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Author Topic: Consider Linux? I did and ...  (Read 31829 times)
NN4RH
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Posts: 326




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« Reply #90 on: June 24, 2014, 04:26:22 PM »

I've had Linux (or BSD) on one or more of my computers since 1995.  It's a great hobby, and if you enjoy playing with computers, it's the way to go.  But I've settled on Windows for my main OS now because I'd rather spend my time doing other things and I generally prefer Windows applications.

Interesting. That's why I've moved away from Windows and gone to Linux. My time is valuable. I'd much rather spend it being productive, instead of dealing with an overweight, sluggish operating system that takes all day to boot up and even longer to shut down, buggy MS Office 2013 products that aren't even compatible with itself much with less other versions of MS Office, and MS Outlook that crashes if you try to put more than two people at a time on CC:   in an email.

With Linux the operating system stays out of my way and I can get some work done.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #91 on: June 24, 2014, 05:48:05 PM »

Interesting. That's why I've moved away from Windows and gone to Linux. My time is valuable. I'd much rather spend it being productive, instead of dealing with an overweight, sluggish operating system that takes all day to boot up and even longer to shut down, buggy MS Office 2013 products that aren't even compatible with itself much with less other versions of MS Office, and MS Outlook that crashes if you try to put more than two people at a time on CC:   in an email.

You must have one old Windows computer or you haven't tried it since Windows 3.1  Wink  I have plenty of experience with Windows writing C# software plus embedded C and assembly plus use Office for documentation and Outlook for e-mail. I haven't seen your type of problems since before XP was released.
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NN4RH
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« Reply #92 on: June 24, 2014, 06:43:20 PM »

Interesting. That's why I've moved away from Windows and gone to Linux. My time is valuable. I'd much rather spend it being productive, instead of dealing with an overweight, sluggish operating system that takes all day to boot up and even longer to shut down, buggy MS Office 2013 products that aren't even compatible with itself much with less other versions of MS Office, and MS Outlook that crashes if you try to put more than two people at a time on CC:   in an email.

You must have one old Windows computer or you haven't tried it since Windows 3.1  Wink  I have plenty of experience with Windows writing C# software plus embedded C and assembly plus use Office for documentation and Outlook for e-mail. I haven't seen your type of problems since before XP was released.


Nope. I have Windows 7 and Office 2013 at work right now on i7 computers with 12 GB RAM and SSD. It's not hardware. Office 2007 and 2010 always worked very well both between the two versions as well as with Office for Mac 2008 and 2011. Since I upgraded last month to Office 2013 I've had nothing but trouble. Incompatibilities with Mac Office. Incompatibilities with previous versions of Windows Office, and even incompatibilities between several different computers all with Office 2013. It's not even compatible with itself! And sluggish!

You're right about one thing - I haven't seen these kinds of problems with Office since before XP.

Tried Windows 8.  Got tired of the operating system getting in the way of doing useful work, so it went away and I installed Linux instead. Others in my division are going back to Macs or specifying WIndows 7 when they need to get new computers. When XP first came on the scene, a lot of us switched from Mac to Windows. Now there's a mass exodus going back and some fraction going over to Linux. I don't see very many eager to "upgrade" to Windows 8 or Office 2013. .  

If Windows 8 and Office 2013 are working well for you, then you must be very patient and not in much of a hurry to get things done, and not trying to do anything very complicated with Office.
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NN4RH
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« Reply #93 on: June 25, 2014, 03:06:54 AM »

Here's how the morning goes at work.

Windows 8 person gets in. Turns on the computer. Goes down the hall to the men's room.  By the time he gets back to his desk, the Windows user login screen might be up. Enters his password. Then goes down the hall to the kitchenette to make coffee, then on the way back to his office stops and chats with  office manager. Gets back to his desk again and then sits and waits for Windows to finish booting up, and prays that there's not 60 "security patches" that are going to force him to reboot again.

Linux or Mac person gets in. Turns on his computer. Password screen comes up instantaneously. Waits about 5 seconds for the boot process to finish. Workspace comes up immediately fully functional and he can get to work right away.
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NN4RH
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« Reply #94 on: June 25, 2014, 04:20:01 AM »

Computers are tools, not decorations.


Three computer users go into a Home Depot to buy a screwdriver.

The Linux guy knows exactly what is needed to get the job done. "I need a #3 Frearson screwdriver with case hardened steel blade and lightweight composite handle".

The Mac guy says, "I want one of those, too, but I want to pay twice as much for it as that other guy did".

The Windows guy, "I want a screwdriver. I don't care if it is the right kind or size, or how durable it is or how much it weights. But it has to be pretty, and the handle has to be too big."
« Last Edit: June 25, 2014, 04:22:08 AM by NN4RH » Logged
KF5VPK
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« Reply #95 on: June 25, 2014, 10:35:08 AM »

I've worked on and/or upgraded a number of different computers and operating systems for the past 30 years.

