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Author Topic: 425DX 4 MB Ram Gateway 2000 Nomad laptop Questions  (Read 9605 times)
W8JX
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Posts: 6039




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« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2014, 05:34:44 AM »

Not using a non existant USB port, he's using an ide socket. The only problem might be finding a small enough one.
As for doorstop, this is dos. Not Windows 8, not like he's going to use it for internet or office suite.

I know its a DOS machine at best. I have a stack of Dell Pentium 75 and 90 MHz laptops that was given 8+ years ago. I was going to do something with them and never did. They would make nice DOS laptops.





Do they work?
Do they have hard drives or at least the hard drive caddies?
Power Supply (Supplies)?


They are complete. Even have Dell carry cases/bags for them. As I recall they have 13 inch displays. I am not home right now to pull one. I do remember that they have 800 x 600 display resolution too.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2014, 05:59:45 AM by W8JX » Logged

--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 570




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« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2014, 02:39:54 AM »

Not using a non existant USB port, he's using an ide socket. The only problem might be finding a small enough one.
As for doorstop, this is dos. Not Windows 8, not like he's going to use it for internet or office suite.

I know its a DOS machine at best. I have a stack of Dell Pentium 75 and 90 MHz laptops that was given 8+ years ago. I was going to do something with them and never did. They would make nice DOS laptops.





Do they work?
Do they have hard drives or at least the hard drive caddies?
Power Supply (Supplies)?


They are complete. Even have Dell carry cases/bags for them. As I recall they have 13 inch displays. I am not home right now to pull one. I do remember that they have 800 x 600 display resolution too.

I can stop up and take them off your hands. Saturday would be good
.
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W8JX
Member

Posts: 6039




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« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2014, 05:10:20 AM »


I can stop up and take them off your hands. Saturday would be good
.

Will not be home this Saturday but possibly next weekend
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--------------------------------------
All posted wireless using Win 8.1 RT, a Android tablet using 4G/LTE/WiFi or Sprint Note 3.
W4KYR
Member

Posts: 570




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« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2014, 06:06:37 AM »


I can stop up and take them off your hands. Saturday would be good
.

Will not be home this Saturday but possibly next weekend

OK sounds good
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AE4RV
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Posts: 963


WWW

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« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2014, 08:28:44 AM »

I have a TRS-80 Pocket Computer and a similar one by Sharp. What's your question?
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W4KYR
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Posts: 570




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« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2014, 10:27:39 AM »

I have a TRS-80 Pocket Computer and a similar one by Sharp. What's your question?


Does it have a built in terminal program, if not how would I load it on to it? And is there an serial adapter to connect it to a TNC? Have you used it for Packet Radio or know anyone who has?

I got this awhile back from my brother in law, it needs to have the internal (MR44) batteries replaced. Before I go buy batteries for it, I wanted to know if anyone used it for packet radio or adapted it for ham radio uses.

Thanks

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AE4RV
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« Reply #21 on: August 22, 2014, 10:54:06 AM »

There were a few different models. I think you'd do better in ham radio with a Model 100 portable computer. It had a terminal program.

The pocket PCs were very simple computers which were basically fancy calculators that had the BASIC computer language built in and two kilobytes of RAM. Software was available in cartridge form and maybe cassettes but I never got the tape adapter. I don't know if they offered a terminal program or even a modem, I suspect not. There is what looks like a serial/parallel port but I don't know what if any standard it is. I know it was for connecting it to a small printer/plotter but don't know if it has other uses. The thing only has one line of text (16 characters IIRC) and would not be fun to communicate on. The keyboard is not for touch typing, either.

This is the TRS one I have:
http://oldcomputers.net/trs80pc2.html

I don't know what model Sharp PPC I have, it looks a bit smaller and newer than my TRS-80 PPC 2.

I'd suspect you would want a model 100 or similar: http://oldcomputers.net/kc.html
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 570




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« Reply #22 on: August 22, 2014, 12:26:10 PM »

There were a few different models. I think you'd do better in ham radio with a Model 100 portable computer. It had a terminal program.

The pocket PCs were very simple computers which were basically fancy calculators that had the BASIC computer language built in and two kilobytes of RAM. Software was available in cartridge form and maybe cassettes but I never got the tape adapter. I don't know if they offered a terminal program or even a modem, I suspect not. There is what looks like a serial/parallel port but I don't know what if any standard it is. I know it was for connecting it to a small printer/plotter but don't know if it has other uses. The thing only has one line of text (16 characters IIRC) and would not be fun to communicate on. The keyboard is not for touch typing, either.

This is the TRS one I have:
http://oldcomputers.net/trs80pc2.html

I don't know what model Sharp PPC I have, it looks a bit smaller and newer than my TRS-80 PPC 2.

I'd suspect you would want a model 100 or similar: http://oldcomputers.net/kc.html


Thanks for the info, I'd rather not spend any money getting batteries for this if it has no practical use for Packet or Ham Radio. It has the docking station and printer and an AC adapter for the printer.

I'll take a look at the model 100. I also heard that the HP 320LX Palm Pilot could be good for packet it has a terminal program in it. 
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AE4RV
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« Reply #23 on: August 22, 2014, 12:38:52 PM »

Here's some pics of a 100 in action: https://imgur.com/a/ljDBD

Nice keyboard and they have legendary battery life.
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 570




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« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2014, 12:54:47 PM »

Thanks for the link, looks like the Model 100 would be the way to go.


