Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net

donate to eham
   Home   Help Search  
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Where have all the Quality skilled Ham Ops Gone?  (Read 28961 times)
KS2G
Member

Posts: 732




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2014, 10:26:28 AM »


Last year I set up a Boy Scout station in Vermont. Set the station by the door and began trying to attract interest. Yes, you guess it. We go passed by.

Thousands of others have had a much better experience:

Jamboree on the Air is the largest Scouting event in the world. In 2012 nearly 700,000 Scouts participated with over 13,500 stations operated by 22,500 amateur radio operators in operation from 142 countries around the world.

http://www.k2bsa.net/jota/
http://www.scouting.org/jota.aspx
Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 4880




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2014, 11:46:10 AM »

Are the CW ops losing ground?  No doubt.... but this predicted demise of CW is definitely premature.

I do not feel CW ops are losing ground.

There was, for a good chunk of a century back in the 70's/80's/90's, a very common attitude was that "well you have to learn CW to get the ticket but soon you will upgrade and never have to do CW again".

Today, it's the other way around. "Hey, now that you have a ticket, you can work hard on building up your CW skills in a lot of different ways!".

It is like a breath of fresh air, the young guys coming into CW operations, and often running rings around us old guys!
Logged
KD8MJR
Member

Posts: 5053




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2014, 02:17:36 AM »

It would be true if CW was the only game in town but for most new hams psk31 and other digital formats are gaining ground while CW loses it.
Logged

“A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes.”  (Mark Twain)
K1LEM
Member

Posts: 300




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2014, 05:11:43 AM »

I agree with the OP on one point.


If ham radio operators were more friendly to new hams we might be growing faster, but unfortunately because of the degrading manor in which most new no code hams are treated by a few people the whole hobby is not very inviting.


Its more than just " being friendly". I think you suggested this without elaborating.
One thing I note, radio for non mobile or portable communications to include broadcasting is dead.
Its hard for me to believe the AM broadcast band and our local FM band. Its packed full of the Jesus Hour and right wing corn Jobs on AM. So, the more educated have gone to the internet Ustreams.. etc or direct Video, Audio feeds.

Now, as for an old man's (white boys) pass time, yes HR is still there. But, my question remains, the FCC has denied the reality of it and still gets snarly when certain entities bark for service. Maybe ARRL who knows. Its a crazy waste to tax payers money. There is nothing there to defend or write fines about. Just fuel for word processors and ESQ ..s. Roll Eyes
Logged
K1LEM
Member

Posts: 300




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2014, 06:57:40 AM »

... the whole hobby is not very inviting.

Is that why the number of license-holders is at an all-time high?

))= Hey, don't jump to conclusions to numbers. Numbers don't lie, but liars use them.
If you look at the bulk of current HR licenses, they are of the NOCODE Technician. Of course , every license is NOCODE, if it a new license. Facts: FCC keeps dead wood and old never used licenses on books for TEN years, that's a decade.
At my University, we had 15 persons with techs that never used a HR, and the licenses att expired unrenewed, N1OKA and many other vacated calls.. of that type. But, the ARRL , makes no such distinctions. Easy access makes more clones, but clones do-not indicate more actual operators. They are what I call "paper holders"
Logged
W5CBO
Member

Posts: 97




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2014, 07:44:58 AM »

Repeat after me It's a Plug N Play world now.
Logged
N3QE
Member

Posts: 4880




Ignore
« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2014, 07:57:16 AM »

Easy access makes more clones, but clones do-not indicate more actual operators. They are what I call "paper holders"

I know I spent a number of years from college onwards, inactive and just a "paper holder". I knew I liked radio and kept on renewing my license, but didn't have hardly any opportunity to get on the air. Then I came back big time.

I know from conversations with other EXTREMELY ACTIVE hams both at local clubs and on the air, that this is very common, to be away from the hobby for a while - decades even - then come back stronger than ever.

Decades ago I think you had to prove activity to renew a license, but I think it's great we've moved beyond that.
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9930




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2014, 09:21:27 AM »

I too was a long time "retread". I got my tech ( never was a novice) in April of 1978, and was active until around Christmas of  1982.

