Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: can you multitask while working cw?  (Read 13750 times)
KF7ATL
Member

Posts: 54




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: May 12, 2014, 08:53:08 PM »

I can't do that yet, but there is a fellow in my ARC who can. He can copy 30 wpm while carrying on an eyeball QSO with a person in the room. My goal is to do that too. Maybe not tomorrow, but someday!
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3910




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2014, 08:14:24 AM »

CW multitasking isn't something that is accomplished by learning or deliberate practice./i] 

Multitasking comes about by spending countless hours using code.  Listening to code becomes something that goes on in your head that basically you have little control over.

For example, you're watching a war movie on TV and in the background is a radio operator sending or receiving code.  The mind will actually hear and understand this code while you're still following the plot of the movie.

Morse intercept operators go through the same learning process as anyone else. 
The difference is that these operators spend 8 hours a day, 40 or more hours a week absorbed in copying code. 

They not only hear and copy code they also learn "fists" and many other personal  characteristics of operators on the whole net they are copying. 

Some have described copying code as an "art form."  I would have to give that a lot of thought before agreeing but will say it is a mode of communication that has great depth. We learn two simple sounds that the brain can understand and take this to areas seemingly without end.

I feel that those who refer to Morse Code as archaic simply don't understand the total concept of this mode of communication.
Logged
ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 402




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2014, 11:44:13 PM »

Well, we used to multi task.

Sat there for some times a long day just taking QTC's and a group of others around you, you soon learned to flick one side of the phones off and chat with your neighbour.

There is cartoon of the place showing all the little groups of like minded people, gardening, DIY, Open University.... ham Radio, we all tended to sit together.

When the tea trolley came round, if you could not order your bacon roll and cupa and dish out the money get the change while still taking traffic, you quickly lost weight and became thirsty.

It is sheer practise, that makes it easier.

Heard once of a op that could take the wx coded forecast and plot it straight onto the weather  charts, I never saw this, but could quite believe it.

But there were the situations where there would be 2 of you trying to copy the same op, for a variety of reasons, then it was both ears on and shutup, imn busy.

Then there were the jobs where you were packed away into a quite position on your own.  The Trawler watch was one, and the night time pacific ships watch were another, quite nice sitting there calling CQ DX Pacific with a good few KW's and a big LP all to yourself.



Hope this link works
Logged

ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
GILGSN
Member

Posts: 207




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2014, 09:53:21 AM »

I can't even scratch my nose while copying Morse code! I don't think I could even pee at the same time.. The slightest distraction makes me miss entire words. I've been practicing for a year-and-a-half, up to 20wpm now. I wish I could listen casually while decoding, but it takes all my brain power, save for a few brain cells necessary for heartbeat and breathing..

Gil.
Logged
KE6EE
Member

Posts: 410




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: May 20, 2014, 04:42:37 PM »

Multitasking comes about by spending countless hours using code.  Listening to code becomes something that goes on in your head that basically you have little control over.

Morse intercept operators go through the same learning process as anyone else.  
The difference is that these operators spend 8 hours a day, 40 or more hours a week absorbed in copying code.  

They not only hear and copy code they also learn "fists" and many other personal  characteristics of operators on the whole net they are copying.  

I...will say it is a mode of communication that has great depth. We learn two simple sounds that the brain can understand and take this to areas seemingly without end.

I feel that those who refer to Morse Code as archaic simply don't understand the total concept of this mode of communication.

These are most useful comments.

We seem to live in an age which puts a high value on multitasking without understanding how people learn and differences between superficial learning and deep mastery of a skill.

Learning is a process of neural development. People's brains differ in their abilities to learn various tasks. On the other hand learning is for everyone fundamentally a process of focus of attention rather than of multitasking.

When you focus on a task and repeat it in countless subtle variations you develop a rich new network of neural connections. Such that you not only can "read" code letter by letter but progressively word by word and then phrase by phrase. Not only this but deep focus and lots of time listening can bring perception of very fine aspects of sending, so that recognizing individual fists is automatic even when keying is electronic--spacing between characters and character groups varies from one op to another.