And here is the website which got me looking into using one of these "Pocket PC's" for Packet Radio.


http://www.ke4nyv.com/portapacket.htm
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KE7TMA
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Posts: 471




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« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2014, 01:58:10 PM »

You will have a VERY hard time finding a HD. I suggest just running it from boot able floppy disk with apps on it. It really is not worth any investment otherwise.

Not true.  He can use an ATA to CF / SD card adapter and simply put everything on the SD or CF card.
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N1DVJ
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Posts: 509




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« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2014, 09:41:13 AM »

yes - you can do all of that. ..
- use both dos & win_311 - if you have them available to use.

do run from a hdd, if available, rather than from floppies.
 - there is still some fun to be had, in using that old stuff,
& some of those old programs that ran on either platform,
are still quite useful.

- the bios may not accept a hdd of larger than 6.4Gb in size,
& it may even have a limit of 512Mb in size.

dos / fat16 will limit you to 2gb partition.

The limit will be about 540MB or less unless you can translate.  It has to do with the maximum number of heads, cylinders, and sectors in an int13 call.  If you bump a limit, that's it.  Unless you can translate.  Then it's about 2.5GB.  To go beyond that, they you need to fool the system by sector and/or cluster size, and that you have to do with drivers, not configurations.  WIN 3.11 implies DOS 5.0 or 6.0  Both should be fine. 
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W4KYR
Member

Posts: 570




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« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2014, 01:17:12 PM »

yes - you can do all of that. ..
- use both dos & win_311 - if you have them available to use.

do run from a hdd, if available, rather than from floppies.
 - there is still some fun to be had, in using that old stuff,
& some of those old programs that ran on either platform,
are still quite useful.

- the bios may not accept a hdd of larger than 6.4Gb in size,
& it may even have a limit of 512Mb in size.

dos / fat16 will limit you to 2gb partition.

The limit will be about 540MB or less unless you can translate.  It has to do with the maximum number of heads, cylinders, and sectors in an int13 call.  If you bump a limit, that's it.  Unless you can translate.  Then it's about 2.5GB.  To go beyond that, they you need to fool the system by sector and/or cluster size, and that you have to do with drivers, not configurations.  WIN 3.11 implies DOS 5.0 or 6.0  Both should be fine. 

I have the exact list of heads, cylinders and sectors listed in the bios. I'll find them later and list them. It still boots, not sure for how long though the hd will hold out. At first it didn't boot at all until I put the current date in and then it booted right to the prompt and then I typed in win and it booted to Win 3.1.  I could probably run Baypac on this.

http://www.tigertronics.com/baymodem.htm

If I format the replacement hard drive with less than 540 MB, then it should work then regardless if the actual hard drive is 10 GB. That is my thinking...
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N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 509




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« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2014, 05:30:31 PM »

yes - you can do all of that. ..
- use both dos & win_311 - if you have them available to use.

do run from a hdd, if available, rather than from floppies.
 - there is still some fun to be had, in using that old stuff,
& some of those old programs that ran on either platform,
are still quite useful.

- the bios may not accept a hdd of larger than 6.4Gb in size,
& it may even have a limit of 512Mb in size.

dos / fat16 will limit you to 2gb partition.

The limit will be about 540MB or less unless you can translate.  It has to do with the maximum number of heads, cylinders, and sectors in an int13 call.  If you bump a limit, that's it.  Unless you can translate.  Then it's about 2.5GB.  To go beyond that, they you need to fool the system by sector and/or cluster size, and that you have to do with drivers, not configurations.  WIN 3.11 implies DOS 5.0 or 6.0  Both should be fine. 
It's not the size at 540MB, it's the geometry of the INT13 call.  And, as I said, if the drive 'translates', then it doesn't matter. 

Also, some BIOSes could be tricked into 'prompting' for parameters.  Even some of the IBM PC-AT BIOSes.  The last version of the PC-AT BIOS would support 8mhz and if you selected drive type 'F' it would prompt for cylinders, heads, and sectors.  A lot of other brand BIOSes would do it as well.  Some had 'alternate' parameters that would come up if you selected the last type.  In the 146818 chip, selecting the last one could trick the BIOS into another byte for the enhanced table.
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N1DVJ
Member

Posts: 509




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« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2014, 05:36:53 PM »

I have the exact list of heads, cylinders and sectors listed in the bios. I'll find them later and list them. It still boots, not sure for how long though the hd will hold out. At first it didn't boot at all until I put the current date in and then it booted right to the prompt and then I typed in win and it booted to Win 3.1.  I could probably run Baypac on this.

http://www.tigertronics.com/baymodem.htm

If I format the replacement hard drive with less than 540 MB, then it should work then regardless if the actual hard drive is 10 GB. That is my thinking...
If the date was trashed, than the 146818a chip probably lost it's backup power.  If that happens, the BIOS on boot invalidates the chip and won't boot from HD, at least on most systems.  Once you edit anything in the chip, like date or time, writing the update to the chip recalculates a new checksum.

Some boards use batteries for the chip backup.  Some use big caps.  Some even used NiCad coin cells.  If it's rechargable, it may recover and hold the CMOS, but it probably won't last long.  Normally you could expect months of backup, or even a year or more. 
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