I did keep my license current and renewed until 2001 when I got back in to ham radio. I was still a "two meter Tech". but finally decided to try to up grade. I found I could be grandfathered in as a general, which I did and then a week later I tested and passed my Extra.  (It was always the code that kept me from up grading, I had 8 years of electronics in the USAF.)

 So now as an old man with more spendable money than when I was a youth ( early thirties) in 1978 and starting a family, was a much more active ham. In 2001, ( I was then in my early 50's) and was making and spending a considerable significant more cash on radios, and it was more fun to me.

I find that I have as many or more ham friends now than back then by a large amount. Back then I did 2m and 10 m phone and some poor cw on the novice areas of the bands.

Now ( with the help of my computer) I do 1.2g, 900MHz, 440MHz, 220 MHz, 6m, 2m,  and all the HF bands from 10m to 160m, on most of them AM/FM/ssb/cw/psk31/ as I choose. I do some DXing and rag chewing and even some contesting.  I can do pretty good on a cw contest with the help of my computer assisting me in decoding and sending my exchange. I do some paper chasing, attend local club meetings, and mostly find radio more fun now.

SO don't be disparaging with the "no code " techs.  Bye the way now a days they are just Techs, the "no code" Tech is no longer a category.

And CW is not dead, get on the air on any contest weekend with a cw contest on, and you will find it hard to find a place to operate ssb. CW is live and doing well.

73 all and remember this obsession is only a hobby, right?
Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 732




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2014, 10:30:31 AM »

... the whole hobby is not very inviting.

Is that why the number of license-holders is at an all-time high?

))= Hey, don't jump to conclusions to numbers. Numbers don't lie, but liars use them.
If you look at the bulk of current HR licenses, they are of the NOCODE Technician. Of course , every license is NOCODE, if it a new license. Facts: FCC keeps dead wood and old never used licenses on books for TEN years, that's a decade.
At my University, we had 15 persons with techs that never used a HR, and the licenses att expired unrenewed, N1OKA and many other vacated calls.. of that type. But, the ARRL , makes no such distinctions. Easy access makes more clones, but clones do-not indicate more actual operators. They are what I call "paper holders"

Oh, please.

Give it a rest.

The No Code issue was settled years ago -- WORLDWIDE, with most countries eliminating the code requirement well before the U.S.

The number of U.S. licensees is about evenly divided between Techs and holders of General, Advanced and Extra Class licenses. (See: http://ah0a.org/FCC/Licenses.html)

As for "paper holders", it has ALWAYS been the case that large numbers of new licensees never get on the air -- and has ALWAYS been the case that the best guess as to the number of active U.S. hams is about 50% of those holding licenses.

Meanwhile (as show in the link above) the number of new licenses has steadily increased for the past seven years, except for a slight decline from June to July of this year.

So there must be SOMETHING that's sufficiently attractive about Amateur Radio, at least initially, for all those folks to go to the trouble of getting a ticket.


Logged
KC2UGV
Member

Posts: 529




Ignore
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2014, 05:29:14 PM »

The fact that the OP is the one who posted this is making laugh my arse off.

I'm assuming the "Qualified skilled operators" are not jamming the patriot net.
Logged
K1LEM
Member

Posts: 300




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2014, 06:41:41 AM »

.
[/quote]

Is that why the number of license-holders is at an all-time high?
[/quote]

))= Hey, don't jump to conclusions to numbers. Numbers don't lie, but liars use them.
If you look at the bulk of current HR licenses, they are of the NOCODE Technician. Of course , every license is NOCODE, if it a new license. Facts: FCC keeps dead wood and old never used licenses on books for TEN years, that's a decade.
At my University, we had 15 persons with techs that never used a HR, and the licenses att expired unrenewed, N1OKA and many other vacated calls.. of that type. But, the ARRL , makes no such distinctions. Easy access makes more clones, but clones do-not indicate more actual operators. They are what I call "paper holders"
[/quote]

The number of U.S. licensees is about evenly divided between Techs and holders of General, Advanced and Extra Class licenses. (See: http://ah0a.org/FCC/Licenses.html)

So there must be SOMETHING that's sufficiently attractive about Amateur Radio, at least initially, for all those folks to go to the trouble of getting a ticket.