A more useful discussion in the same direction as the original post, which I think has to do with evidence of mastery of telegraphy skills, would be to look closely at the details of the art as revealed during deep, singular focus on the skills rather than on multitasking.
Logged
ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 402




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2014, 04:56:56 PM »

I can't even scratch my nose while copying Morse code! I don't think I could even pee at the same time.. The slightest distraction makes me miss entire words. I've been practicing for a year-and-a-half, up to 20wpm now. I wish I could listen casually while decoding, but it takes all my brain power, save for a few brain cells necessary for heartbeat and breathing..

Gil.

For while we were trudging across a part of the world where the wx forecasts we all in french, obviously in cw.  Now sending a forecast up to the bridge all in french was sure way to get the old man's attention, so I used to sit there with my pocket dictionary and translate it, anyway as time went by, I was eventually able to copy the french cw forecast and type it straight out in english.  It is just a question of day in day out doing it.

Christmas, Mothers day, Valentines day were all big periods for traffic, and if you were really busy you might instead of having the variety of jobs that were on the duty sheet for your particular rota, be all day on HF.  So it could have been an 8 -5 sat there on point whatever, ship after ship, just taking and sending traffic.

Mind you there were some ships, that defied the laws of morse, you could generally tell these had been round a couple of times, by the swearing that you could hear about XYZ idiot.


A picture of the gates in, it used to be manic at around 1700 as the days left and the 5 - 11 arrived.

https://www.google.co.nz/search?q=portishead+radio+pictures&rlz=1C1CHKB_en-GBNZ418NZ418&es_sm=93&tbm=isch&imgil=pfhpt5J_Ea5OnM%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcSrNMDyeSXO-K-f77y1_Fl5ohnozDDGVy1P_7JZ7ZGm0AI0eWpgpw%253B375%253B279%253BdSfbr4odjHOp5M%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fcoastradio.info%25252Fphoto.html&source=iu&usg=__fnV1PNk0EG7WDHl00ci8y1vXsBo%3D&sa=X&ei=a-t7U9DULdPGuAS8oYHoBw&ved=0CDcQ9QEwBg#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=pfhpt5J_Ea5OnM%253A%3BdSfbr4odjHOp5M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fcoastradio.info%252Fimages%252Fother%252Fportisheadradio.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fcoastradio.info%252Fphoto.html%3B375%3B279
Logged

ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3910




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2014, 05:12:08 PM »

BBW:  Thanks for the FANTASTIC link!!  This one will take an evening to get through!!  Beautiful photos....great videos as well at first glance!!
Logged
ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 402




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2014, 06:50:42 PM »

BBW:  Thanks for the FANTASTIC link!!  This one will take an evening to get through!!  Beautiful photos....great videos as well at first glance!!
I did not know that it would put all that lot on there  Smiley

the one 5 rows down and 2 in from the left is the old R/T room, we had i think 6 channels running in there, 3 ops 2 each.  But at night you would be on your own unless, the doodies hit the fan.

The one thing that the photo's do not give away is the tremendous camaraderie that there was there, nearly 300 ops at one time, so it was a big place.  Some of the "funnier" times still make me laugh.  We had the bomb squad round for an un identified case, anyway no owned up to it, so it was dutifully carefully removed and ignited, with a shower of sandwiches going up, one op had left his case behind off nights I think, ah well happy days.

We were all on best behaviour for the videos  Grin
Logged

ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
N3QE
Member

Posts: 2305




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: May 21, 2014, 08:42:12 AM »

I do pretty well with things that don't involve talking or listening to voice at same time as doing CW. i.e. things I can do with my hands (if not sending!) and eyes.

But if I have to talk or listen to others in same room... pretty much impossible for me.

I think the part of my brain that does voice communications with mouth and ears, is the same part that does CW, and it cannot do both at same time.
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3910




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2014, 10:13:49 AM »

BBW: 

Quote
The one thing that the photo's do not give away is the tremendous camaraderie that there was there, nearly 300 ops at one time, so it was a big place.  Some of the "funnier" times still make me laugh.

