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Author Topic: ARRL VHF Contest  (Read 3507 times)
K2TTM
Member

Posts: 51




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« on: January 19, 2014, 11:16:35 AM »

Is it just me or is 6 meters terrible this weekend?  I have been trying to work the VHF Contest on 6 meters (CW) and have only managed 24 contacts in 24 hours from FN30.  I heard a few more that didn't hear me.

Running a 100 watts with a Hexbeam at 30' and an OCF Windom at 40'

Mike
K2TTM
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99.9% of the time I'm on the air, I'll be on CW.
N2SLO
Member

Posts: 61




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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2014, 06:12:46 AM »

Mike, very limited E's entire contest for us entire weekend (at least on phone). I was able to only log 46 contacts entire contest on 6M. Helps to have other bands, 2M was decent, 432 was also good.

David
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N7SMI
Member

Posts: 315




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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2014, 08:12:18 AM »

You east-coaster's have it SOOO rough. Wink I didn't hear a single station from here in Utah (in just a few hours of listening/calling).
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N2SLO
Member

Posts: 61




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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2014, 10:00:13 AM »

Not a single station ?    Shocked

wow I guess we should be happy on our location. In the New York City - Long Island area, we have a good 200-300 mile radius to make contacts, with stations in New Jersey, Connecticut, Mass, VT, New Hampshire, Delaware and Maryland without any enhancements or tropo. I bet though for HF you probably have opportunities to speak with ASIA and New Zealand/Australia, which is very difficult for us. We also have the advantage of large population centers with many amateurs. This is on all of the lower bands (2M, 6M, 222, and 432). I don't have ther upper bands but plenty of activity as well with smaller ranges.
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K4EJQ
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Posts: 99




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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2014, 09:03:42 PM »

Hi All; I wish I could be more optimistic, but for what its' worth, here in the Tri-Cities area of NE TN- ALL VHF/UHF and "Sprints" Contests have been poorly attended for the past few years. You would think that with all these multi-mode HF-VHF rigs in use, there would be plenty of activity. The key phrase here is "in use". They ain't !!!  Oh well, we got the CQ WW 160 meter test this coming weekend to look forward to. Have fun, It's still one of the best hobbies around. 73, Bunky, K4EJQ
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VE3CX
Member

Posts: 44




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« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2014, 05:21:48 AM »

I heard about half a dozen stations, and managed to get one in the log.  Its rough when no one close by gets on, but so be it...

Tom - VE3CX
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N9DG
Member

Posts: 311




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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2014, 11:35:56 AM »

Though I've tried and tried, I just can't understand how there can be more 50/144/432MHz SSB/CW capable radios available than ever before, and already in the hands of more operators than ever before, and yet so few of them actually get on the air. Unquestionably there are far fewer operators actually getting on for the various VHF contests recently than there was before these kinds of radios were commonly available starting around 1995.

Is the really rather minimal effort that it takes to get a simple horizontally polarized omni, or small beam of some kind going on these bands really that much of an obstacle? And for it to be a show stopping obstacle for the 95% or more of those who already have the thousands and thousands of these radios like the IC-706 series, IC-7000, FT-8x7 family, TS-2000, and so on already in their hands?

And then additionally, the efforts by contest sponsors to encourage those who already have all these radios to get on the contests with them are consistently met with total ambivalence. And the recently created ARRL SO3B category that provides a means for those who have these radios to get on and not be competing with the existing Single Op Low Power or Single Op High power Stations seems to have also done nearly nothing to get more of them on the air either.

And even the efforts by the various VHF groups around the country all seem to have had very little impact in getting people who already have these radios motivated enough to actually use them 50MHz and up SSB/CW. These VHF groups will get very few takers for the knowledge and assistance that they all can offer.

All in all a truly puzzling phenomenon. It is almost as if everything that has made getting on 50MHz and up with SSB/CW easier, less expensive than ever before seems to have had the exact opposite effect that one would think it should for the levels of band activity. Perhaps things being easier and less expensive than ever before is not truly a good thing???
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