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Author Topic: Still using Windows 98? NT4.0? 2000?  (Read 13840 times)
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 810




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« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2014, 05:48:56 AM »

well,
- there is the win_3x laptop that runs some logging program,
that one likes, and the CW trainer that one likes, as well.
- then there is the win_98 PC that also has some program(s) on it, that one also likes.
& this thing also dual_boots with win_3x as well.

neither have a wireless card, - so they can't get on the 'net anyway. ..
& none of that stuff will work under a win_7 O/S either.



"Wireless card" exists with Windows 3.x driver(s). Cisco Aironet 350 is one of them. (used to be just Aironet before Cisco bought them). Look it up.

And don't know what you mean by "none of that stuff", but the OP was talking about W98, NT4 and W2K, he didn't mention Win 7 so it is irrelevant to the thread created by the OP.

And not only that, you don't need to have "wireless card" in order to get "on the net". It is the same thing if you have a telegraph key, you don't have to have a radio transmitter in order to send a signal. Have you heard of ethernet networking?

My Acer 330 T Travelmate laptop which runs Windows 98 uses a plugin ethernet LAN card to get on the internet. Yes I tried it out and it works. I was able to view some sites using IE 4 with a mighty 64 MB ram.

It is a small 12" laptop, in fact it is a forerunner of today's netbooks!  It does not contain a floppy or disc drive, but it uses an external combination floppy/disc drive.

It looks like this



.
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Still using Windows XP Pro.
W8JX
Member

Posts: 7771




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« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2014, 07:25:27 AM »

I used OS2 from 93 till about 97 as it could run Win9x apps in a virtual window. OS2  ver 2.x and above was 32 bit. It also had a virtual DOS that was better than real DOS. After that I moved to NT4. Never really cared for or used Win9x much. Switched to Win 2000 as primary in 2000. Used Beta NT5 some before 2000 shipped as it became 2000. Went to XP in 03 and Vista 64 in 07. I found 2000 more stable and quicker than XP back then. Still use Vista on 3 machines and 7 professional on a laptop that I plan to upgrade to 8.1 when I get time too. (It came with both versions non CD). Of early 32 bit Windoze 2000 was best in my book. My old Intel quad core powered Vista 64 bit machine still does a fine job and rock solid. Use 7 but never loved it.
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You can embrace new technology and change with it or cling tightly to old technology and fall further behind everyday....
KK4GGL
Member

Posts: 571




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« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2014, 10:42:38 AM »

Sorry I can't be more certain in my description, but I just dumped the Linux installation from my primary PC in order to play with Win 8.1, so I can't reference it too easily.  What I'm referring to are the add in shells such as WINE, and the additional software that is available on the web, whatever terms that Linux uses for them.  

No, I'm not Linux 'educated,' but I try different things (I have to do something with my retirement hobby time after all) and getting up to speed on the Ubuntu/Mint linux is my next, just as soon as I can set up a spare computer with that OS installed.  That is so I can have a machine that I can still access the web on while I'm playing with the Linux machine.

Since you mention Ubuntu/Mint can we assume you just dumped Ubuntu or Mint?

And I don't understand why you say "setting up" a Linux based app would be any more difficult than a Windows based app.
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73,
Rick KK4GGL
K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6175




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« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2014, 06:55:58 AM »

I erased it from my primary machine hard drive--and it was Linux Mint/Cinnamon 17.  It's going on a separate machine in about a week, as I said, so I can reference the web as I play with the Linux machine.
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KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 517




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« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2014, 03:43:19 PM »

Really can't be on the 'net.  The browser that these systems support are old and can't run on the net, and the newer browsers won't run on the older OSes, they're too old.

BUT...  Computers will still run the old OSes.  I run an older system on 98 for older applications with no problems.

As long as you turn Javascript off older browsers work fine.  Most web sites don't truly need it anyway, and those that do have competition.
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W8ADQ
Member

Posts: 24




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« Reply #20 on: April 24, 2015, 10:36:37 AM »

Windows 95 - I still have my "Gold" official release CDs.  Finding drivers might be "interesting" today.  Add Netscape Navigator and dialup and you are all set... Wink  At least if you have a time machine.

8 Megs of RAM...Wow!  And it sort of slowly booted with 4 Megs - I tested it on an early color notebook that I had back then.  I think it was a Sharp PC6881 with a 25 MHz 386SL, 4 Megs and an IIT math coprocessor.  Loaded from a bag of floppies...

Lookee, a [Start] button.  Wow!

Updates? Security?  Bah!   Roll Eyes

(Tongue FIRMLY planted in cheek.)

For those who can afford to stay as current as possible, I agree with the fellow ham who urges likewise.  Right now I can't, so I keep ancient software offline whenever possible.  I use Knoppix a lot, but only because back in the day I worked with Unix, Xenix and now Linux so it isn't totally foreign.  I like both Windows and Macs and iOS and Android.  Adding a Mac would be fun, and maybe I'll find an old one surplus or something. The Raspberry Pi opens up some interesting possibilities, especially the new quad core at 1 GHz with a Gig of RAM.  For very little money.  I managed to get one of the earlier 700 MHz single core with 512 Megs of RAM.  It runs an ARM port of Debian with a bunch of included software called Raspbian.  There are other options.

