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Author Topic: What is REAL CW?  (Read 16750 times)
KB1WSY
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Posts: 725




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« Reply #60 on: February 11, 2014, 01:49:38 PM »

Well, as someone who is learning to copy and send CW, it sure seems like "real CW" for many is morse code sent without spaces.  In an average day I can count dozens of old-school "REAL CW" operators sending CQCQCQCQDEAB1CDAB1CDAB1CDK

I guess the spaces and proper spacing are just extraneous nonsense.

That being said, it does make for some interesting practice.

73

Dave
K3DCW

I beg to disagree, but I'm on shakey ground, being also someone who is currently learning Morse.

I hear a lot of CW on the air with long spaces between the characters, far more than the three-dit standard. It's almost as if they learned using Farnsworth spacing, but never dropped it.

(Now of course, there are some operators who, out of courtesy, use longer spacing because another ham has asked them to QRS. That's another matter.)

Although the longer inter-character spacing makes the code easier to copy for a beginner, I find that it also gives the code a "choppy" rhythm that's harder to copy in the long run. (And it's inefficiently slow, for those who can copy it at the proper speed.)

And yes, I do occasionally hear some code with all the letters run together (fewer than three dits in between them) but I'd say that's less common than the "exaggerated spacing" described above.

If you listen to the computer-generated W1AW bulletins at 18wpm they sound much more "continuous" than a lot of the "choppy" code I'm describing above.

Now perhaps the code veterans can tell me whether I'm on the wrong track here ....

(In my own learning, I am gradually moving toward eliminating the Farnsworth spacing. I think it's a mixed blessing. It makes it easier to learn/copy the characters, but it also accustoms the "ear" and the "fist" to use non-standard spacing.)

73 de Martin, KB1WSY
« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 01:54:34 PM by KB1WSY » Logged
N4OI
Member

Posts: 203




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« Reply #61 on: February 11, 2014, 02:54:44 PM »

I think real CW operator would use the Eico "Seven Drifty Three" and a  Gotham vertical antenna and a straight key.

Yep, real CW is copying a poor bug fist with a raspy, chirpy tone through the QRM and just above the QRN, all while keeping a hand on the RIT to follow the signal up, down and all around.   Priceless!

73
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WB3CQM
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Posts: 116




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« Reply #62 on: February 11, 2014, 04:20:15 PM »

I think real CW operator would use the Eico "Seven Drifty Three" and a  Gotham vertical antenna and a straight key.

Yep, real CW is copying a poor bug fist with a raspy, chirpy tone through the QRM and just above the QRN, all while keeping a hand on the RIT to follow the signal up, down and all around.   Priceless!

73

I walked into the room read this post by you  and I was hearing a raspy chirpy signal way below qrn level. I put my head phone on and copied VE7SL/qrp . I have 2 pre amps on and if I turned them off there would be no station ,I tuned the beam few degree NW and lost him turned it back where I heard him and called there. We had a solid contact that lasted about 3 min. Outrages to work a station on 10 meter band as this was i could barley hear him with 2 preamps. Must have been my beam doing the work ? Look at his homemade transmitter on his qrz page. I gave him a 228 and he gave me a 559. Not sure the 8 is correct ? maybe 7 or something ?

When I call cq no one needs to fret about any of their cw . I work every one and any one poor fist good fist , slow , fast, bugs ,straight key,  iambic , electric , or keyboard . I do draw the line at flashing lights please no flashing lights  . It is real people sending real cw that is why I call cq . To meet anyone and every one in cw mode that will come back to my cq. It is priceless the cw ops I meet on the air.

I was discussing this thread with a good friend of mine . A ex Navy radio op WB3CQD notice the CQD in his call. Know what that meant years pass ?

Anyway he sent me his call sign at 50 to 60 wpm. He said hear that ? That is NOT cw . This is Beautiful CW and he sent his call around 20 wpm. That is his opinion of real cw. I did copy music to the ear  in the call at 20 wpm . I must admit ! So could real cw be related to a speed ?

« Last Edit: February 11, 2014, 04:23:24 PM by WB3CQM » Logged
AE4RV
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Posts: 948


WWW

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« Reply #63 on: February 12, 2014, 05:56:47 AM »

They issued CQD as a suffix, interesting. I wonder if they would issue SOS for one...probably not.
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WB3CQM
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Posts: 116




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« Reply #64 on: February 12, 2014, 06:18:43 AM »

They issued CQD as a suffix, interesting. I wonder if they would issue SOS for one...probably not.

This is pretty good article on SOS and CQD , not to get off the subject of what is real cw .

www.telegraph-office.com/pages/arc2-2.html

73 JIM
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AA4PB
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Posts: 12801




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« Reply #65 on: February 12, 2014, 10:13:14 AM »

They issued CQD as a suffix, interesting. I wonder if they would issue SOS for one...probably not.

CQD hasn't been used for many years. SOS is the current distress signal. It stands to reason that they would issue CQD but not SOS.
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W7ASA
Member

Posts: 221




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« Reply #66 on: February 12, 2014, 06:04:58 PM »

CQD as a suffix is pretty cool. 

As for a call sign suffix of SOS - uuuuuh, you are right.  That would be like naming my boat "MAYDAY!" .  The coasties might become a bit upset.




