Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 8 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Consider Linux  (Read 28871 times)
KE6TDP
Member

Posts: 32


WWW

Ignore
« on: March 16, 2014, 11:24:20 AM »

The April 2014 edition of QST carried the story "Windows XP - Goodby, Old Friend" by Mike Carper (WA9PIE), a very timely article. But it also raised the question, why stick with MS Windows?  From the hobby perspective, Linux would be a superior solution. In fact the April edition of QST carried a companion article "A Tiny Python Panadapter", which is Linux based. I would encourage the amateur radio community to put MS Windows aside in favour of Linux.
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 1279




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2014, 03:38:13 PM »

I've used Linux in the past, but I doubt any of the ham radio programs I'm using now have Linux versions, so that pretty much kills it for me.  Undecided
Logged
N7ZAL
Member

Posts: 40


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2014, 06:34:41 PM »

I've tried it but many of the programs I use aren't available in Linux.
Logged

Later, Bill N7ZAL (ex. WA2DPB, WB3BOC, N2FWS)
K5TED
Member

Posts: 780




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2014, 07:47:28 PM »



I would encourage Linux evangelists to spend some time making Linux attractive to general PC users.
Logged
VK6IS
Member

Posts: 99




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2014, 06:19:26 AM »

some M$ programs work using WINE.

- which has a good list of programs, abet mainly games, but also other stuff, as well.

the commercial version is Crossover:
https://www.codeweavers.com/products/windowsmac/

- you can search for your program, in their search bar, to see if their extensive list has it.
& then test to see how well it runs. ..
- they are based in St. Paul, Minnesota.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6055




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2014, 06:21:01 AM »

There are Windows emulator programs made for the Linux environment that will support a good deal of the software written just for Windows, one version of which is WINE. 

A suggestion could be made that those could be looked into.  They do work most of the time.
Logged
W0BTU
Member

Posts: 1801


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2014, 06:36:05 AM »

I run lots of Windows software under WINE with no problems.

There are Windows programs that won't. N1MM logger comes to mind. It requires some sort of Windows-only database.
Logged

AG6WT
Member

Posts: 475




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2014, 06:37:30 AM »



I would encourage Linux evangelists to spend some time making Linux attractive to general PC users.


They have. Popular Linux distributions like Ubuntu work right out of the box on most PCs and include commercial grade office suites like Libre Office (a MS Office clone), Adobe Reader, Firefox and Chrome, as well as plenty of games. I started using Linux back in the early '90s and back then you often had to hack the kernel to get hardware to work right and there were very, very few GUI apps that worked well. Even Netscape Navigator didn't work without some serious tweaking. Linux has come a long way.
Logged
WA9PIE
Member

Posts: 86


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2014, 10:12:43 AM »

All,

Thanks for reading the article. I've received a number of emails from folks who have said that I didn't dedicate much time in the article to "considering Linux as an alternative."  (Same could be said for Mac OS X, but there's only so much you can do in two pages.)

Keep in mind, the article wasn't written to advocate for Linux… or Windows 8… or Mac OS X… Chrome (on a Chromebook)… or anything like that.

The article was written to (a) remind folks that support for XP is ending and (b) help them understand the implications of extending their use of XP.

I may follow with an article that looks at other OS choices more closely, but would likely give Linux as much  attention as Mac OS X… Windows 7/8… and so on.

Mike, WA9PIE
Logged
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2014, 03:47:47 PM »

Many of you complain that Linux does not support the programs you currently use.  Let's look at this claim in three parts.

Firstly, Linux has a different set of programs that may look and work a bit differently, but support most of the activities that you do with your Windows software.  Logging, rig control, I/Q panadapter, SDR, and so forth are all well supported with mature programs that have existed (for some packages) for up to two decades.  Configuration is a bit different but device interfaces are generally more reliable with Linux.

Secondly, Linux supports a software package called Wine.  Wine allows you to run your Windows programs in Linux with a very minimal one-time setup procedure that looks and works identically to the Windows installer itself.  It is compatible with the vast majority of Windows software at this point.

Thirdly, Linux supports several virtualization packages like VirtualBox or VMWare.  These programs essentially create a PC inside your PC, which takes advantage of the hardware virtualization support of most relatively current Intel processors to run any OS you'd like at full speed, in a window.  These virtualization packages also support checkpointing your OS's virtualized drives, so that you can take a snapshot of the entire virtual computer and roll back any changes whenever you wish.  If you get a virus, or your virtual hard drive is erased somehow, you can roll back any changes with a single click.

Of course, you can always stay on the endless Windows upgrade treadmill, where your software will likely quit working anyway, but the beauty of Linux is that security patches are available for most system components indefinitely, and if they are not, you have the source code so you can always do it yourself or hire somebody to patch it.

There's a Linux distribution that you can burn to a CD and run directly off your CD-ROM drive without installing to your hard drive called Andy's Ham Radio Linux, that is custom tailored to ham radio and includes tons of useful nice amateur radio related software installed by default.  Before you just write off Linux because it doesn't support a particular software package that you happen to enjoy, give it a fair shake.  It's a more stable and long-term supported OS than Microsoft makes.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 04:22:53 PM by KE7TMA » Logged
KE6TDP
Member

Posts: 32


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2014, 03:51:06 PM »

I would encourage Linux evangelists to spend some time making Linux attractive to general PC users.
That's the "rub". Instead of developing MS Windows based software, develop Linux based software. An unfortunate aspect with Linux development has been that MS Windows is pretty much universal, everyone has it.  Hopefully, the Linux market share will grow.

PS: Synaptic Package Manager has an "Amateur Radio" category. 
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 03:57:17 PM by KE6TDP » Logged
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2014, 03:54:59 PM »

I would encourage Linux evangelists to spend some time making Linux attractive to general PC users.
That's the "rub". Instead of developing MS Windows based software, develop Linux based software. An unfortunate aspect with Linux development has been that MS Windows is pretty much universal, everyone has it.  Hopefully, the Linux market share will grow.

I think that many Linux users like Linux more or less the way it is.  There is no amount of Windows-ification that can be done to please the fussiest Windows users so they will always have some excuse or another.  At this point, though, driver support is better than Windows for most devices, setup is extremely simple and excepting bizarre hardware totally automated, and the GUIs can be made to mimic Windows or even the Macintosh so closely that people would feel right at home after a day or so.

It's not Linux's loss when people fail to give it a fair shake - it's the user's loss.
Logged
KE6TDP
Member

Posts: 32


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2014, 04:00:44 PM »

It's not Linux's loss when people fail to give it a fair shake - it's the user's loss.(emphasis added)
Excellent point.
Logged
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2014, 04:27:15 PM »

I run lots of Windows software under WINE with no problems.

There are Windows programs that won't. N1MM logger comes to mind. It requires some sort of Windows-only database.

It's possible that one might install this Windows-only database software in WINE before one installs N1MM.  If you file a bug report with the WINE developers they might just hop right to it and figure out the issue - they take pride in their software and are very responsive to bug reports and feature requests.  Good luck.
Logged
N5INP
Member

Posts: 1279




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2014, 04:57:17 PM »

Guys -

I've used Ubuntu Linux in the past and it worked OK - 'cept when it came to getting drivers for obscure hardware (or even non-obscure hardware  Undecided)

See, that's the rub. It ain't just running windows programs in a virtualbox or whatever - it's the drivers for stuff you have hanging off the PC like radio programming ports or DVB SDR dongles and the like.

Linux is not well supported for a lot of obscure drivers and I just ain't gonna bust my a** getting it to work with these things.  Smiley
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 8 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!