Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 18 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Still using XP??  (Read 44731 times)
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 536




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: May 20, 2014, 05:54:13 PM »

It looks like Microsoft has a plan to keep everyone purchasing a new computer every few years even though the old one still does everything that we need it to do.  Angry

Maybe if you live in past and do not want keep up with technology. Today's powerful hardware can run complex code effortlessly that was not possible several years ago.

It isn't about living in the past, it is being practical. Not everyone has money to buy new computers for the household every few years. Just because Microsoft comes out with a new OS doesn't mean we have to use it. And there is no reason to run out and buy a new computer that just because it comes with the latest OS. There is something abhorrent to tossing out perfectly working equipment (computers) just because the software company decides to withdraw support.

Microsoft is the one responsible for this mess. They should have released a new OS in 2004 to replace XP. And then release a new OS in 2008. They didn't. They waited until 2007 only to release Vista which had much higher requirements and could not run properly (if at all) on all existing XP machines. Well people wanted to continue to use XP and not Vista, Microsoft had a problem on it's hands.

Then we had that little issue of 'netbooks', Linux beat Microsoft the netbook market. But Microsoft wasn't going to let Linux have that field. Just one problem, ahem...Vista. It wasn't going to run correctly on netbooks. So...(you guessed it) they allowed XP to be sold on these new netbooks. Thus delaying the retirement of XP even further out.

(Again this goes back on Microsoft for releasing an OS that had too high of operating requirements and could not anticipate the marketplace ie: 'netbooks. And MSFT could not foresee that there would be a demand for an OS with lower operating requirements.)

Still it wasn't a simple matter for the corporate world to upgrade XP machines to Vista. Because of the higher requirements demanded by Vista, driver issues, specialized programs that were written only for XP (because of the unusually long time frame between releases).

So Microsoft delayed releasing a new OS after XP and it could not run properly on existing machines. And it is the consumer's fault for sticking with XP? The machines still ran, they did their job and that is all that mattered to the corporate world and to the consumers.

Our shipping office was running XP on 1.7 Ghz with a 20 GB hard drive and 256 MB ram up to 2009.  I highly doubt Vista would ever boot up with those specs and the company was not going to shell out a couple of hundred on a new machine in order just to run Vista.

 If the computer is used for basic chat, basic printing and watching youtube videos. One doesn't need a high end computer for that. If it ain't broke, why replace it? Why replace an 10 year old refrigerator unless it stops working?  There are people driving cars with 150,000+ miles. People live in 50 and 100 year old homes.

Repurpose that XP computer it in a few months with some Linux variant if you want to continue to use it for sensitive online banking. Or get a Windows 7 computer (they are still out there) to use that for sensitive stuff like online banking and credit card transactions. And keep that XP computer (s) for basic non sensitive internet activities. Or limit it to just run ham related programs offline.
 
.

Logged

Still using Windows XP Pro.
N9DG
Member

Posts: 314




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: May 20, 2014, 05:59:27 PM »

...
My understanding is that most ATM machines are running XP. However, those are running on the inside of a hardware VPN so they aren't exposed to the Internet.
...

My hunch is that the ATM machines run XP Embedded. As such they would likely only be running the bare minimum services to get the job done. Fewer services = smaller attack surface. So in addition to hardware firewalls etc. there are less accessible ways to try and gain access to it vs. the common user's desktop or laptop machine with a whole bunch of stuff running on it all the time.
Logged
K4JK
Member

Posts: 294




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: May 20, 2014, 06:17:28 PM »


My hunch is that the ATM machines run XP Embedded. As such they would likely only be running the bare minimum services to get the job done. Fewer services = smaller attack surface. So in addition to hardware firewalls etc. there are less accessible ways to try and gain access to it vs. the common user's desktop or laptop machine with a whole bunch of stuff running on it all the time.

XP Embedded is also still supported through at least 2016, so there is extra time for companies to move to something else.
Logged

ex W4HFK
KE4DRN
Member

Posts: 3722




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: May 20, 2014, 08:10:59 PM »

hi,

Yes Y2K was a very big deal.  If your small company did not have the resources,
money that is, to get the programs updated or replaced, you would be out of business.
Many companies were sold to their larger competitors and or merger of equals to survive.

