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Author Topic: Still using XP??  (Read 35524 times)
AA4PB
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« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2014, 06:49:28 PM »

My old, slow XP laptop had twice the memory and twice the processor speed as the Microsoft specified minimums for Windows7. I went ahead and upgraded it to Windows7. I don't notice any difference in performance. It worked fine before and it works fine now.

My wife uses an older XP machine that is NOT compatible with Windows7 or 8. She uses it to access e-mail and facebook so for now I plan on leaving it running XP rather than spending the money to purchase a new computer. If Norton stops supporting XP then I'll have to reconsider at that point.

My understanding is that most ATM machines are running XP. However, those are running on the inside of a hardware VPN so they aren't exposed to the Internet.

In my opinion, it all depends on what XP machine you have and what you are doing with it. If it's doing what you need it to do then I don't see any reason to panic and replace it just because it is no longer receiving Microsoft updates.

By the way, SP3 was released in April of 2008 so you could say that XP is only 8 years old if you've kept it up to date.
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W9CLL
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« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2014, 08:06:17 PM »

Micro$oft is still supporting XP but you need to pay a fee and must have over a certain amount of systems I.e corporate systems.
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K5TED
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« Reply #17 on: May 19, 2014, 08:41:44 PM »

Just built a new Global Tuners super node with two Icom  PCR-1500's integrated into the tower case, running XP Pro, Pentium dual core 3.4GHz, 4GB RAM and a 60GB SSD. No qualms.
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K1CJS
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« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2014, 06:28:49 AM »

Anybody remember Y2K?  Wink

Excellent point!  All too many people were all hyped up.....  over nothing!
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AE4RV
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« Reply #19 on: May 20, 2014, 11:36:17 AM »

Anybody remember Y2K?  Wink

Excellent point!  All too many people were all hyped up.....  over nothing!

It wasn't nothing. People worked for years on that*. They fixed Y2K before it was an issue. With XP, the opposite is true - people are no longer fixing it. Also, with Y2K we knew right away that all was well. The date came and went, and our power, money, telephones all still worked. And if a problem did crop up we knew someone would be there to fix it. Not so with XP - they've stopped fixing it.

Sure, for the near term there is not much to worry about. And probably none of you will have any problems because of your firewalls, tech know-how, limited amount of sites of interest and knowing what not to click on. But unlike Y2K, it is just going to get increasingly dangerous to use XP online.

I upgraded years ago because I wanted more RAM and needed a 64 bit OS, something that XP wasn't very good for. But now that it's not getting patched I wouldn't think of using it, not for the long term at least.

Again, you XP users will probably be OK, certainly for a while, but personally I would not want to risk it.


* Even I worked on Y2K prevention, patching and upgrading corporate laptops for a while in late 99.
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K4JK
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« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2014, 01:05:52 PM »


My wife uses an older XP machine that is NOT compatible with Windows7 or 8. She uses it to access e-mail and facebook so for now I plan on leaving it running XP rather than spending the money to purchase a new computer. If Norton stops supporting XP then I'll have to reconsider at that point.


You're letting someone inside your trusted network use an unpatched, unsupported operating system for routine access to two extremely large threat vectors... Bad idea.


But unlike Y2K, it is just going to get increasingly dangerous to use XP online.

I agree wholeheartedly. And this fact can't be overstated.

As future exploits for Windows go public, only Windows 7+ will be patched. Criminals will comb through these patches to see which vulnerabilities also might apply to XP. They are going to have an ever-growing number of roadmaps to attack millions of unpatched computers (that will never be patched). In the wild, XP is already attacked 6 times more often than Windows 7. That factor is only going to increase now that XP patches aren't being cataloged and released anymore.

Additionally, literally hundreds (if not more) of exploits for XP will go unknown or fly way under the radar because Win 7 is designed differently enough that a flaw in XP may not apply to 7. Microsoft won't be cataloging those flaws or patching them anymore, because they don't apply to 7. Sure, CERT and MITRE may catalog them when they are publicly discovered by white-hats and maybe workarounds for some of them can be developed but relying on that is a fool's errand.

Anti-virus software can't patch fundamental security flaws in operating systems. If you've talked yourself into thinking running AV software is a viable solution for continuing to run XP you're whistling past the graveyard.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2014, 01:08:12 PM by K4JK » Logged

ex W4HFK
W8JX
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« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2014, 04:29:22 PM »

As future exploits for Windows go public, only Windows 7+ will be patched.

