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Author Topic: "Anan-200D Preorders Commence"  (Read 9800 times)
K0OD
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Posts: 2591




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« on: February 19, 2014, 07:12:40 AM »

"introductory pricing is $3989.00, however, a deposit of $100 only is required to book your place in the queue,  shipping commences on the 20th of April 2014."

https://apache-labs.com/al-news/1015/ANAN-200D-Preorders-commence.html

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KA4POL
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Posts: 2128




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« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2014, 08:11:30 AM »

Cheap beta-tester price  Grin
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HAMMYGUY
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Posts: 88




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« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2014, 11:16:59 AM »

Having tried most of the available software on my Anan-10, I'm really wondering what the advantage might be aside from obviously more power.

Heck it's hard enough trying to keep track of more than one receiver window being open, yet that seems to be what all the horn tooting is about nowadays for the new Flex's and Apache's.  2,4,6,or 8 windows open gives what type of advantage?  Sure you can open a very wide window to see from .5Mhz through 6 meters to see the overall propagation conditions, but looking at the DX Cluster can give you that same information.  Or you could simply switch bands to take a look around on the panadapter.
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VA2PBJ
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Posts: 201




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« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2014, 05:37:12 PM »

It's the same power.
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7 3 Peter VA2PBJ
VA2PBJ
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Posts: 201




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« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2014, 05:38:02 PM »

Opps, it's the same power as the 100D
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7 3 Peter VA2PBJ
ZENKI
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Posts: 997




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« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2014, 01:35:40 AM »

When beam steering and DF becomes available  hams will be falling over themselves to get it. The potential for a  station in the city to have a rotatable electronic steerable array on 160 meters to fight QRM will be a huge technical leap forward. The ability to electronically steer antennas without relying on phasing networks and boxes is massive leap forward for combating noise. When you used such a system there is no going back, because going back is going back to the dark ages.

The same goes for DSP based direction finding. Using single site location DF processor you will be able to locate jammers within in seconds to their house block. This is achieved with  only 1 station doing the DF processing. Even a microphone click is enough to get a fix. The algorithms like MUSIC and  ESPRIT are public domain.
The biggest benefit will come will be the whole ham community working together on a wide array DF network. Jammers will truly be a thing of the past because they could be located in minutes.

I used a R&S DF system for monitoring the 80, 40 and 20 meters and the results were  really scary especially when using radiosonde data. That would be a neat feature as well for the Anan 200D to offer. The ability to use the Anan 200d as a ionosphere sounder. Would it not be great to probe the ionosphere and then selecting the right antenna for the path? Another benefit for the DSP DF system is that we could  be doing signal angle of arrival surveys and get to understand and better optimize our antennas  Connect multiple receiver slices to the stacked array and sample the whole band you could easily work out the optimum antenna heights  for your station.
DSP direction techniques will open a new world on our understanding of propagation and antennas. Apache labs should be congratulated for being so technologically bold in their vision for a ham transceiver. Rather than the same me too same old crap technology they actually attempting to take the ham radio transceiver market into the future thats already here.

I must say if the Anan 200D and its features are not vaporware the radio would be the ultimate around especially when it will have a predistortion transmitter. Rather than just delivering gimmicks and no real performance boost like the Flex6700 radios Anan are attempting to deliver a revolutionary radio that is using technology that only governments and the military have had access too.

When you read through what they are planning to offer it will be huge leap for ham radio in the technology stakes. I am excited especially about beam steering and its direction finding features.
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K0OD
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« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2014, 08:31:35 AM »

"I used a R&S DF system for monitoring the 80, 40 and 20 meters and the results were  really scary especially when using radiosonde data."

Zenki, can you provide more info about that. What sort of equipment and antenna(s) were involved? Where did you do this? What sort of accuracy was provided?
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ZENKI
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Posts: 997




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« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2014, 11:38:21 PM »

This system was evaluated when the installation was completed. It was in a government department which  was basically the equivalent of the FCC.

The system  information is readily available on the R&S web page. The system  that I had used, used  crossed loops.  The system also can used with an array of active verticals in an Adcock array. The Adcock array was not as good as the crossed loops for high angle signals. There are a number of super resolution direction finding systems on the market.  Most super resolution direction finder systems use active vertical for low angle signals and some form of loop system for high angle signals. Most users install both options. The music algorithm steers  nulls of the array, it does not use beamforming for direction finding. Its  complex subject matter that cannot be summarized in a forum like this.

