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Author Topic: Latest and Greatest.  (Read 22249 times)
K1CJS
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Posts: 6061




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« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2014, 08:41:45 AM »

The start screen is the only "Metro" looking thing I ever see. Everything else looks like regular Windows that we're used to.

The restored start button in 8.1 does not bring back the old start menu structure. It still takes you to the new start screen.

Why do you insist on putting words in my mouth--or trying to interpret my thoughts?  

First, Windows is Windows.  Win 8 is a new, different version--that is all.  Of course once you get into the application everything looks like the Windows we're used to.  It wouldn't be Windows if it didn't.  It's the user interface that's been changed--and THAT is the bone in many people's throats.

And I never said that the start button brings back the old menu structure--I only said that people wanted the start button back, and Win 8.1 did that.  A thousand pardons if you didn't understand--maybe I didn't express my thoughts plainly enough.

In any event, this picking of nits isn't doing anyone a service, and I'll not continue it.  73.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2014, 08:44:05 AM by K1CJS » Logged
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 621




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« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2014, 09:02:24 AM »


Microsoft could have avoided this whole mess (and this thread) by allowing the user to choose between the Classic user interface and Metro anytime they want. Just log out and switch to another interface!

Good Lord with Microsoft's money and talent pool one would think they would have figured there might be some issues with public and corporate acceptance before unleashing this cluster fuss to the public and allowing the user to choose at will would be the best option for all.

With Linux one can choose between different types of user Interfaces, so why can't Microsoft get it done?

.
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Still using Windows XP Pro.
W9CLL
Member

Posts: 56




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« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2014, 09:45:15 AM »


Microsoft could have avoided this whole mess (and this thread) by allowing the user to choose between the Classic user interface and Metro anytime they want. Just log out and switch to another interface!

Good Lord with Microsoft's money and talent pool one would think they would have figured there might be some issues with public and corporate acceptance before unleashing this cluster fuss to the public and allowing the user to choose at will would be the best option for all.

With Linux one can choose between different types of user Interfaces, so why can't Microsoft get it done?

.
Because M$ does not want you to choose.
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KA5PIU
Member

Posts: 446




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« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2014, 11:10:01 AM »

Hello.

Someone pointed out that Linux does not do as much as Windows X.
Well, Open Office is available with Linux.
You can upgrade your old version of MS Works to the newer OS, and an entire library of software needs to be upgraded or replaced.
This may seen trivial, but for a large corporate account like USAA, that is $15 thousand per "seat".
Yes, the software costs several times that of the hardware.
Vista was rejected almost right from the start.
Space Cadet, the pinball game, will not run in Vista, and it is a Microsoft program!
But, oddly enough, it was possible to make the needed programs work in unix, USAA did not go open source.
So, you see, the picture gets more convoluted.
Microsoft is just about to get hit with a legal issue.
If Microsoft is no longer willing to support XP, do they give up the rights to it?
If that is not the case, what if some group writes an open source version of XP?
Think about it. all the XP, without the price.
XP Free, it even sounds nice!
But, at that point Microsoft is all but out of business.
Microsoft sued the makers of "Open Windows" and lost on copyright.
Xerox owns the rights to the Windows name.
So, if Microsoft loses this next go-round, true, it might not be called Windows XP, but Open Windows?
If it can run 100% of all of your legacy software, and were free?
This may become a non issue, as Android, not perfect but getting there, and iOS, are taking over.
Thank you.
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K5UNX
Member

Posts: 328


WWW

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« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2014, 12:04:04 PM »

The start screen is the only "Metro" looking thing I ever see. Everything else looks like regular Windows that we're used to.

The restored start button in 8.1 does not bring back the old start menu structure. It still takes you to the new start screen.

Why do you insist on putting words in my mouth--or trying to interpret my thoughts?  

First, Windows is Windows.  Win 8 is a new, different version--that is all.  Of course once you get into the application everything looks like the Windows we're used to.  It wouldn't be Windows if it didn't.  It's the user interface that's been changed--and THAT is the bone in many people's throats.

And I never said that the start button brings back the old menu structure--I only said that people wanted the start button back, and Win 8.1 did that.  A thousand pardons if you didn't understand--maybe I didn't express my thoughts plainly enough.

In any event, this picking of nits isn't doing anyone a service, and I'll not continue it.  73.

All I am saying is that there is a choice. People can use Windows 8 and not be forced into the metro interface. The desktop is there and it looks a lot like Windows 7 with the exception of the start menu. I am sorry if you think I am putting words in your mouth.

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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 621




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« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2014, 02:44:59 PM »


Microsoft is just about to get hit with a legal issue.
If Microsoft is no longer willing to support XP, do they give up the rights to it?
If that is not the case, what if some group writes an open source version of XP?
Think about it. all the XP, without the price.
XP Free, it even sounds nice!
So, if Microsoft loses this next go-round, true, it might not be called Windows XP, but Open Windows?
If it can run 100% of all of your legacy software, and were free?


Usually when talking about software that the company no longer supports, it can be called "Abandonware"  . Microsoft orphaned XP, so Abandonware might a good word to use. Yet the company still retains full copyright on it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abandonware

"Commercial software unsupported but still owned by a viable company"

And I would venture to guess if a group of talented programmers took XP and resold it with support you can bet Microsoft would sue the stuffing out of them.

Why can't someone deconstruct Windows and then make an OS in which Windows programs can run on? That would be illegal.

