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Author Topic: What is REAL CW?  (Read 16091 times)
K0RS
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Posts: 704




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« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2014, 01:48:19 AM »

You're not doing real CW until you can copy the word "TROLL" at a minimum of 30 wpm....by ear.
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PA0WV
Member

Posts: 97




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« Reply #16 on: January 28, 2014, 01:53:04 AM »


According to the ITU designation, it appears that computer decoded Morse is not "A1A" since it is not being copied by a human.



They only say that A1A is Morse telegraphy INTENDED to be copied by human ear. afaik.
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KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 459




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« Reply #17 on: January 28, 2014, 05:30:31 PM »

There are many aspects in today's cw. To newcomer's who know how to type but don't know the code their idea of cw is sitting in front of a computer screen running a cw generated program with a keyboard and doing 60 wpm and watching the letters flow across the screen.

For other's it is using a straight key. More traditional operators use a Bug. While the generally accepted and most used are with dual paddles in iambic fashion generated electronically.



It's just beeps.  Who cares what gear the other guy is using, make yourself happy.
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3672




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« Reply #18 on: January 28, 2014, 08:00:17 PM »

Ahhh yes.  The feel good generation.  Never mind the answer as long as you feel good.  No more report cards or grading because someone will have their feelings hurt.  No more competition because everyone is a winner even if you quit the race in the middle.

I have no idea why this question came up unless it was to solicit "feel good" answers.
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 208




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« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2014, 09:32:16 PM »

To me personally, Morse code is to be copied by ear.  It really is terrible for machine copy as compared to modes designed for sound card reception, like PSK or the various multi-tone modes.   I've slowed down a bit due to lack of practice, but still head-copy easily into the 40's, according to my G4FON code practice program, probably a left-over skill from those years of putting eastern Bloc radio cipher traffic onto paper. Some of those Russian Morse ops were VERY good & accurate! // others - not-so-much   Tongue  //

For sending, I still prefer my straight key (#199 made by G3YUH) or my Vibroplex. On the Vibroplex, the BEST accurate sending speed I have been able to confirm is 38 WPM.  For me to increase my copy speed into the realm of the REAL QRQ Ops(50-60+ WPM) , I suppose that a keyboard for sending would be a necessity.  I am no T.R. McElroy. Speaking of keyboards, I had a medical incident that caused very slight degradation in my right handed straight key 'fist' , so I do understand when alternate methods of sending might be necessary.  Not being willing to LEARN Morse code is not a 'medical necessity'.

My 0.02 dollars worth.  Please adjust for inflation as you see fit.


73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._ ._

Ps. You CAN listen to music on a SmartPhone, but that does not make you a musician: radiotelegraphy is the same.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2014, 09:44:14 PM by W7ASA » Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3672




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« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2014, 09:08:53 AM »

ASA: Amen!!  Das ist allus!
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K7RNO
Member

Posts: 279




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« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2014, 10:08:21 PM »

When you're having a hard time hanging onto the desk because the sea is so angry that your arm is too short to reach the key that you had screwed onto the desk, when you're thrown up but you don't have to send eight dits because you never made a mistake, and when the ship is going up (and you down), your ratio between dits and dahs stays perfect and you only lose one or two WPM in speed and never get any puke between the contacts, that is real CW.
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73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
W1JKA
Member

Posts: 1619




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« Reply #22 on: January 30, 2014, 01:31:01 AM »

Re: K7RNO  reply #21

And all this time knowing the Old Man wants your OT sheet turned in by coffee time. If the lubbers only knew. Wink
« Last Edit: January 30, 2014, 01:34:53 AM by W1JKA » Logged
GW3OQK
Member

Posts: 133




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« Reply #23 on: January 30, 2014, 08:12:01 AM »

When you're having a hard time hanging onto the desk because the sea is so angry that your arm is too short to reach the key that you had screwed onto the desk, when you're thrown up but you don't have to send eight dits because you never made a mistake, and when the ship is going up (and you down), your ratio between dits and dahs stays perfect and you only lose one or two WPM in speed and never get any puke between the contacts, that is real CW.

RNO, JKA, for me it was when throwing up was a long past memory. You could tell how much it was rolling by the change in note as you took the WX, TTTs, TFC, and you chained your chair tight to the deck. We were using it FOR REAL then, the professionals. It was the only way we could communicate unless by lamp to a passing ship.