 I have direct experience  using the  R&S crossed loop antennas. If this kind of system was used on the ham bands there would be very few jammers left on the ham bands. Azimuth accuracy is less than 1 degree. However using the single sight location software you can nail a station within a few hundred meters or less. It was interesting monitoring the various ham bands and comparing the callsign register with the DF location as provided. Basically you could quickly find  the hams whose registered addresses were wrong or out of date. Thats how accurate the system is. With single sight location you need to to use a ionospheric  sounder for best results. This is why I suggest that the Anan should have an  ionospheric  sounder mode.  For hams single site location DF system would be the best system to use especially when used  with ionosonder/radisonder data. Super resolution  DF is only possible using coherent direct sampling receivers.

http://www.rohde-schwarz.com/en/product/ddf0xe-productstartpage_63493-9482.html
http://www.rohde-schwarz.com/en/product/add011sr-productstartpage_63493-10869.html

Another advantage of super resolution is that it can identify and locate emitters from different locations transmitting at the same time. All the data is processed at once and fixes given for all emitters. Super resolution DF antenna systems can be scaled for any ham location. Over the years I have seen demonstrated super resolution DF systems using only 3 loop antennas.


"I used a R&S DF system for monitoring the 80, 40 and 20 meters and the results were  really scary especially when using radiosonde data."

Zenki, can you provide more info about that. What sort of equipment and antenna(s) were involved? Where did you do this? What sort of accuracy was provided?
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K0OD
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Posts: 2591




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« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2014, 07:45:52 AM »

Thanks Zenki. Your info deserves its own thread. I don't recall seeing much about DFing here in recent years.

Imagine in about a decade tuning across the bands and seeing a signal's location precisely ID'd before that station sends its call.
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PJ2BVU
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Posts: 115




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« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 06:45:12 PM »

...
I used a R&S DF system for monitoring the 80, 40 and 20 meters and the results were  really scary especially when using radiosonde data. That would be a neat feature as well for the Anan 200D to offer. The ability to use the Anan 200d as a ionosphere sounder. Would it not be great to probe the ionosphere and then selecting the right antenna for the path? Another benefit for the DSP DF system is that we could  be doing signal angle of arrival surveys and get to understand and better optimize our antennas  Connect multiple receiver slices to the stacked array and sample the whole band you could easily work out the optimum antenna heights  for your station.
...

You should look at the work done by VK3OE. You can get a taste of it on his bio at http://www.qrz.com/db/VK3OE.
He developed a chirp radar for amateur use which uses the Hermes board (and I presume Angelia and Orion).
VK6PH is building a bistatic chirp radar consisting of 2 units: one for Australia and one for South Africa to find a path between these 2 countries on 50 MHz (if I remember correctly; but it could be 2m).
There is more detail on the 50 MHz chirp radar at https://code.google.com/p/cdar/wiki/Home.
These guys are doing a fantastic job and we live in very exciting times.

Jean-Claude PJ2BVU
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ZENKI
Member

Posts: 997




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« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2014, 04:22:32 PM »

Hi Jean

I have read those articles and all are very interesting.

A whole new world will open up when we start using phase locked direct sampling DSP receivers. This stuff is all old hat for the military and government  installations.
When every ham can sound the ionosphere we will be  able to have a better understanding of propagation and antennas.

It is however single site location direction finding  and beam steering that has me more excited.

...
I used a R&S DF system for monitoring the 80, 40 and 20 meters and the results were  really scary especially when using radiosonde data. That would be a neat feature as well for the Anan 200D to offer. The ability to use the Anan 200d as a ionosphere sounder. Would it not be great to probe the ionosphere and then selecting the right antenna for the path? Another benefit for the DSP DF system is that we could  be doing signal angle of arrival surveys and get to understand and better optimize our antennas  Connect multiple receiver slices to the stacked array and sample the whole band you could easily work out the optimum antenna heights  for your station.
...

You should look at the work done by VK3OE. You can get a taste of it on his bio at http://www.qrz.com/db/VK3OE.
He developed a chirp radar for amateur use which uses the Hermes board (and I presume Angelia and Orion).
VK6PH is building a bistatic chirp radar consisting of 2 units: one for Australia and one for South Africa to find a path between these 2 countries on 50 MHz (if I remember correctly; but it could be 2m).
There is more detail on the 50 MHz chirp radar at https://code.google.com/p/cdar/wiki/Home.
These guys are doing a fantastic job and we live in very exciting times.

Jean-Claude PJ2BVU
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