[/quote]

What is see, looking back ten years, more inside the HF no code,  easy exam gateway. And still about three to one ratio of techs vs. any HF license. Its interesting to watch " Advanced" over a decade, because the fall outs will be deceased or just didn't renew, or much more unlikely, upgraded to Extra.
I question your 50 percent numbers of actives however as that would imply 350 stations actually active and that just isn't true. I suggest its more 5 to 8 percent, or 40,000 actives. Even that number seems way over what actually is observed, Kiss
Logged
KS2G
Member

Posts: 732




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2014, 03:38:25 PM »


I question your 50 percent numbers of actives however as that would imply 350 (sic) stations actually active and that just isn't true. I suggest its more 5 to 8 percent, or 40,000 actives. Even that number seems way over what actually is observed, Kiss

Only 40,000 active hams in the United States?
You've got to be kidding.

An ARRL survey of its members found 85% active -- so with 157,000 League members, that would mean 133,000 active, minimum.

Based on your posts, it appears that you only consider someone "active" (or a "Quality Skilled Ham Op") if they're on HF -- preferably on cw.

Sorry, there are loads of active "Quality Skilled Ham Ops" only on VHF/UHF.

Sure, many of them are your dreaded "No Code" Technicians who just gab on FM repeaters. But they're still active, any many of them upgrade.

What's more, many of them are active, trained ARES and RACES members with multiple FEMA IS-00x00 certifications. How many do you have?

Many techs do VHF/UHF weak-signal work on cw and/or ssb.
How many Grid Squares have you worked on 50 MHz and above?

How about satellites?
Lots of Techs on those.
How many of the birds have you ever worked?
Do you even know how?
Logged
N6AJR
Member

Posts: 9930




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2014, 03:49:35 PM »

heck, I got 40,000 in my logs... there are more than that out there, or have I worked everyone:)
Logged
AA7RX
Member

Posts: 41




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2014, 09:08:24 PM »

I agree with the OP on one point.

1) it's almost impossible to get young people interested in Ham Radio and that's mainly because it's a very old technology that has been surpassed by the Internet and all the communication abilities it provides.

If ham radio operators were more friendly to new hams we might be growing faster, but unfortunately because of the degrading manor in which most new no code hams are treated by a few people the whole hobby is not very inviting.

As for CW that's never going to make a come back. As the older hams go SK the number of CW operators will dwindle with no new ones to take their place.


In my experience, kids are still interested in ham radio and CW. However, you're right about the degrading manner older hams treat those of us who joined the hobby after the code requirements were removed. Kids these days won't tolerate that sort of BS, and honestly, nobody should be treated poorly for not getting licensed under the old rules.

My 12 year old son is studying for his license, in between hockey, school, and Minecraft sessions. He loves watching and listening when I work on the radio, and he plays with the CW apps I put on his iPod. I've been very careful to shelter him from the negativity I see on ham forums, though. If he saw the crap being posted on some of these boards, he'd give up before even taking his exam.

My teenage daughter, on the other hand, is studying for her first license purely to eventually earn the new laptop I promised to buy if/when she gets her Amateur Extra license. She's secretly interested in radio, but she's at the age when it's not cool to like Mom's hobbies.

As far as CW is concerned, I'm really not worried about it fading away. I got licensed in 2010, but I'm actively learning CW--for fun! Not because it's being forced on me, but because I honestly want to learn it. To me, that's the best reason ever to learn something new.
Logged
K2GWK
Member

Posts: 707


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #29 on: August 15, 2014, 06:06:26 AM »

The fact that the OP is the one who posted this is making laugh my arse off.

I'm assuming the "Qualified skilled operators" are not jamming the patriot net.

That is the most ironic part of this whole thread. The OP is ranting about skilled operators when he, himself has received a warning from the FCC about poor operating practices. It would seem all he would have to do is look in to the closest mirror and ask the same question.
Logged

Guy
Lawn Guyland, New York

K2GWK Website
Pages: Prev 1 [2] 3 Next   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!