Andrew
PS guess I'm just an Ichthyosaur.
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K7KBN
Member

Posts: 2765




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« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2014, 04:53:42 PM »

When you're on an aircraft carrier (for me, USS Kitty Hawk, CVA-63 -- aka NZFF), you generally have to stick your head outside to see if you're at sea or not.  Grin

As "Honor Man" of my A-School class in 1963, I was "assured" my choice of duty station or ship.  I'd seen so many articles in QST about icebreakers returning from the Antarctic that there was no question in my mind:  I wanted an AGB!

Wound up assigned to CARAEWRON 13 (Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron).  And they had no need of any Radiomen at all.  The squadron personnel officer drove me "up the hill" at North Island to see the Personnelmen and plead my case.  He then drove me back down the hill and delivered me to the Kitty Hawk, where I spent the next three years.

Carriers have deep keels.  Icebreakers have round bottoms.  A visit to Disneyland and a ride on the silly little teacups convinced me that those Personnelmen saved my life!  I never realized just how susceptible I am to motion sickness until about ten seconds into that ride with my kids... Sad Shocked Sad
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73
Pat K7KBN
CWO4 USNR Ret.
KG6AF
Member

Posts: 335




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« Reply #25 on: January 30, 2014, 06:38:20 PM »

A REAL CW operator can teach code to a dog!

http://www.kn3c.com/Shep/Code%20School.mp3

(Warning: this page starts playing audio immediately.)
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K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3672




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« Reply #26 on: January 30, 2014, 07:19:41 PM »

KBN:  Back before the jet aircraft and so many overseas flights, I crossed the Atlantic in the winter twice..... from NY to Bremerhaven, Germany.

After the return trip, I took an oath that I would get on another ship only if I was in chains or a box! 

Why in the hell any sane man would want to voluntarily serve on a ship is beyond my comprehension!
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ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 355




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« Reply #27 on: January 30, 2014, 07:49:24 PM »

When you're having a hard time hanging onto the desk because the sea is so angry that your arm is too short to reach the key that you had screwed onto the desk, when you're thrown up but you don't have to send eight dits because you never made a mistake, and when the ship is going up (and you down), your ratio between dits and dahs stays perfect and you only lose one or two WPM in speed and never get any puke between the contacts, that is real CW.

The thing that always "amused" me was when the ship was rolling and the typewriter would only work on a roll one way, it would not go uphill on the other roll. 

Hit a biggy crossing the southern ocean, the chain on the chair broke and I shot off backwards across the radio room with the typewriter landing in my lap, that was not so bad, it was the return journey to the desk that hurt.  Unfortunately that ship had lovely big radio room, could have held a party in there.
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
K7RNO
Member

Posts: 279




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« Reply #28 on: January 30, 2014, 07:56:32 PM »

I crossed the Atlantic in the winter twice.....
Why in the hell any sane man would want to voluntarily serve on a ship is beyond my comprehension!

Bad timing. Winter is when the Atlantic is particularly angry.

Outside of cold weather, nothing beats a rough day at sea that you can be out on deck. Sigh!
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73,
aRNO
NAQCC #6870, SKCC #11131
ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 355




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« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2014, 12:06:54 AM »

I crossed the Atlantic in the winter twice.....
Why in the hell any sane man would want to voluntarily serve on a ship is beyond my comprehension!

Bad timing. Winter is when the Atlantic is particularly angry.

Outside of cold weather, nothing beats a rough day at sea that you can be out on deck. Sigh!

One ship I was on was such a heap of **** it was only insured to mid Atlantic, so they had us running up to LuleƄ and down to Nouadhibou, freezing to sweating not a lot of fun.

Anyway back to the original Q, the real morse, best example I can remember is the sight of Inky  with a bug key doing the Christmas traffic lists at GKA, the carousel (one layer for British the other for foreign) full of traffic spinning round at a rate of knots and inky grabbing the next section, with one hand whilst hand keying the tl on a bug at 30's and it would still take nearly a full hour to do the whole Traffic List.  Then it would all start again with either foreign or British ships whoever was next, he was a maestro with the key.  Normally it was typed up, but there was so much traffic coming in/out at christmas that the only way really was to hand key it then it was absolutely up to the minute.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2014, 12:12:29 AM by ZL1BBW » Logged

ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
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