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Author Topic: Nice ham radio scene in the new planet of the apes movie.  (Read 12887 times)
KD8MJR
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« on: July 14, 2014, 09:28:53 PM »

In one scene about 3/4 way through the movie the humans are trying to make contact with anyone that can help them. In that scene they show the radio room and I think I saw at least 4 fairly big radios, two of them looked like 1990 vintage Kenwoods. I was so into the movie that by time I started to look closely the scene changed.  Did anybody catch what models they where using?
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2014, 11:53:25 PM »

In the movie The Postman, which is also set in a post-apocalyptic America (no apes though), the residents of the town somehow get a ham radio to work, and they try to contact any other survivors. It's very cool to see ham radio pop up in popular culture. Also, in the movie The Killing Fields, about a Cambodian who escaped from the Khmer Rouge, there's a scene where he and several other fugitives use a big European tube radio to listen for news from the outside.
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K8AXW
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« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2014, 07:37:23 AM »

In the latest episode of the program (for the lack of a better word) "The Last Ship," the Captain of the ship is listening to a comm radio for any radio signals....with the comment to the effect he "recalls his grandfather having a ham radio at his cabin."

I think that somewhere in the dark recesses of the minds of most people, there is the impression that when all fails, there is always the ham radio operator to fall back on.
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DL8OV
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« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2014, 07:40:25 AM »

Another Planet of the Apes movie?

I must be getting old, I still prefer the original with Charlton Heston.

Peter DL8OV
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2014, 11:03:26 AM »

Another Planet of the Apes movie?

I must be getting old, I still prefer the original with Charlton Heston.

Peter DL8OV

Lol Peter you must be Grin this is the second movie in the rebooted series. 
Like you I loved the original but this is done on a whole new level and looks at it from a different time line.  The first movie deals with how the Apes became intelligent and how about 95% of mankind got wiped out in the process.  The second one deals with the surviving humans trying to get along with the apes.

Watch this clip from the second movie and you will get an idea of the production quality.
http://www.dawnofapes.com/
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2014, 11:14:28 AM »

In the latest episode of the program (for the lack of a better word) "The Last Ship," the Captain of the ship is listening to a comm radio for any radio signals....with the comment to the effect he "recalls his grandfather having a ham radio at his cabin."

I think that somewhere in the dark recesses of the minds of most people, there is the impression that when all fails, there is always the ham radio operator to fall back on.

It would seem logical that if all else fails ham radio would be the only means of communicating long distances.  Contrary to popular belief most of our communications are going through fiber optic cables not satellites.  These cables are very vulnerable to any kind of global disaster.

BTW I am also watching the last ship, it's not bad but the radio gear in that is not consumer stuff and some of it looked like digipan on a PC.

In the planet of the apes movie it was a lot of regular ham gear.  Unfortunately the scene came up in the middle of a battle and I was so locked into the movie that I did not realize what was in front of me until the last 5 seconds of the scene. There might even have been an Amplifier or two in the scene, but i am not sure.
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KJ6ZOL
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« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2014, 01:02:41 PM »

In the latest episode of the program (for the lack of a better word) "The Last Ship," the Captain of the ship is listening to a comm radio for any radio signals....with the comment to the effect he "recalls his grandfather having a ham radio at his cabin."

I think that somewhere in the dark recesses of the minds of most people, there is the impression that when all fails, there is always the ham radio operator to fall back on.

It would seem logical that if all else fails ham radio would be the only means of communicating long distances.  Contrary to popular belief most of our communications are going through fiber optic cables not satellites.  These cables are very vulnerable to any kind of global disaster.

