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Author Topic: What is REAL CW?  (Read 16921 times)
N4DSP
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Posts: 148




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« on: January 27, 2014, 12:16:49 AM »

There are many aspects in today's cw. To newcomer's who know how to type but don't know the code their idea of cw is sitting in front of a computer screen running a cw generated program with a keyboard and doing 60 wpm and watching the letters flow across the screen.

For other's it is using a straight key. More traditional operators use a Bug. While the generally accepted and most used are with dual paddles in iambic fashion generated electronically.

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LB3KB
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« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2014, 02:55:41 AM »

Quit worrying, you'll give yourself wrinkles.

73
K4NL Sid
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K7MEM
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« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2014, 04:04:45 AM »

I don't worry about it either. Real CW is what ever you want it to be. I gave up the straight key 35 years ago when I discovered keyers. Now I use a Bug, but it's wired to one of my keyers.

So it's everything you mentioned and everything in between.
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Martin - K7MEM

http://www.k7mem.com
W1JKA
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Posts: 1656




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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2014, 04:36:39 AM »

Re: N4DSP

Well as of now I have never heard of MAKE BELIEVE CW, how it is sent or received in Hamdom is moot. Is a Ham that may have some physical disability and has to use a code reader because of deafness or has to use a keyboard because of some type hand/arm/wrist related problem some how not sending and receiving REAL CW? Debate all you want about what REAL CW is or isn't, but the bottom line is we all should be glad that CW is still being learned and used no matter what method is used to send and receive. BTW I use a straight key and if my side tone is to be considered any type of reliable indicator the CW sounds REAL to me.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2014, 04:46:12 AM by W1JKA » Logged
KB1WSY
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Posts: 765




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« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2014, 05:04:01 AM »

It is all "real" regardless of copy and generation methods.

However I will admit, personally, that I don't see the *point* of working CW if you do all of your copying using software and all of your generation using keyboards or macros. If you're doing that, why not use an all-digital mode? With the added advantage of built-in digital error correction for tough conditions?

For me, CW happens "in the head" and not inside a computer chip.

To each, his own....
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3825




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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2014, 06:58:32 AM »

The answer to this question is quite simple.

If the code is generated by a key, bug, keyer (electronic keyers require a on/off switch device to activate the correct sequence of dits and dahs) and the reception is done by ear, and not by computer or other electronic devices, it's REAL CW.

Otherwise, it's simply digital. 

Al - K8AXW
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PA0WV
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Posts: 133




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« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2014, 07:23:16 AM »

Hahaha

Imaginary CW is when you got a message from the heaven, the place where 77 virgins are awaiting you. (males only). May be you got it via old door hinges crying for some grease, going up and down in the wind, or sitting in your back yard whistled by the birds.

Everything else known by the ATU as A1A is real CW.

However when you think you need a decoder to decode, you don't master the ART OF CW.
You don't preserve it as a world cultural heritage in sound in the way it has to be preserved.

So, may be you need it for juicy DX, go ahead.

When you just want to use it as a ham with a decoder and a keyboard, for rag chewing, you are much better off with PSK31. That is not an art, but it yields you probably better reliability than Morse decoders can do.
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Using an appliance without CW is just CB
KB1WSY
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Posts: 765




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« Reply #7 on: January 27, 2014, 07:30:03 AM »

May be you got it via old door hinges crying for some grease, going up and down in the wind....

I prefer the virgins. As for imaginary CW, I think I started dreaming about CW recently; but I'm not yet dreaming *in* CW unfortunately. Both are examples of unreal CW....

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
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AA4PB
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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2014, 09:48:26 AM »

Perhaps non of us is using real CW. Real CW is a continuous wave that doesn't vary in amplitude or frequency thus it can carry no information. What we are using to send Morse code is ICW (Interrupted Continuous Wave).  Wink
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NI0C
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« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2014, 10:10:44 AM »

Perhaps non of us is using real CW. Real CW is a continuous wave that doesn't vary in amplitude or frequency thus it can carry no information. What we are using to send Morse code is ICW (Interrupted Continuous Wave).  Wink

Well, yes, except for the lids who tune up on the DX stations.
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W8MW
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Posts: 326




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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2014, 11:02:42 AM »

It's interesting to note the ITU (International Telecommunications Union) established a set of alphanumeric codes to identify radio transmissions and modulation formats.  The answer to what is real CW can be found here.

If you have a log book and keep track of what mode you use to make contacts, an informal entry could be CW.  If you want to be technically correct you would use the ITU emission designator:  A1A

A = the type of radio signal is amplitude modulation (information is extracted from variations imposed on a carrier)
1 = the type of modulating signal is single channel digital (the code characters you generate are a digital stream)
A= the type of transmitted information is telegraphy for aural reception (code to be copied by a human)

This one throws even old timers:  CW is AM. 

73 Mike W8MW
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AA4PB
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« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2014, 11:21:25 AM »

Ah, but the ITU designation "A1A" does not say that the mode is "CW". It says the modulation type is "AM". I expect that early hams (and others) used CW to differentiate if from rotary spark which modulated the wave during key down time with a raspy tone. During key down time CW stations put out a pure, un-modulated signal.

According to the ITU designation, it appears that computer decoded Morse is not "A1A" since it is not being copied by a human.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2014, 11:24:41 AM by AA4PB » Logged
W8MW
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Posts: 326




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« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2014, 11:35:29 AM »

That's a fun historical perspective.  It must have been a real treat for those operators when pure and clean Morse signals replaced that raspy harsh old stuff.

Yes the designator for machine telegraphy is A1B.  Best I can tell for an unmodulated carrier it's N0X.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2014, 11:50:45 AM by W8MW » Logged
WB2WIK
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Posts: 20595




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« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2014, 06:05:53 PM »

I think "real CW" is when operators understand what they're doing and do it the very best they can.

Anyone can learn Morse Code.  But being a CW operator involves much more than that.

I don't know anyone who became a real CW operator in weeks or months; it usually takes years.

I monitored the code classes given at Ft. Monmouth, NJ as a kid -- that was the U.S. Army Signal Corps training center.  Everything they did was ridiculous and didn't work well.  My hat's off to anyone who learned anything that way. Wink
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K8AXW
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Posts: 3825




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« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2014, 06:44:40 PM »

WIK:  I went through Ft. Devens code school.  They turned out CW intercept operators by the hundreds each year.

What kind of training did you observe at Monmouth?  I'm interested to learn if the Army had more than one way of teaching code. 
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