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Author Topic: FT 817/817ND outboard CW filter??  (Read 5563 times)
W1JKA
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Posts: 1679




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« on: March 03, 2014, 07:24:50 AM »

Seeking any input/observations from any FT 817 [CW side] owners that use or may have used the less expensive outboard audio type CW filters (NESCAF ,HiPerMite etc..) in lieu of the more expensive W4RT/Collins band pass type on board options.Thanks
« Last Edit: March 03, 2014, 07:35:29 AM by W1JKA » Logged
AF6WL
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Posts: 142




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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2014, 07:58:27 AM »

If you want to filter because the bands are full of signals - beware that the AGC will be driven by all signals in the  IF bandwidth.
However one trick you can still play is to use IF offset to reduce your bandwidth - push and hold CLAR

Long term - the 500Hz CW filter is worth every penny.
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W7ASA
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Posts: 235




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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2014, 12:47:29 PM »

I have a 300 Hz IF filter in my FT-817.  It makes ALL THE DIFFERENCE in the world for CW.  I highly encourage anyone with an 817 who is a CW operator to consider this as the FIRST option to be installed.  Audio filters are good and have their place. However, IF filtering should be your first choice, because the much narrower band width increases your signal to noise ratio tremendously at IF frequencies while it -of course- reduces interference.  If, after this, you add a good audio filter, you will be a happy brass-pounder indeed!


My Two Cents Worth (please adjust for hyper-inflation.)
>Ray
W7ASA ..._  ._

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WA9UAA
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Posts: 315




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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2014, 08:08:39 AM »

Here is a well regarded outboard CW filter. http://www.4sqrp.com/HiPerMite.php  73, Rob WA9UAA
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W1JKA
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Posts: 1679




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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 09:01:04 AM »

Re: WA9UAA

Yes, I know why the HiPerMite is well regarded, I have two which I use on my K1, MFJ and SW Labs QRP rigs. I have built two other more expensive kit filters and with the exception of an Autec QF-1A on my IC-7200 the HiPerMite is best for my ears. Neither myself or a few of my nearby QRP friends own a FT-817 to try any type of these filters out on.Thanks
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WB0FDJ
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Posts: 143




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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2014, 09:07:52 AM »

I own a SCAF-1 by Idiom Press and did experiment a bit with my FT-817. It cleaned up some of the annoying hiss and audio artifacts and for casual operating in the clear it helped. But the 500 Hz is really the way to go for a crowded band.

The SCAF-1 now has a permanent place on my Argonaut 509 which would require surgery to place an IF filter. Makes a real difference when there's nothing else.

WB0FDJ Doc 73
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AG6WT
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Posts: 448




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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2014, 01:11:06 PM »

New FT-817 owner here with a SSB filter, considering getting a CW filter.

If I buy a 500Hz filter, would also using a SCAF-1 help for trying to pull out weaker CW signal, or would it work at cross purposes, adding ringing or a hollow sound?
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K0OD
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« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2014, 11:30:56 AM »

Quote
New FT-817 owner here with a SSB filter, considering getting a CW filter.

If I buy a 500Hz filter, would also using a SCAF-1 help for trying to pull out weaker CW signal, or would it work at cross purposes, adding ringing or a hollow sound?

What's your goal? DXing, contesting, or just ragchewing? There's a lot to be said for keeping a station simple. Fewer gizmos mean fewer RF and connection problems. Extreme selectivity could cause you to miss a station calling off frequency. Your brain can be a pretty good audio filter. Some contesters prefer wider filters. Plus It's not like the bands are that crowded nowadays.

Years ago I contested with a TS-850 years ago equipped with a Kenwood 270 Hz filter. I found that an outboard Timewave DSP-9, even in its 100 Hz bandwidth position, helped very little and I soon discontinued using it.

OTOH, I've  discovered that the old Timewave was of immense benefit to my OHR-100A $150 kit radio that I sometimes use for QRP contesting. The Timewave is back on the operating desk.

To answer your question: The outboard filters I've used don't cause ringing or a hollow sound. But ultra sharp filters can add undesirable fuzziness to high speed CW because high speed CW is wider than slow speed. I own a Flex-5000 which allows the creation of custom brick wall filters. For CW I usually tune in a bandwidth of 250 Hz on the main DX bands during contests. Otherwise 500 Hz is fine.   
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KU3X
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Posts: 142




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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2014, 09:26:03 AM »

Save your lunch money, sell you blood or do whatever it takes but there is nothing like a CW filter inside the radio. Audio filters DO NOT narrow the pass band, they
only work with audio. I have two each Datong FL 3 audio filters and I still find them useful. But first you need a filter in the radio. Hunt and pounce, your choice
should be 350 hz or less. Send CQ, then a 400 or 500 hz filter is your choice.

For what you are going to spend for a quality outboard audio filter, you'll come close to what a good mechanical filter will cost.

Barry
www.ku3x.net
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