73 de Ray
W7ASA ..._  ._
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N4DSP
Member

Posts: 124




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« Reply #67 on: February 13, 2014, 12:22:46 PM »

I think real CW operator would use the Eico "Seven Drifty Three" and a  Gotham vertical antenna and a straight key.

Yep, real CW is copying a poor bug fist with a raspy, chirpy tone through the QRM and just above the QRN, all while keeping a hand on the RIT to follow the signal up, down and all around.   Priceless!

73

I walked into the room read this post by you  and I was hearing a raspy chirpy signal way below qrn level. I put my head phone on and copied VE7SL/qrp . I have 2 pre amps on and if I turned them off there would be no station ,I tuned the beam few degree NW and lost him turned it back where I heard him and called there. We had a solid contact that lasted about 3 min. Outrages to work a station on 10 meter band as this was i could barley hear him with 2 preamps. Must have been my beam doing the work ? Look at his homemade transmitter on his qrz page. I gave him a 228 and he gave me a 559. Not sure the 8 is correct ? maybe 7 or something ?

When I call cq no one needs to fret about any of their cw . I work every one and any one poor fist good fist , slow , fast, bugs ,straight key,  iambic , electric , or keyboard . I do draw the line at flashing lights please no flashing lights  . It is real people sending real cw that is why I call cq . To meet anyone and every one in cw mode that will come back to my cq. It is priceless the cw ops I meet on the air.

I was discussing this thread with a good friend of mine . A ex Navy radio op WB3CQD notice the CQD in his call. Know what that meant years pass ?

Anyway he sent me his call sign at 50 to 60 wpm. He said hear that ? That is NOT cw . This is Beautiful CW and he sent his call around 20 wpm. That is his opinion of real cw. I did copy music to the ear  in the call at 20 wpm . I must admit ! So could real cw be related to a speed ?



Nice Post CQM. I sometimes forget in my pursuit of speed how much of a pleasure cw sent and received at 22 wpm is. It is great conversation CW and a speed which allows me to send with timing, tempo, and rhythm producing excellent characters that is music to the ears. Hopefully the same at the receiving end!

Thanks!

john
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ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 371




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« Reply #68 on: February 13, 2014, 10:59:59 PM »

We used to work a very large Ocean going tug.  Every month maybe more frequently he used to come up with a telegram of employee, hours worked, rate of pay, etc etc etc, it was columns wide and hundreds of words.

This guy could send cw, nice n steady it was pleasure, you could actually lay out the QTC on a page the way he had it in front of him, no shocks or surprises in his sending, it was just nice steady copy low 20's but quicker to handle than many rip n bust merchants.  Always remember working him quite a few times.

The correlation with music I have heard before, my music teacher failed abysmally but G3YY and G2CMH succeeded where he did not. Smiley
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ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
N0JL
Member

Posts: 11




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« Reply #69 on: February 19, 2014, 06:00:02 AM »

My desk now has 1 straight key, 1 cootie key, 1 bug, 1 single lever paddle, 1 iambic paddle, and 1 keyboard.  CW anyone?

CWO, SKCC, NAQCC, etc.
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KI5WW
Member

Posts: 72




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« Reply #70 on: February 28, 2014, 09:43:19 AM »

W4KYR.....
Yep, real CW is copying a poor bug fist with a raspy, chirpy tone through the QRM and just above the QRN, all while keeping a hand on the RIT to follow the signal up, down and all around.   Priceless!



Yea, and the whole time they are bragging on the ol "Boat Anchor" that keeps on chirping in spite of the ol gals age of 60 years plus. Dont mind though. Show me a computer who can do as stated above. Never happen.
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KI5WW
Member

Posts: 72




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« Reply #71 on: February 28, 2014, 10:10:59 AM »

What is up with this real ham and CW?

A real ham uses spark gap to send morse code!  What the heck is this continuous waves stuff?

(Just being humorous - no offense)




Good point!  I remember my first experience with that technology.  I was about 5 years, around 1962. I already had an interest in radio, cuz my uncle who was in the USAF showed up one day and left an old Hali Skyrider.  I twisted those nobs till they finally quit. I remember trying to tune in those martians on SSB, to no avail. All AM radio/cw. Anyhow found an old speaker in the barn, had the usual two wires on it. So, carried it to the house, made sure no one was watching, jammed the two wires in the 115 volt oulet. POW!  Was that the letter "e"?  Not sure how far i transmitted, but my mom heard it out on the front poarch. No harm done. Just a big black mark on the plug. Eight years later i received my novice liscence. WN5KVI.
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KC2MJT
Member

Posts: 59




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« Reply #72 on: March 01, 2014, 04:36:45 PM »

It is what you want to derive from it. Don't buy into the holier than thou people that tell you they're the real deal at 40wpm tapping with their left foot after years in the armed services, and their way is only one 'true' way to operate or learn code.

A true CW op is one that doesn't judge others and appreciates the fact the guy working 5 wpm is just as valid and true a CW op as the guy working at speeds in the stratosphere - and probably less uptight and having more fun to boot.

If all you can manage is 5 wpm and you're having fun, that's fine. Hell, cw is the only mode I operate and the best QSO's I have are in the 12 to 20 wpm range - mostly the former. But then again, others only enjoy QSO's at higher rates or short staccato exchanges in the contests. That's o.k. too. I like peanut butter and onion sandwiches, hate liver. But I have friends that love liver, and I still eat lunch with them. Most of all, I don't judge them.
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