB, there would be several more changes to make, to run the final in class AB, rather than the Class C that was standard for novice tube finals.  this gives you an excuse to read up on tube transmitters! Find some ARRL handbooks from the 1950's and 1960's.
Logged
N6GND
Member

Posts: 334




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2014, 10:00:21 AM »

The 2NT has a built-in antenna relay and semi-QSK circuit. You will notice the delay control on the front panel for this. On the rear panel you will see antenna input and receiver output coax fittings. The relay can also switch a muting line from the receiver.

That's the beauty of the 2NT--a sophisticated T/R switching circuit built-in. Designed to be used with the 2C receiver. You can figure out how to use it with whatever receiver you may want to use.

The manual is available on-line.

One thing to keep in mind is that there is more voltage on the keying circuit of these transmitters than with a SS rig. You might want to use an appropriate keyer or buffer keying circuit.
Logged
AD4U
Member

Posts: 2153




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2014, 05:24:26 AM »

After hamming almost 50 years and working every country on the planet (and then some - space shuttle) I wanted a new challenge.  I bought a 2NT and a 2B receiver.  Both are around 45 - 50 years old.  The 2NT runs around 50 watts crystal control.  The Drake 2B receiver came out in 1963 so it is 50 years old.

In about 5 years I have worked 289 countries with this ancient station only on 40M CW.

You DO NOT need a modern $10,000 transceiver to be a ham.

Enjoy your 2NT.  Keep looking for a Drake 2B or 2C receiver to go with your 2NT.  You won't regret it.

Dick  AD4U
Logged
G3RZP
Member

Posts: 4389




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2014, 02:49:02 PM »

AD4U,

So what you have done with the 2NT requires developing a skill. No instant gratification, but a skill, honed admittedly over the years, of which I feel you can be proud.

Far more so than someone just buying a new TriYeaCom and working SSB to get those countries - many of them on nets.

But an option of learning a skill likely to lead as an example to others (newbies included)  of a much better understanding of fundamentals when graduating to a more  complex modern SSB transceiver and hopefully avoiding some of the inane questions seen on eHam.net from Extra Class licensees!
Logged
KG8LB
Member

Posts: 234




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2014, 11:46:09 AM »

   Avoid upgrading beyong General and you minimize the risks ; Little chance to be accused of uttering an inane question from half way around the globe  Wink
Logged
N3WAK
Member

Posts: 274




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2014, 06:34:15 AM »

KJ6DRG:  You've got a great transmitter.  I have two Drake 2-NTs, including one I bought last year NOS.  I had one when I was a Novice back in the early 70s.  Anyway, get yourself a couple of crystals.  You can order them from International Crystal Manufacturing in Oklahoma.  Just call up customer service--they'll help you buying the correct type of xtal.  They have a website.  If you're new to CW, 7.114 MHz seems to be a good frequency, with a lot of slow speed CW there and helpful Elmers.  A good website to check out is WB4HFN.com, run by Ron Baker, who is an outstanding Drake technician if you ever need your rig professionally repaired. 

I use a Drake 2-B receiver, but there are a lot of boat anchor receivers out there that work wonderfully with the 2-NT.  The 2-NT is a super well-built rig and very easy to use.  With CW, you can easily work the world on 50 watts of output.  I think you've got the nicest CW transmitter there is. 

Have fun!  73, Tony
Logged
W8AAZ
Member

Posts: 323




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2014, 03:02:38 PM »

I started as a novice with a cheap Radio Shack SW receiver and a vintage tube transmitter that had seen better days and yielded mediocre results.  Then I got ahold of the club loaner novice station for awhile.  2C and 2NT.  Was a world of difference and worked great. I only wish I kept my novice crystals. As I have a nice resto project transmitter that might benefit from those.  The 40M slow speed CW and vintage novice rig area seems to be about 7.110-7.120 top end.  If you can get crystals in that range, you are good to go for some contacts. Sometimes you will make daytime contacts there but many in the evenings with better propagation.  Just that in nighttime, other modes and ops start squeezing on both ends of that range a bit. SSB and digital modes or such.  Pure CW band on 40 has shrunk tremendously over the years.  I don't know about 80M CW.  Might find some QRS stations there but I can't name a freq. for you. Good that it is there on 40.  Would be discouraging to be a beginner and have someone come blasting back at you at 40 WPM.  That 7.114 plus or minus someone quoted is a good start.     
Logged
N4UE
Member

Posts: 291




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2014, 04:18:13 PM »

Hi everyone,
I'm new to tubes but I am pretty excited about the transmitter I just got. A local ham gifted me a Drake 2-NT he had sitting in the shack. It hasn't been used in years but it turns on, makes a nice humming sound like old electronics do, and all the tubes start glowing like tubes do. For someone who has only had "modern" tranceivers, this new excitement is completely foreign to me! I printed out a copy of the manual and read it but I'm still a bit confused as to what I'm supposed to do with this thing. I currently have no money for a receiver (I will eventually purchase a 2-C  to match this radio) but I was wondering if there is an easy way to use my FT-817 as a receiver. I also have no crystals so I figured I could keep my eyes peeled for a standalone VFO to control the 2-NT, maybe buy a couple crystals in the meantime.

I guess my real question is, how does one use a transmitter like the 2-NT? I know this question probably sounds totally stupid but I really want to use this transmitter.

Hi. You have a great xmitter. I have a lot of Drakes and have a 2-C/2-CQ to go with it and my 2-NT. The 2-C is an excellent receiver. I also have a 2-B/2-CQ and it's great, also.

ron
N4UE
I have

Thanks  Smiley
Logged
K3STX
Member

Posts: 961




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2014, 11:00:39 AM »

What you do next is give the 2-NT to me!! I just bought a Drake receiver and I need a transmitter!! Grin

paul
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!