Vista and above still supported. Vista has about 3 years left and 7 has 5 1/2 years left.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2014, 04:42:03 PM »

It looks like Microsoft has a plan to keep everyone purchasing a new computer every few years even though the old one still does everything that we need it to do.  Angry
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K4JK
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« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2014, 04:49:27 PM »

Vista and above still supported. Vista has about 3 years left and 7 has 5 1/2 years left.
True, however my point still stands.
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ex W4HFK
W8JX
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« Reply #24 on: May 20, 2014, 04:55:54 PM »

It looks like Microsoft has a plan to keep everyone purchasing a new computer every few years even though the old one still does everything that we need it to do.  Angry

Maybe if you live in past and do not want keep up with technology. Today's powerful hardware can run complex code effortlessly that was not possible several years ago.
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AE4RV
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« Reply #25 on: May 20, 2014, 04:59:04 PM »

It looks like Microsoft has a plan to keep everyone purchasing a new computer every few years even though the old one still does everything that we need it to do.  Angry

If by "few" you mean three and then add 10 to that number of years, then, yes, I guess that's true. There's always Linux, but I, too, prefer Windows (and OS X). I'm pleasantly surprised how long MS will support on old OS. I remember when you needed a new PC every three years on principle, now five to 10 is not an unreasonable amount of time to own one if your needs aren't bleeding edge...
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K4JK
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« Reply #26 on: May 20, 2014, 05:13:36 PM »

It looks like Microsoft has a plan to keep everyone purchasing a new computer every few years even though the old one still does everything that we need it to do.  Angry

I'm not a fan of Microsoft by any stretch of the imagination but this isn't really a valid argument. XP is almost 13 years old. For comparison go into an Apple store and ask if you can get support for an OS prior to Lion, like Snow Leopard.  Shoot, even Lion is less than 3 years old and it's only partially supported these days.

I'm all for finding ways to use older machines for things and scraping together old, cannibalized hardware to save money but if you are going to do that you shouldn't use XP anymore. Sucks but them's the breaks. The alternative is to learn linux or buy a new computer.

The good news is there are plenty of places you can get a  approx. $300 computer (with windows 8 ) from. If you only care about email and facebook you can get a chromebook for $200.
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ex W4HFK
AE4RV
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« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2014, 05:35:43 PM »

I would stand up and salute a ham using a late 70s or early 80s 8 bit microcomputer in their shack with old radios, re-creating a period ham shack. Wayne Green would be proud, and so would I. But the modern Internet reality is don't go online with a petri dish. XP is going to become a petri dish of Internet disease. To put it another way, I am not anti-old computer, but if it's going to be online, you better patch that. No more patches for ye ole XP...
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AA4PB
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« Reply #28 on: May 20, 2014, 05:48:21 PM »

"Maybe if you live in past and do not want keep up with technology"

Some people need to keep up with technology. Others just have to have the latest, greatest. Others don't see a need to replace a computer that does everything they need to do with it. The cost of a new computer is a minor part of the upgrade. When I replaced my failing XP machine with a new Windows7 machine a couple of years ago I wound up having to purchase a new version of Office and upgrades for several of my other programs that worked perfectly well on the old XP machine. I had to put more money into software upgrades than I paid for the computer.

It wasn't that long ago (maybe a couple of years) that I still had a Win98 laptop that I used primarily for programming microprocessor chips. When it got to the point that I had two cups of coffee waiting for it to boot, I removed Norton Antivirus and disabled the wireless card. Then it ran like new and I continued to use it until it finally failed. Then I replaced it with a new XP machine. Had to purchase a new programmer because the new machine had no parallel port. Of course the new programmer required new software and the new software required a minor change in the hex file format (which of course took several hours to troubleshoot).

Needless to say I'm not excited about replacing the other XP machine and having to upgrade software, print drivers, etc. Worst yet it will probably have to be Win8 (Win7 machines now cost more than Win8 for some reason) and that means a new learning curve for me to get it working and the wife to use it.


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N9DG
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« Reply #29 on: May 20, 2014, 05:50:48 PM »

Anybody remember Y2K?  Wink

Excellent point!  All too many people were all hyped up.....  over nothing!

It wasn't nothing. People worked for years on that*. They fixed Y2K before it was an issue. With XP, the opposite is true - people are no longer fixing it. Also, with Y2K we knew right away that all was well. The date came and went, and our power, money, telephones all still worked. And if a problem did crop up we knew someone would be there to fix it. Not so with XP - they've stopped fixing it.

Sure, for the near term there is not much to worry about. And probably none of you will have any problems because of your firewalls, tech know-how, limited amount of sites of interest and knowing what not to click on. But unlike Y2K, it is just going to get increasingly dangerous to use XP online.

I upgraded years ago because I wanted more RAM and needed a 64 bit OS, something that XP wasn't very good for. But now that it's not getting patched I wouldn't think of using it, not for the long term at least.

Again, you XP users will probably be OK, certainly for a while, but personally I would not want to risk it.


* Even I worked on Y2K prevention, patching and upgrading corporate laptops for a while in late 99.

Agreed, Y2K was an example of the entire computer and software industry doing their jobs. If nothing was done there certainly would have been plenty of problems in a lot of places for sure. Though I really doubt that the total doomsday scenarios being hyped were all that likely either.

The OS/2 and proprietary hardware versions of the products that I had worked on at that time would not work past Y2K at all, I know because I was involved with testing them..

Now standby for the Y2036 and Y2038 problems....
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