All in all, it's a good time to be a ham even if like me, you have to be, uh, frugle.  The challenges are, I  think, part of the fun.  My neighbor gave me his spare old PIC programmer.  That opens new possibilities.  I am a new "convert" from MCS51/52 style microcontrollers.

I just use what I've got and work to make it do its dance.  As one poster encouaged me to "keep on keeping on" so I pass on words of encouragement to everyone here.

Keep the ideas, debates, and sharing of knowledge going.

73,
Jack W8ADQ
(One of those awful no code extras who didn't have spare time until recently.  So, I'm working on learning code.  I was an electronics and computer professional for about 40 years and designed and built my own SWL receivers since primary school.  I built a BFO way back so I could listen to all of you on SSB.  Thanks for making me feel welcome.  I've started studying for a commercial license just as a challenge to myself. I used studying for my ham ticket as a way to help my memory after strokes and TIAs.  I know that today's tests aren't what they used to be, but I used the study materials to help find things that I had forgotten, so I did my best to make the studying to be as much like it used to be.  I didn't just want a license, I want to LEARN.)

So, do I study for my LID endorsement now?   Tongue
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 7771




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« Reply #21 on: April 24, 2015, 01:36:38 PM »

As long as you turn Javascript off older browsers work fine.  Most web sites don't truly need it anyway, and those that do have competition.

Your dreaming.  Web page standards have changed a lot since then and now HTML5 is gaining steam and those browsers data to HTML 2 or maybe three if your lucky. I chuckle listening to those that stepping backwards is fine.
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You can embrace new technology and change with it or cling tightly to old technology and fall further behind everyday....
K5PHW
Member

Posts: 84




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« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2015, 03:00:20 PM »

 Must you kill everyone's joy?  Roll Eyes
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 810




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« Reply #23 on: April 24, 2015, 03:05:19 PM »

While you really don't use these old machines for the internet. There are people that collect vintage Windows games that play on Win 3.1, 95 and 98. And there are older ham radio programs like logging and packet which play fine on vintage machines.
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Still using Windows XP Pro.
KM1H
Member

Posts: 426




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« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2015, 04:09:35 PM »

Im running my vintage HP GPIB network on a 286.

Motorola 2 way radio programing software wont work beyond a 486 laptop.

I still have several oldies on a shelf for specific uses and they dont have the short PS and MB life of so much of the latest crap.

Still have WIN 3.1 on floppies as well as WIN 95 and 98SE.....just in case.

Carl
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KC9QVL
Member

Posts: 20




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« Reply #25 on: April 24, 2015, 04:38:51 PM »

Sudo apt-get install xxxxx. Not real hard
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KE7TMA
Member

Posts: 517




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« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2015, 12:34:20 PM »

As long as you turn Javascript off older browsers work fine.  Most web sites don't truly need it anyway, and those that do have competition.

Your dreaming.  Web page standards have changed a lot since then and now HTML5 is gaining steam and those browsers data to HTML 2 or maybe three if your lucky. I chuckle listening to those that stepping backwards is fine.

It's not "stepping backwards" to maintain a system that works.  I laugh at your brainless consumerism.  Your attitude is why we are collectively so deep in debt.
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 7771




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« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2015, 02:40:38 PM »

It's not "stepping backwards" to maintain a system that works.  I laugh at your brainless consumerism.  Your attitude is why we are collectively so deep in debt.

To maintain a system and browser long unsupported is stepping backwards. The brainless part is you always looking to reasons to cling to past to justify your fear of change.
Logged

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You can embrace new technology and change with it or cling tightly to old technology and fall further behind everyday....
KK4GGL
Member

Posts: 571




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2015, 03:06:44 PM »

It's not "stepping backwards" to maintain a system that works.  I laugh at your brainless consumerism.  Your attitude is why we are collectively so deep in debt.

To maintain a system and browser long unsupported is stepping backwards. The brainless part is you always looking to reasons to cling to past to justify your fear of change.

Maintaining a working system is not stepping backward.
Logged

73,
Rick KK4GGL
W8JX
Member

Posts: 7771




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« Reply #29 on: April 27, 2015, 03:18:12 PM »

It's not "stepping backwards" to maintain a system that works.  I laugh at your brainless consumerism.  Your attitude is why we are collectively so deep in debt.

To maintain a system and browser long unsupported is stepping backwards. The brainless part is you always looking to reasons to cling to past to justify your fear of change.

Maintaining a working system is not stepping backward.

And no backwards OS comment is complete without troll comments trying to sugar coat it.
Logged

--------------------------------------
You can embrace new technology and change with it or cling tightly to old technology and fall further behind everyday....
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