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Author Topic: Is the Begali Intrepid a real Bug?  (Read 12951 times)
N4DSP
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« on: May 14, 2014, 03:21:56 PM »

This "bug" performs more like one of Piero's dual paddles requiring no wrist action but dainty finger presses. It has a reed with two small weights but traditionally this is not how a bug is used.

Designed in the 21st century one has to use an external keyer to operate it in bug mode. My Kenwood 590S requires an external keyer to use it but gladly accepts a traditional bug like the Frattini J-36 with a Bug Jack. Is the Intrepid truly a bug?

« Last Edit: May 14, 2014, 03:28:48 PM by N4DSP » Logged
N6GND
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2014, 03:41:39 PM »

No wrist action is required...it has a reed with two small weights but traditionally this is not how a bug is used...one has to use an external keyer to operate it in bug mode.
Is this truly a bug?

True, it can be set up for relatively small lever travel compared to most other bugs probably, but not for the tiny amount of travel some paddle users prefer. You still have to provide sufficient energy to the pendulum. Set up more or less like another bug it can be swatted with plenty of energy. It's nice and heavy.

It's not unusual for a bug to have two smaller weights rather than one larger one. My 1930s McElroy has two small weights. Small weights make it easier to do fine speed adjustments within a limited overall speed range.

I use my Intrepid bug like any other bug--plugged in as if it were a straight key. The dit and dah contacts are separate and isolated from the base (pendulum) so they have to be wired together to do this. I don't think it would be a problem to use the Intrepid as a paddle by setting it up appropriately.

You don't have to run the Intrepid through any sort of keyer, but it may be advantageous to do so depending on whether your rig's keying circuit provides sufficient debounce. Some Intrepid users put a small cap across the bug to do this for for their rigs. I don't have any problem keying my K2 with the Intrepid but I have a practice oscillator which can produce nasty dits with this key.

Truly a bug and one of the best.
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N4DSP
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Posts: 153




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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2014, 05:38:00 PM »

Interesting and useful comments GND.

Most appreciative.

john
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N6GND
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Posts: 379




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« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2014, 10:03:24 PM »

This seven minute video showing all adjustments on the Intrepid may be interesting to you.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Df3JLHdW2Z4
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N4DSP
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2014, 09:48:34 AM »

So Mike how did you wire the Intrepid for straight key? There is a red, white, and a grounded shield under the base.

john
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N6GND
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2014, 10:54:23 AM »

I didn't use the provided cord. I used light guage zip cord. Easier to work with than two conductor shielded cord. The two terminals underneath from the dit and dah rails are tied together under the base and go to the tip of a stereo plug. The central terminal which is the ground goes to the ground on the plug. The ring on the plug is not used.

Using the provided cord, I would either put a new stereo plug on it with both red and white going to the tip of the plug or, at the other end of the cord, cut whichever wire (red or white) goes to the ring and run a jumper between dit and dah rails.
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PA1ZP
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« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2014, 01:45:53 PM »

Hi to you all

The Intrepid is like some other keys of dear Pietro Begali, not a bug or key but a work of mechanicle and design art in all ways.

i do not have a Begali , because i can not affort them.
But there are beautiful things made in his workshop, that outrise craftmenship to pure ART.

73 Jos
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N4DSP
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2014, 11:46:17 AM »

While searching for books on Keys I ran into Dave Ingram's book titled "Keys IV, and more The Finale".
The front cover shows six beautiful keys and one called The Flysender looks remarkably similar to the Begali Intrepid.

Anyone know the history of the Flysender?

john
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N6GND
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« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2014, 12:57:34 PM »

"Flysender" or "fly sender" is, I think, a general term used in Europe for fast-sending operators. The possibility of a common linguistic path between the terms "fly sender" and "bug" are interesting. On the other hand it's possible that the terms came into use separately and just happened to end up having a connection in English.

The Begali Intrepid-like bug on the cover of Ingram's book could be a prototype of the current Intrepid model. Ingram's book has a photo of another Begali key, a straight key, which is similar to but not the same as Begali's current Camelback key.
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I2RTF
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« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2014, 12:22:19 AM »

The "Flysender" was just a prototype of "Intrepid".
Made some years early, then many times improved before to put in the market.
73,      Piero
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PA0WV
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« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2014, 01:09:06 PM »

Hahaha Is the intrepid a real bug?

Look at the demo at you tube the first not existing character  demonstrated was daaaaaaaaaaaah     dududududu daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah. Heard that I changed immediately the website.

World champions come from Eastern Europe, with a home brew key, not with B-keys, and the duplication efforts of holy celebrated B. - and free handing out to top CW-ers - did even  not make a key which approaches the original home brew design in combination with the champion-user.

You can't obviously  interchange real proficiency with proudly ownership of super expensive keys to impress your friends.

I can easily afford to buy  one instance of all models Begali keys together, because I am not so stupid to purchase that kind of merchandise.

Impress your friends with proficiency on a simple key; showing an expensive key and telling what you are going to do when you master finally all characters is embarrassing for the listeners to your message.

gd luck.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2014, 01:28:46 PM by PA0WV » Logged

Using an appliance without CW is just CB
N6GND
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Posts: 379




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« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2014, 03:07:34 PM »

World champions come from Eastern Europe, with a home brew key...

You can't obviously  interchange real proficiency with proudly ownership of super expensive keys to impress your friends.

Impress your friends with proficiency on a simple key...

I'm impressed by the world champions who make their own keys.

My friends really don't give a damn about telegraph keys or what I do with them. I also am not interested in impressing my friends. I like to think of friends as people I don't have to impress--people I like and vice-versa.

I am impressed by Piero Begali's skills as a designer and craftsman. His keys don't make me a better CW op. I sent him a couple of checks for a couple of keys. This made me happy and I think made him happy too.

Maybe friendship actually has something to do with mutual happiness.
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N4DSP
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« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2014, 07:09:52 AM »

Hahaha Is the intrepid a real bug?


;>))
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N4DSP
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Posts: 153




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« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2014, 07:13:49 AM »

The "Flysender" was just a prototype of "Intrepid".
Made some years early, then many times improved before to put in the market.
73,      Piero

Piero, the book I mentioned is no longer available in a pdf and it is not going to be published. Can you provide information and some history on this prototype.

73,   John
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N4DSP
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Posts: 153




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« Reply #14 on: July 02, 2014, 07:34:51 AM »



You can't obviously  interchange real proficiency with proudly ownership of super expensive keys to impress your friends.

I can easily afford to buy  one instance of all models Begali keys together, because I am not so stupid to purchase that kind of merchandise.

Impress your friends with proficiency on a simple key; showing an expensive key and telling what you are going to do when you master finally all characters is embarrassing for the listeners to your message.

gd luck.

It is unfortunate and a testament to yourself that you have prejudged many who appreciate finely machined CW sending machines and an insult to Piero stating "you are not so stupid to purchase that kind of merchandise". Humility is a flower that does not grow in everyone's garden.

My occupation for 35 years has been in clock repair. I have repaired and rebuilt or restored many fine pieces from France, Germany, and the United States. I know quality craftsmanship and enjoy restoring these fine pieces. To prejudge and state the ownership of these super expensive keys is merely to impress one's friends is unfortunate the way you see it. We appreciate the quality and beauty of these works of art which Piero and Alberto produce very much like what I see in a beautifully designed and machined clock movement.

It is obvious you take great pride in being capable of copying 40 wpm for a solid minute. I can never achieve that nor have the desire to do so. Sending at a conversational speed of 22wpm with a beautifully designed and crafted sending machine is a joy for me.

Good Luck to you!

John
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