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Author Topic: What is a Boat Anchor?  (Read 23484 times)
K2OWK
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« on: February 25, 2014, 09:25:34 PM »

How old does a radio have to be to be considered a boat anchor? I have a Yaesu FT-4700RH transceiver. These radios were made in the early 1980s. Are they considered Boat anchor's? Just curious as to what is the designation of a Boat Anchor?

Thanks,

73s

K2OWK
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KI6LZ
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2014, 09:33:04 PM »

Not really sure it goes by age, think it has to do with weight. Maybe around 100 lbs?
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KE6EE
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« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2014, 10:24:09 PM »

Not really sure it goes by age, think it has to do with weight. Maybe around 100 lbs?

More like density or weight per unit volume. A big boat anchor like a Heath DX100 or a Johnson Viking would be about 100 lbs. and maybe 2.5 cubic ft. A small boat anchor like a Drake R2B might be 10 lbs and maybe .25 cubic ft. Density of big and small would be about the same at something like 40 lbs. per cubic ft.
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KI6LZ
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2014, 11:00:28 PM »

Thanks for the density reminder. Forgot doing those physics calculations.
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KI6LZ
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2014, 11:39:13 PM »

DX-100 comess out to 37.63 lbs/cubic ft.
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W8JI
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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2014, 12:34:09 AM »

I think the term is commonly applied to go by type and era.

It is generally the stuff from the 1960's and earlier, almost always tubes, and almost always AM or the era of AM.

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GW3OQK
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« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2014, 12:50:53 AM »

I dislike the term and never use it.  My shack has old, vintage, historic, and classic gear to bring me joy. I'm an ancient mariner and its dreadful to think of dropping an old radio in the sea. Use the proper device instead.
73, Andrew
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K8AXW
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« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2014, 07:51:40 AM »

OQK:  5UP would probably disagree with you saying that a Heathsh.t DX-100 on the end of a chain would be a "proper device."  LOL
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KG8LB
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« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 09:14:08 AM »

OQK:  5UP would probably disagree with you saying that a Heathsh.t DX-100 on the end of a chain would be a "proper device."  LOL

   And he at the other end of the chain ? Cheesy
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KE6EE
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« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 10:28:49 AM »

The term "boat anchor" is really not appropriate for old gear. It's an ugly and incorrect term I think.

Especially if you, like me, grew up with beautiful, emotionally evocative tube and transformer gear with a single control for every function. A most attractive producer of heat and light; a magical portal into the ether. Turn it on and get set for an extended period of warming up and knob twisting. Nothing automatic or computerized. A tuning dial with an image that suggesting an adventure into undiscovered territory (such as the frequency you are on).

A bit of context: if the density of a "boat anchor" is about 40 lbs. per cubic foot, that means that the device will float in water (density of water is about 60 lbs. per cubic foot). An anchor that floats.

A "boat anchor" is not a boat anchor.
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N4NYY
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« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2014, 10:34:08 AM »

Tubes and weight (hence boatanchor). So most pre solid-state rigs.

Granted, that is us. If your a kid of 25 year of age, a transistor radio from the 1970's might be considered a boat anchor.
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K2OWK
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« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2014, 12:42:52 PM »

Thanks for the answers. It gives me some idea to what a boat anchor refers to.

73s

K2OWK
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G3RZP
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« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2014, 01:24:46 PM »

A 'boat anchor' can also be a much loved piece of equipment sought after by collectors but with performance horrendous by today's standards - such as the WW2 spy sets like the B2 or the AMkIII, which had receivers no better than BC sets - probably outperformed by the Hallicrafters S38!
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KG8LB
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« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2014, 03:41:34 AM »

A 'boat anchor' can also be a much loved piece of equipment sought after by collectors but with performance horrendous by today's standards - such as the WW2 spy sets like the B2 or the AMkIII, which had receivers no better than BC sets - probably outperformed by the Hallicrafters S38!

   Then again , the fellow who owns a 1929 Bantam Roadster or 1938 Morgan 3 wheeler or  even a 1930 Bugatti is not planning on outrunning a 2014 Ford Mustang ...but his car is and will be far more valuable for many years to come . Wink
It isn't always about pure performance . The experience has it's own appeal and value . If we could only operate the newer appliances or SDR , I would walk away from ham radio instantly . The new stuff has zero appeal to some of us .
« Last Edit: March 03, 2014, 03:48:16 AM by KG8LB » Logged
G3RZP
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« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2014, 12:58:26 AM »

I do have a new amplifier, but a 30 year old transceiver to drive it......Must resurrect the Drake TR3  from the 1960s sometime.
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