Y2K was an OS constraint, XP end of life is totally different.

The Y2K issue forced companies to take a hard look at their IT systems and have
appropriate backup policies in place when many did not exist or were totally inadequate.

73 james
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




Ignore
« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2014, 11:52:08 AM »

It wasn't nothing. People worked for years on that*. They fixed Y2K before it was an issue....

Yes, I agree that it may have posed a problem, but for years the electronics machines had put the 'century transfer' issue in with their plans.  What I mean is that the companies didn't just stop their calendars at Dec. 31, 1999, they continued it into the 2000's.

Quote
With XP, the opposite is true - people are no longer fixing it....

True again, but just like the Y2K issue, the OS still works--sometimes better than the trash Microsoft first came out with to replace it--or have you forgotten the abortion called Vista that replaced it?  

Microsoft is like any other big company.  It wants the revenues to keep coming in, but people, especially in this economy are sick and tired of being dictated to.  They're starting to tell Microsoft what they are and are not going to accept.

The plain truth of the matter is that computers got to the point years ago that their speed wasn't being utilized to the maximum.  Ultra speed computers now are mainly used for gaming.  There simply aren't many other uses for such fast machines--right now.  XP and the computers that it will run on are fast enough for most people and their uses right now, even if Microsoft is dumping XP.  Heck, I even know people who are still running 98 on machines--granted, not on the internet, but they're still running those machines for the applications that ran on 98 and were "thrown out" by the change--but are still useful to them, or fun for them and their kids.

Yes, I run 7 on an Intel Xeon 3.2 GHZ hyper-threaded workstation converted from an older server, but I also have an older Dell Dimension 4100 running 98 for some games and apps that simply will not run on 7 (or XP, for that matter) and the Intel machine that is my main computer.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2014, 11:54:22 AM by K1CJS » Logged
AA4PB
Member

Posts: 12832




Ignore
« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2014, 12:19:35 PM »

CJS: Exactly! As I said, I ran 98, even on the Internet, for a long time after it was replaced by XP. Norton AV got too big for it to handle so I uninstalled Norton and put on one of the simple free AV programs. It worked like a charm on the Internet. And, I never got a virus or got hacked in the 2-3 years that I ran it.

Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2014, 07:32:56 AM »

Still using XP. Still able to access sites with no issues.

The only issue was Firefox forced update to #29 and the UI looks like crap and Forecast Fox is incompatible with FF#29. Looks like FF screwed up big time, perhaps FF is trying to pattern their OS after Windows 8...

Firefox 'forced' an update?  Set your updating to be informed but not to install updates unless you want to--that will take care of automatic updating.  Also, if I'm not mistaken, you can still reinstall FF28 if you find issues with FF29--as you have found.  You just have to do a little exploring to get the older version back.
Logged
N0YXB
Member

Posts: 308




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2014, 12:58:25 PM »


My hunch is that the ATM machines run XP Embedded. As such they would likely only be running the bare minimum services to get the job done. Fewer services = smaller attack surface. So in addition to hardware firewalls etc. there are less accessible ways to try and gain access to it vs. the common user's desktop or laptop machine with a whole bunch of stuff running on it all the time.

XP Embedded is also still supported through at least 2016, so there is extra time for companies to move to something else.

Interesting, thanks.
Logged

Vince
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 536




Ignore
« Reply #38 on: May 26, 2014, 02:01:25 PM »

Still using XP. Still able to access sites with no issues.

The only issue was Firefox forced update to #29 and the UI looks like crap and Forecast Fox is incompatible with FF#29. Looks like FF screwed up big time, perhaps FF is trying to pattern their OS after Windows 8...

Firefox 'forced' an update?  Set your updating to be informed but not to install updates unless you want to--that will take care of automatic updating.  Also, if I'm not mistaken, you can still reinstall FF28 if you find issues with FF29--as you have found.  You just have to do a little exploring to get the older version back.

