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Author Topic: Noise "spikes"  (Read 14508 times)
NO2A
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Posts: 779




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« on: January 24, 2014, 09:37:22 PM »

Ever notice these sounds as you`re tuning across the bands? Maybe this is something new,as I don`t remember this years ago. Noisy spikes that actually hurt if you`re using headphones. Anyone know what causes this?
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K3LRH
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Posts: 58




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« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2014, 05:45:58 PM »

.....Michael, this time of the year, almost anything that can make a noise, will. Particularly in the lower HF bands.

73
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KB4QAA
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Posts: 2367




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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2014, 07:18:52 PM »

Not really sure what you are speaking of.

A 'spike' while tuning across a fixed signal, may not be spiking anything, since in may really be a constant transmission, with constant signal level...you get the idea.  You caused the spiking effect by rapidly tuning across it.  Other signals really do appear momentarily, or sweep across the band (a commonly heard 'mystery' signal).

Probably the biggest source of carriers, or signals with no apparent mode or modulation is probably very distant stations where only the carrier survives or heterodynes between two signals which are on the same or adjacent frequencies.

There are all sorts of sources of signals.  If you want to intelligently discuss them, you will need to be rather specific, the more the better. Band, frequency, time of day, type of transmission i.e. carrier, heterodyne, AM/SSB digital, any sort of modulation, rough width etc.    

It isn't simple when you start to make a study of classifying and identifying signals.    Keep a notebook or log of stations, signals frequencies and times can help in becoming familiar and figuring things out.  It's easy now to record them with your computer for future reference.

In days of yore, many of us hams started as teenage Short Wave Listeners, SWL, and spent endless hours wandering the bands and discovering signals and learning the nature of the airwaves.

The Web has made sharing signals and teaching much easier. YouTube has many sources.  

Slowing down and listening, really listening can be fascinating!  73, bill



« Last Edit: February 07, 2014, 07:22:41 PM by KB4QAA » Logged
KE7TMA
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Posts: 471




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« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2014, 02:27:15 PM »

Ever notice these sounds as you`re tuning across the bands? Maybe this is something new,as I don`t remember this years ago. Noisy spikes that actually hurt if you`re using headphones. Anyone know what causes this?

We just had a bunch of snow here in Portland and I did notice a very large increase in these noise 'spikes' as you call them especially right around and into the maximum usable frequencies on HF.
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NO2A
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Posts: 779




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« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2014, 08:20:36 PM »

I haven`t heard those sounds for awhile now. Quite simply they were spikes of noise while listening to cw. Independent of tuning across the band or not. They are not modulation of any kind. Probably just atmospheric stuff. Very annoying though.
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KA5QMA
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2014, 08:15:12 PM »

I haven`t heard those sounds for awhile now. Quite simply they were spikes of noise while listening to cw. Independent of tuning across the band or not. They are not modulation of any kind. Probably just atmospheric stuff. Very annoying though.

Noise levels on 10 meters (cw) suddenly went from nothing to S9 a few minutes ago. South Pacific stations that were solid 569s or 579s are now buried and inaudible.
It was like a curtain coming down. Every morning, the opposite happens. Noise levels suddenly drop from S7 or so to nearly nothing, and I have superb conditions (quiet with great propagation) on 10m all day up to about 10 pm again. I'll try to observe the actual times of these events and get back to you. Anybody else see this on ten?
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KI6LZ
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Posts: 586




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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2014, 08:37:56 PM »

Sounds like you got a bad case of power line, street light, or switched power supply noise.
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NO2A
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Posts: 779




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« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2014, 01:45:25 PM »

I too have heard more noise on the higher bands. This qrn I was referring to,was very high pitched,if you were wearing headphones you`d say,"Ouch." Haven`t heard it recently though.
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KI6LZ
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Posts: 586




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« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2014, 02:34:03 PM »

Really need a spectrum display and waterfall to aid in trying to determine what the noise is. Sometimes an audio recording helps. Otherwise it is just too hard to give any meaningful help.
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KA5QMA
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Posts: 19




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« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2014, 08:18:30 PM »

Sounds like you got a bad case of power line, street light, or switched power supply noise.

My 10m "wall of noise" is back and right on time, starting exactly a few seconds before 0254 utc. Must be man-made. I'll have to ask around locally and see if anybody else can hear it.
I wonder what is coming on for 12 hours every night!
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