There is something called "ReactOS" which is supposed to run Windows programs and was developed from the ground up without using any of Microsoft's code.  I remember first hearing about this several years ago and tried it and could not it use it in any practical sense. Maybe things have changed since?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/React_os


Now, how many here are aware of Microsoft's most obscure OS? "Windows FLP" It was not available to the public but through their Customer Assurance program. It ran like XP looked like XP yet consumed far less resources than regular XP

Windows Fundamentals for Legacy PCs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Fundamentals_for_Legacy_PCs


System requirements CPU    Pentium 233 MHz (300 MHz recommended)
Memory    64 MB (128 MB recommended)
Graphics hardware    800×600 computer monitor
Hard disk space    610 MB (1 GB recommended)
Network hardware    Optional

Here is more information on Windows FLP

http://windowsitpro.com/windows-xp/what-you-need-know-about-windows-fundamentals-legacy-pcs

And now.... you know, the rest of the story. And now back to our beloved Soap Opera " As The Hard Drive Spins"


Logged

Still using Windows XP Pro.
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




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« Reply #36 on: June 08, 2014, 03:52:33 PM »

The laptop will go the way of the netbook and dodo bird. OK let me refine this a bit, the older generation like myself will still want/use a full laptop but the younger gen is moving quickly away from them to all in one devices. I have been in IT for 25 years and have seen this trend happening more and more.

There has always been a market for appliance computers (ie a tablet / smartphone) but until recently they have been terrible, forcing less techy people to buy a PC in order to accomplish the few tasks they wish to do.  Think of how many computers will be used merely for email, web browsing, and word processing - maybe 90%!  But there will always be a market for higher powered computers more suitable for tasks like programming, video editing, photo editing, and so forth.

In fact, I think there will be an opposite trend to the one you predict.  People will realize that paying $50-120 a month merely to squint at tiny web pages and movies on their phone and send text messages is stupid, and cell phones will actually become less popular.  This has already occurred with Bluetooth headsets - 5 years ago they were quite popular but now you simply do not see people using them much.  Most Bluetooth headsets I have seen in the last couple years are worn by the baby boomers still enchanted with this Dick Tracy style technology.

My wife and I have a pay as you go dumb-phone that stays in the glove box in case of a breakdown.  Neither of us carries a cell phone, and we are not that old.  I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.
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K5UNX
Member

Posts: 328


WWW

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« Reply #37 on: June 08, 2014, 05:12:47 PM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.

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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 621




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« Reply #38 on: June 08, 2014, 05:32:48 PM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.



iPhone and iPad have Facetime
http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4319

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Still using Windows XP Pro.
W8JX
Member

Posts: 6664




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« Reply #39 on: June 08, 2014, 06:42:08 PM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.



iPhone and iPad have Facetime
http://support.apple.com/kb/ht4319



Skype is free and better quality than face time and cross platform too. It works on Driod, Windows and IOS.
Logged

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You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




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« Reply #40 on: June 08, 2014, 10:04:24 PM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.

They use a combination of Skype and Apple's Facetime if the other party has an Apple device.  Most of the people I know are Apple users for various reasons, so it works well for that.
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6664




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« Reply #41 on: June 09, 2014, 04:46:26 AM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.

They use a combination of Skype and Apple's Facetime if the other party has an Apple device.  Most of the people I know are Apple users for various reasons, so it works well for that.

Face time used a very low res camera to limit bandwidth and graphic requirements and still does compared to industry, Skype is far more advanced and MS bought Skype for that reason a few years ago but unlike Apple it will keep using it cross platform.
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--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 472




Ignore
« Reply #42 on: June 09, 2014, 01:54:08 PM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.

They use a combination of Skype and Apple's Facetime if the other party has an Apple device.  Most of the people I know are Apple users for various reasons, so it works well for that.

Face time used a very low res camera to limit bandwidth and graphic requirements and still does compared to industry, Skype is far more advanced and MS bought Skype for that reason a few years ago but unlike Apple it will keep using it cross platform.

Skype suffers in a number of ways, most importantly it is not secure.  MS bought Skype and backdoored it immediately.  Pretty typical of their dirty tricks.
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6664




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« Reply #43 on: June 10, 2014, 07:51:59 AM »

I have a few friends who have switched to using an iPod Touch instead of an iPhone because wifi is easily available in many places for free, and it is just as good as a cell phone when it is near a wifi access point.

I am curious, using Skype? What for voice service? I know Skype could be used, but I thought you had to pay for a phone number with Skype but I am not sure.

They use a combination of Skype and Apple's Facetime if the other party has an Apple device.  Most of the people I know are Apple users for various reasons, so it works well for that.

Face time used a very low res camera to limit bandwidth and graphic requirements and still does compared to industry, Skype is far more advanced and MS bought Skype for that reason a few years ago but unlike Apple it will keep using it cross platform.

Skype suffers in a number of ways, most importantly it is not secure.  MS bought Skype and backdoored it immediately.  Pretty typical of their dirty tricks.

Blame government and FCC / CALEA requirement for law enforce since Skype was now US owned. This started under Bush junior.   
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--------------------------------------
You can embrace new computer/tablet technology and change with it or cling to old fall far behind....
KA5PIU
Member

Posts: 446




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: June 10, 2014, 10:13:48 AM »

Hello.

Microsoft has a back door, and I try and stay away.
VoIP works well, can be secure, and run on most platforms.
Skype was secure, US law requires some things be done.
But, what if you loaded non US compliant VoIP?
The US law limited exports of some types of encryption.
Anyone remember "Clipper", that wonderful US encryption scheme?
Omni was the UK version.
PGP is the free world version.
The Russians have GLONASS, and it can be used to encrypt signals, just like the US system, but the Russians will let anyone do it.
The effort to keep up with it makes it secure, as the ever moving key needs to be captured in real time.
True, everyone is using the same rolling code, but has their own key, and a public key.
Hackers are beginning to exploit this, on tablets, phones, etc.
So, the feds say that there can be no GLONASS only mode on US devices.
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