Each one has advantages and disadvantages. Weight the advantages and disadvantages.

Find the software you want to use, and buy a computer that uses it.
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W0BTU
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« Reply #96 on: June 25, 2014, 10:58:32 AM »

That's why I've moved away from Windows and gone to Linux. My time is valuable. I'd much rather spend it being productive, instead of dealing with an overweight, sluggish operating system that takes all day to boot up ...

You must have one old Windows computer or you haven't tried it since Windows 3.1  Wink  I have plenty of experience ... I haven't seen your type of problems since before XP was released.


I use several flavors of Linux (main one is Xubuntu) PLUS two machines running Windows 7 and one running XP Pro (which is the slowest machine I have in spite of the advanced hardware, dual-core Intel, 4-drive RAID 10, and 2GB.) I like them all.

HOWEVER, I have noticed that the two 64-bit Windows 7 machines are not near as fast as they were when they were new. The one that has more RAM (4 GB vs. 2 GB) and a faster processor (my wife's Win7 Pro, fairly recent AMD ? vs. my Celeron laptop) is actually much slower. My 2 GB Presario CQ62 laptop boots much faster than my wife's, but this month, it started using swap space on the HD which really slows it down sometimes. It never used to do that.

I don't know if this is due to the Win7 service packs and security updates or what. I'm a pretty security-conscious guy and have scanned them for malware. And it's not start-up programs, either. I don't know what it is, but I am considering switching my wife's machine to Mint or Xubuntu with Win7 Pro in a VM (or vice versa)

Anyone else have the gradually slowing Windows 7 problem?
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K1CJS
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« Reply #97 on: June 25, 2014, 11:53:26 AM »

...I don't know if this is due to the Win7 service packs and security updates or what. I'm a pretty security-conscious guy and have scanned them for malware. And it's not start-up programs, either. I don't know what it is, but I am considering switching my wife's machine to Mint or Xubuntu with Win7 Pro in a VM (or vice versa)

Anyone else have the gradually slowing Windows 7 problem?

I did, and I cured it.  I used Wise Care 365 (the free version) and cleaned out the files that store information for 'instant' retrieval.  Also 'junk' files created by the OS, applications, prefetch data, update files that aren't really needed once an update is done, cache files for whatever browser you use, stored webpages that supposedly make page retrieval faster, and so on.  I also get rid of files that Wise Care recommends--again none of which are really necessary to keep.  Remember also to clean out the 'Recycle bin.'  The registry holds keys to the programs and items in there to restore them in the event you deleted them accidently.  Once the recycle bin is empty, Wise Care will get rid of those keys when you clean the registry.

Then I defragment the hard drive--that's one thing that can slow even the fastest computer down considerably.

Once all that is done, I use Wise Care to scan the registry, getting rid of all the registry entries that point to programs and items that aren't there anymore.  (Such as the Recycle bin entries.)  Then defragment the registry using the defragmenter in Wise Care.

All this, considering that the computer is virus free, will speed up the system boot to near it's original speed.

One other thing that I've found is that the startup menu can be adjusted by that same program to end the automatic starting of programs that aren't really needed or used, but are still held in memory for 'instant' use.

While we're at it, I also use a program that's called 'Belarc Advisor.'  It tells what's going on in the computer system, what major programs are installed along with their product keys, if there's any needed updates that are missing, and so on.  Belarc can also help you if you're getting error messages by telling you (in a round about way) what's needed to get rid of them.

Hope this helps, and 73!

Added--BTW, my boot speed on an older Dell Optiplex 620 with a dual core 3.4 GHZ Intel processor and 2 GB memory is under a minute--around 48 seconds, give or take.  73!
« Last Edit: June 25, 2014, 11:58:11 AM by K1CJS » Logged
W0BTU
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« Reply #98 on: July 14, 2014, 04:03:17 AM »

I did, and I cured it. ...

Thanks, Chris! I've used CCleaner on other machines, but never heard of these. I'll try this after I do a backup (which is overdue).
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N8AUC
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Posts: 79




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« Reply #99 on: July 15, 2014, 06:57:28 AM »

Computers are tools, not decorations.


Three computer users go into a Home Depot to buy a screwdriver.

The Linux guy knows exactly what is needed to get the job done. "I need a #3 Frearson screwdriver with case hardened steel blade and lightweight composite handle".

The Mac guy says, "I want one of those, too, but I want to pay twice as much for it as that other guy did".

The Windows guy, "I want a screwdriver. I don't care if it is the right kind or size, or how durable it is or how much it weights. But it has to be pretty, and the handle has to be too big."

Now THAT was funny! Thankfully I wasn't taking a sip of coffee when I read it, or you would owe me a new keyboard.

Thanks for the laugh!!!

73 de N8AUC
Eric
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