Thanks for the info, I did fix it.

I first changed the update under (options) from Automatically Install Updates to 'Never Check For Updates'. (You can check "Check For Updates" but then the 'nag screen' keeps popping up.)

I Googled Firefox 28 and found it under
https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/releases/28.0/win32/

If you live in the U.S. you want this version
https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/releases/28.0/win32/en-US/

Click that and look for
Firefox Setup 28.0.exe

Right Click Save as

Download

Finish Downloading

Close the existing FF 29 out

No need to uninstall FF 29

Install FF28

And... FF 28 was installed and also my Forecastfox came back.

I double checked the updates to make sure that it won't update without my permission anymore and I'm all set.

Just be careful. the official site is from mozilla.org . Do not download FF from any other site other than mozilla.org .

There is a classic theme extension if users want FF 29 but don't like the looks, but Forecastfox does NOT work with FF 29 even with the classic theme extension.

Been meaning to post this, but busy with other projects. But thanks again K1CJS for mentioning it.

.

.
Logged

Still using Windows XP Pro.
W8JX
Member

Posts: 5751




Ignore
« Reply #39 on: May 27, 2014, 07:19:14 AM »

I would not waste time downgrading Firefox. Foxcast will be fixed just be patient.
Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
KA6MLE
Member

Posts: 80




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: May 27, 2014, 08:38:37 AM »

Anybody remember Y2K?  Wink


Very clearly! My company wasted over $80 million in software upgrades in fear of the end of the world!   Grin I didn't upgrade a thing
Logged
N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 470




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: May 27, 2014, 10:07:26 AM »

Come on, the Y2K???  Most people, even some technical people, don't have a clue as to what that was about.  Heck, one of the Boston news stations was blathering about power plants going down.  Really???  They light the damn thing with an oily rag on a stick!

OK, there WAS one vehicle, which I will NOT mention, that DID have a problem with Y2K.  But it was really an obscure problem, and was taken care of by the manufacturer.  (And yes, the vehicle did have an integrated cell phone...)

So, what was the real Y2K problem, in terms even you old Aunt Martha can understand... 

Let me tell you a story.

When I moved, I always wanted to keep checks in order.  I was at 5500 or so, and when I went to a new bank, I insisted they start at 5526, to be the next check in sequence.  Sounds reasonable, right?

But by doing this I eventually got up to 9999 on my checks.  What's next?  10000 you say.  Well, not quite.  I ordered my checks from an 'outside' service, not the bank, since the bank charged 4 or 5 times as much.  Since I had ordered checks still in the 99xx range and it 'rolled over' to 10000, the company just gave me checks from 10000 and up as the next in sequence. 

Great!  Well, not so great.  Not many people realize that at that time, and maybe even still now, consumer checks only have 4 digits for the check number.  Commercial accounts could go 5.  So what happens when you use a 5-digit check number on a private checking account?

I was at one of the refurb/surplus stores and bout a new garage door opener, as well as a few other things.  The bill came to under $400.  No big deal, I wrote a check.  It was check number 10000.  They range me up then inserted my check into that little reader they had to scan it and the register died.  Not just that register, ALL the registers.  The store manager came out and was trying to fix things.  They had to reboot all the registers.  In the mean time there was this fairly robust lady in line about 2 behind me with a few missing teeth and more hair on face than I had on mine (and I didn't shave that morning) who kept asking, in a more belligerent tone each time "What's the problem up there?"  Eventually the store manager got things rebooted and staying up, but he just plain accepted my check and wouldn't run it through the check verification machine.

Over the next week or so, every single check I wrote that was verified and run through one of those check verification machines would hang the check machine, but at least they didn't hang the whole register system.  These were checks from 10001 to 10010. 

Once I hit 10011, the problem cleared.  However, the check verification service kept flagging my checks to the retail establishments as 'starter checks'.  That stopped once I hit 10101.  But even then they kept giving warnings.  Finally, I bought a lawn mower at K-Mart with a check numbered somewhere up around 10600 or so.  It set a warning, but the manager was called and he quickly overrode it.  Said the system flagged my check as an 'early' check, something it did for any check under 750, according to the manager. 