I've never been in a room of 300 ops but maybe 20-25.... but any time you have a group of like minded, similarly talented men thrown together there is going to be camaraderie...and funny times.

One thing that was frowned upon and even feared was falling asleep on the "Last Trick," which was from 23.00 to 07.00.  If you did fall asleep you could bet that you'd wind up with a "hot foot!" Or at the very least your boot laces tied together in a very tight knot.

(For those unfamiliar with the term, a "hot foot" consists of two or three matches with the heads jammed between one's boot sole and leather upper.  The wood matches are ignited and when the flame reaches the match heads they ignite with the result of one very hot foot....usually with the victim jumping up and down in a frantic dance trying to put out the fire and an involuntary attempt to relieve the pain)

One night an operator who was half in the bag became innovative and jammed both boots down into a waste basket to eliminate access to his boots.  Someone simply ignited the paper in the waste basket and when he woke up flames were up past his knees.  THAT dance was something to behold!!  The following verbal performance was classical in itself.
Logged
ZL1BBW
Member

Posts: 402




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: May 21, 2014, 12:30:32 PM »

 :DThe last shift in our week was 99% of the time a 0800 to 1300 then back at 2300 till 0800.  It was a B... killer, I hated them.

Anyway sometimes we would have the offer of job n go, if it was a big day and there we 100's of QTC to go to say Interflora, I would normally have a crack at that, because if you got on, you could be off at 0500, imagine typing up on tape, having the tape laid out up and down the floor of wing I dont know 150 feet long, then when you had enough built up, you would dial up on another teleprinter put the tape through and keep typing into the other end, if you got it right it never caught up on you  Shocked

Normally we were pretty busy until 0200 picking up the last of evening ships, sometimes the station would run at QRY 30 on a band, even though they were being worked as fast as they could be.  Then it would settle down until 0600 when the PG started up.

We were obviously not all there at once, but on a busy day  there heaps of you around.

We all used to get and extended tea break of an hour during the night, that way you were not too knackered when 16Mhz came to life in the early morning.  We had one guy pull three of the roll along chairs together, and he fell asleep on those, he  was forever known as "XYX three chairs".

Happy days, looking back I feel sorry for the overseers, they were meant to be in charge of this rebellious rabble of an army on a hour to hour basis, but we out gunned them in every way.
Logged

ex MN Radio Officer, Portishead Radio GKA, BT Radio Amateur Morse Tester.  Licensed as G3YCP ZL1DAB, now taken over my father (sk) call as ZL1BBW.
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3910




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: May 21, 2014, 03:51:35 PM »

Quote
they were meant to be in charge of this rebellious rabble of an army on a hour to hour basis, but we out gunned them in every way.
 

LOL..... Like trying to drain the swamp when you're up to your butt in alligators!  Great fun and the job got done!!
Logged
NO2A
Member

Posts: 806




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: May 21, 2014, 07:09:03 PM »

To an extent,yes,but the idea is I go to the radio room to get away from everything else. Otherwise why be on the radio? if you really want to see some serious multitasking,watch a disc jockey in action.
Logged
K8AXW
Member

Posts: 3910




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2014, 08:59:29 AM »

2A:  You're right on that!!  Worked at a radio station for 5 years and was always impressed with the ways these guys operated a half dozen problems at once!

But, like CW multitasking.....after you watch a jock for awhile you can see that he's operating on automatic most of the time......he's not actually concentrating or focused on one particular thing.

They quite often reminded me of an orchestra leader.
Logged
N2EY
Member

Posts: 3895




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: May 22, 2014, 09:22:24 AM »

Yes, I can multitask while operating CW. Been that way for years.

Of course it depends on the task. I can't talk and send CW at the exact same time. But I can listen to CW and do other things easily.

CW operating isn't one skill. It's a whole set of skills, and they're learned by doing.

73 de Jim, N2EY
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!