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Author Topic: The truth about handles  (Read 6975 times)
SWMAN
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Posts: 586




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« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2014, 06:16:20 AM »

A handle is very similar to a knob !
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KA5PIU
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« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2014, 06:54:50 PM »

Hello.

Cowboys owned a "Handle", saddle.
When they went from job to job, they would carry the saddle in one hand, to leave the other hand free.
They would have their name in that area tooled in, and cowboys would want nicknames, cowboy names.
Since cowboy did not require any education or formal training, people running from the law frequently would work there.
Railroads, a railroader would carry his "Grip", his suitcase.
So, the saying "Get a grip" would mean get a job.
CBers somehow attached themselves to the cowboy thing as cowboys were frequently outlaws.
And, speaking of cowboys, how about the ones in thialand?
http://www.bangkokpost.com/photos_content/large/1/1160/16160-1298696844umv1jctpy0.jpg
Yes, you have to be really careful with them spotted cows!
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AA4PB
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« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2014, 12:25:41 PM »

I found the article that I originally referenced. It appeared in the March 1959 issue of "Radio & TV News". It was a detailed construction article by Don Stoner, W6TNS, on how to build your own CB radio transceiver. While I'm sure it was not the FCC's intent to have a "no test ham band", the article detailed the long distances that could be worked with only 5W on 11M and asked who would be the first to issue a Worked All States award on CB. The guys that I knew in the Detroit area jumped in with both feet building transceivers from the article and using it just like a ham band, calling CQ DX and working stations all around the U.S.

The transceiver by the way, was a tube type crystal controlled transmitter and a tunable super-regenerative receiver.
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G3RZP
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« Reply #18 on: June 22, 2014, 02:09:40 PM »

I can remember before CB started and 'handle' was common amateur 'slang' for the christian name...
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WA7PRC
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« Reply #19 on: June 22, 2014, 03:11:53 PM »

When was it that , handle (name) became "personel". Whats your personel? The personel here is ......

The term is "personal" or "first personal". Personel [sic] is a group of people.

It's interesting to note that "name" is one syllable while "handle" is two, and "personal" is three. While using the latter two terms may be hip, they're also not as efficient.  And I can't recall them EVER being used on Morse... sending "name" is faster.

vy 73 es gl,
Bryan WA7PRC
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2014, 05:14:49 PM »

I found the article that I originally referenced. It appeared in the March 1959 issue of "Radio & TV News". It was a detailed construction article by Don Stoner, W6TNS, on how to build your own CB radio transceiver. While I'm sure it was not the FCC's intent to have a "no test ham band", the article detailed the long distances that could be worked with only 5W on 11M and asked who would be the first to issue a Worked All States award on CB. The guys that I knew in the Detroit area jumped in with both feet building transceivers from the article and using it just like a ham band, calling CQ DX and working stations all around the U.S.

The transceiver by the way, was a tube type crystal controlled transmitter and a tunable super-regenerative receiver.


I personally think that the FCC goofed big time putting CB on 11 meters, since during a solar maximum it propagates for quite a ways. The Germans thought that they could use 10m for point to point comms over short distances, only to find out that they went to war during a solar maximum and the enemy (US and UK) could sit far from the front lines and monitor everything. Oops. My understanding is that VHF/UHF freqs weren't practical to use in the tube era since the circuitry required was too complicated for tube transceivers. FM requires much more complicated electronics than AM or even SSB. I've been told that truckers will turn the squelch on their CB's up to near 100% so they only hear signals over a few miles. If the squelch is set too low they can hear other truckers over much longer distances.
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AA4PB
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« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2014, 05:45:08 PM »

Tubes were commonly used in commercial VHF mobile and fixed transceivers in the mid 1950's however they weren't cheap. The FCC was looking at 11M because transceivers could be built fairly inexpensively. Their big mistake was that they authorized 11M CB during the time of one of the biggest sunspot cycles ever. People were hearing stations thousands of miles away and told by the FCC that they were not authorized to talk to them. When they heard some CBer working long distances the FCC issued a citation. The result was that the CBers just quit using the FCC issued call sign so that the FCC didn't know who they were. Hindsight is always 20/20  Grin

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G3RZP
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« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2014, 02:03:56 AM »

When WW2 started, the sunspot cycle was at a minimum. The peak was in 1947 or so.

Strangely, considering the amount of telegraphy in early ham radio days, the telegraphers' 'sine' never caught on, 'name' being used instead, despite having 4 times as many dashes!
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N0SYA
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« Reply #23 on: June 23, 2014, 05:49:47 AM »



These handles are awesome, they protect the face of the rig and make carrying easier!
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If you have a clumsy child, you make them wear a helmet. If you have death prone children, you keep a few clones of them in your lab.
KA5PIU
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Posts: 446




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« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2014, 06:07:17 AM »

Hello.

I have heard CB over thousands of miles.
The Latin America types love it for this reason.
Mountain top fixed beams pointed to the US give a 20 decibel gain, from Cuba, and Cuba is but 90 miles away.
Groundwave works just fine.
The Bahamas was the intended direction but the US works fine.
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KA5IPF
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« Reply #25 on: June 23, 2014, 07:30:43 AM »

Hello.

Mountain top fixed beams pointed to the US give a 20 decibel gain, from Cuba, and Cuba is but 90 miles away.



I would like to see the design criteria of a beam with 20dB gain for HF frequencies.
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K4KYV
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Posts: 41




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« Reply #26 on: June 23, 2014, 07:16:06 PM »

"Handle" was used as slang for "name" in ham radio before 11 CB was ever thought about. It was widely in use when I started out in 1959-60. I can recall reading letters from readers in some old QSTs or CQs arguing the point, back in the early 50s or even late 40s. One point of view was that "handle" was an example of phony operating, and that in order not to be a lid, the word "name" should be used. But hams never used "handles" as a  substitute for the station call sign.

OTOH, "personal" has CB written all over it.
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