Anybody remember an incident a couple of years ago when AT&T workers locked in a contract dispute simply opened about three manholes in the SF Bay Area and cut the fiber optic cables housed therein? Suddenly, the entire Silicon Valley, the hub of world technology, went DOWN. No landline phones, no cell phones, no point of sale machines, no ATMs, no internet, and so on. Stores were taking cash only. Tech companies sent their workers home since they couldn't work without the internet. Most people had no cash and few supplies. I'm surprised that people took it as well as they did. Maybe East Indians of the upper castes (most East Indians in SV are upper caste) don't riot. It took several DAYS for replacement workers to splice back together the lines. IMO it would take only a handful of terrorists to cut the fiber optic "backbone" cables that carry most data traffic in the US. If they did that, the entire nation, and perhaps parts of Canada, would be offline. It might take a month to redo the cables, if civil society lasted that long.
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2014, 01:29:13 PM »

ZOL that was interesting, I never heard that story before.

IMO a serious set of earthquakes and the fiber optic lines may be toast for months or years.
When Hurricane Ivan hit, I think Cayman island and a few other islands had no internet for about 2 months and that was due to a single break in the cable.  If you have a big earthquake you may have dozens of breaks scattered all across the place it could take a long time to find and get to them.
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2014, 02:20:21 PM »

In another forum a guy identified one of the radios as a Kenwood TS-520 and one of the others he thinks was a Yaesu.
It all happens so fast and they had a lot of gear in that scene, at least 4 rigs and about 7 or 8 other pieces of equipment.
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AF5CC
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« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2014, 09:11:58 PM »

Do the Apes ever get smart enough to operate the radios?  I would bet Koko the Gorilla could probably pass the Technician test if all of the questions were signed to her.

John AF5CC
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2014, 03:56:10 PM »

Do the Apes ever get smart enough to operate the radios?  I would bet Koko the Gorilla could probably pass the Technician test if all of the questions were signed to her.

John AF5CC

No!  But there was one scene when the Apes needed to communicate covertly, so they thumped out messages in CW on the tree trunks.  The stupid humans had no idea it was CW and walked right into a trap.

Rob
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KU4UV
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« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2014, 03:54:49 AM »

In one scene about 3/4 way through the movie the humans are trying to make contact with anyone that can help them. In that scene they show the radio room and I think I saw at least 4 fairly big radios, two of them looked like 1990 vintage Kenwoods. I was so into the movie that by time I started to look closely the scene changed.  Did anybody catch what models they where using?

Yeah, I caught that as well.  Saw the movie last Friday at the drive-in, if you can believe that drive-in's are still around.  There were some old Kenwoods in the scene, like maybe a TS-520 if I am correct.

73,
KU4UV
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G7MRV
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« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2014, 04:05:32 PM »

  If you have a big earthquake you may have dozens of breaks scattered all across the place it could take a long time to find and get to them.


Finding the break in the fibre is not a problem - it takes a few seconds to ping the fibre and detect the exact distance to the break. Finding the fibre itself, somewhere on the sea bed maybe a km or more down, and on a line of possible positions maybe a few hundred metres long, is a nightmare!

A break in a core fibre between Liverpool and the Isle of Man a few years ago took about a month to find, grapple for, lift, splice, seal and recommission, and were talking a few dozen miles of seabed!
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KD8MJR
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« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2014, 06:03:39 PM »

I agree, i was referring to fiber running in the sea.  Although it's not as simple as you may think to find and fix multiple breaks on land.  Its easy to imagine that after a major quake that many of the underground pipe systems will colapse and even major tunnels like the ones that run in NY may be inaccessible for months.
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K0JEG
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« Reply #14 on: July 20, 2014, 10:40:25 AM »

I agree, i was referring to fiber running in the sea.  Although it's not as simple as you may think to find and fix multiple breaks on land.  Its easy to imagine that after a major quake that many of the underground pipe systems will colapse and even major tunnels like the ones that run in NY may be inaccessible for months.

Actually fiber cuts are fairly easy to fix, usually taking a few hours/break depending on what the best fix is. Add to that ring architecture and having good maps and employees familiar with the area, and even a big event can be at least partially restored in a matter of hours. The larger issue is keeping hubs and equipment powered up for extended periods, especially in cases of floods that take out backup generators. The telecom provider might not get to your house right away, but high priority sites like cell towers, 911 centers, etc will be... well... prioritized as part of any emergency response plan.

With "practice" drills provided by backhoes and dump trucks we have a lot of experience with fiber cuts. Smiley
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