Suddenly it dawned on me.  The check service was only reading 4 of the 5 digits!  The total crash at 10000 must have been because the system read 0000.  And the other crashes at 10001 to 10009 must have been 0001 to 0009, and similar issues up to 10101.  Now it suddenly became clear why starter checks always started at 101!

Anyway, the same thing as happened here happened at Y2K.  It was nothing more than a lot of OLD programs that only read 2 digits for the year.  99 for 1999 and 00 for 2000.  The problem was what happens when dates are compared.  How old is a 10 year old when the computer subtracted 1990 from 2000?  It's pretty obvious the answer is 10 years old.  But if the software only used 2 digits.  90 from 00.  Either -10, or...  Some computer programs were smart enough to know about 1900, especially for birth dates.  But they all assumed it was for OLD people, people born in the late 1800's.  So that 10 year old kid suddenly showed up as 90, depending on the algorithm.

The Y2K problem wasn't this big complex problem, it was a bunch of little simple problems that the know-nothings talking heads in the media blew all out of proportion.  No, cars didn't stop, power didn't go off, jail cells didn't fail and all automatically open at midnight.  Heck, one 'newsperson' even speculated that ammo wouldn't work!  I guess he heard there was a run on ammo from the preppers, getting ready for civil disobedience, and drew the only logical conclusion to Y2K his limited brain could handle. 

Yes, it was a problem.  Yes, it was software.  And actually, very similar in nature to the problems the know-nothings all talk about with com ports on PCs....
Logged
W2JUV
Member

Posts: 10




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: May 27, 2014, 10:21:15 AM »

My 10 yr old notebook with XP has insufficient processor speed and RAM to accomodate Windows 7 so I purchased a new laptop with Intel i5 processor, 6GB of RAM and Windows 8.1.  And yes there is a learning curve with 8.1, but we're making progress.
Logged
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6034




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: May 27, 2014, 11:52:23 AM »

Come on, the Y2K???  Most people, even some technical people, don't have a clue as to what that was about.  Heck, one of the Boston news stations was blathering about power plants going down.  Really???  They light the damn thing with an oily rag on a stick!....

...The Y2K problem wasn't this big complex problem, it was a bunch of little simple problems that the know-nothings talking heads in the media blew all out of proportion.  No, cars didn't stop, power didn't go off, jail cells didn't fail and all automatically open at midnight.  Heck, one 'newsperson' even speculated that ammo wouldn't work!  I guess he heard there was a run on ammo from the preppers, getting ready for civil disobedience, and drew the only logical conclusion to Y2K his limited brain could handle. 

Yes, it was a problem.  Yes, it was software.  And actually, very similar in nature to the problems the know-nothings all talk about with com ports on PCs....

The 'problem' wasn't the problem it was expected to be.  As you said, it was a bunch of little incidents.

The same thing that XP will probably have--small isolated incidents.  Yes, support is gone for XP, but all that says is that there isn't much left to fix.  Since Microsoft ended that so called support, how much do you want to bet that the attacks which were probably many to begin with will dwindle to one or two really serious threats--if that!

The message is the same, however.  The gloom and doomers that insist that "The sky is falling" don't really know what will happen--if anything.  'Remember Y2K' is just a calling to that message--be prudent, be careful, but don't believe everything that you hear!
Logged
W8AAZ
Member

Posts: 341




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: May 27, 2014, 05:57:39 PM »

  This month went with a cheap refurb  machine with W7 pro.  The XP was fine with me except for internet.  Freezing up etc. with the last version of IE that works with XP. Insufferable malfunctions. Tried Firefox and Opera.  Firefox slowed down eventually to be as bad as IE.  Opera worked great for a few weeks and then said there was an error and please reload, but it would not download anymore onto that machine.  SO now my net issues are cleared up finally if not other issues of compatibility, etc. The search engines/home pages were the issue rather than the websites themselves, in most cases.  Sometimes eventually you just have to throw in the towel.     
Logged
Pages: Prev 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 18 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!