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Friends Remembered Home | Friends Detail

BRUCE STERNSTEIN (K2RTH)


OCT 14,2003


PROBABLY THE BEST 6 METER OPERATOR THAT EVER LIVED. 73 BRUCE FROM K4LFK

Contributed by: Len Klein (K4LFK)


Bruce used to frequent one of my websites (www.dxers.info) for several years. During that time I made a friend whom I'll never forget. He used to rag on my website pretty bad but was always the first to let me know when something needed improvement...and that along with his twisted (but fun) sense of humor made his imprint on me. I'll never forget this guy, he used to work 6m stuff that would make us ALL drool! Incredible! Rest in Peace Bruce! You were one of the best !

Contributed by: Tim R. Havens (NW0W)


I'm sorry for not seeing this tribute earlier. Bruce, even though some time has passed since you became an SK, I still miss you. I met Bruce at Tim's website, hunting 6M DX, and, when not spotting DX, trading sarcastic comments about whatever/whomever fell into our crosshairs. It was great fun! After time, Bruce invited me into a private AOL chat room where he and some others hung out for Florida-specific 6M conversation. We spent hours upon hours there, and in and amongst our wildly funny conversations, he taught me more about radio propagation than all the books I'd ever read, and all the people I'd ever met in, at the time, 25 years of being a licensed Amateur. This point was really made clear to me in the ARRL 10 Meter Contest - I think it was 2000, or 2001. It was the beginning hours of the contest, and as I tuned up and down the band, I realized that I was noting the type of propagation along with the station I was working - "Oh - nice TE". "Good ground wave signal", etc. I'd been HF contesting for 25 years, and that was the first I'd ever done that, and it was due to Bruce's tutoring. Bruce was also responsible for alerting me to what, to date, has been the most interesting DXing of my Amateur career - working JA's via Long Path on 6M. Bruce was aware of that path, and worked them on nearly a daily basis in the fall of 2001, and spring 2002. Unfortunately, conditions rarely extended into EL98; Miami, where he lived, was much better situated for that path. Finally, on 6 April 2002, fighting severe power line noise, I was able to work a handful of JA's. It was a thrill beyond words. That opening also put me on the cusp of making Ham Radio history - the first United States 6M QSO with Taiwan! BX2AB heard me, and spotted me on the the DX Cluster. Unfortunately for me he couldn't penetrate the S6 power line noise I was fighting, but luckily for Bruce, HE was able to work him and secure that little bit of history!! Look for the QSO here: http://www.qsl.net/bv2dp/bv50first.htm 73, Bruce.

Contributed by: Steve Sacco (NN4X)


I'm sorry for not seeing this tribute page earlier. Bruce, even though some time has passed since you became an SK, I still miss you. I met Bruce at Tim's website, hunting 6M DX. When not spotting DX, we enjoyed trading sarcastic comments about whatever/whomever fell into our cross-hairs. It was great fun! After awhile, Bruce invited me to join a private AOL chat room, where he and some others hung out for Florida-specific 6M conversation. We spent hours upon hours there, and in and amongst our wildly funny conversations, he taught me more about radio propagation than all the books I'd ever read, and all the people I'd ever met, in, at the time, 25 years of being a licensed Amateur. This point was really made clear to me in the ARRL 10 Meter Contest - I think it was 2000, or 2001. It was the beginning hours of the contest, and as I tuned up and down the band, I realized that I was taking specific mental note of the type of propagation associated with the station I was working - "Oh - nice TE". "Good ground wave signal", etc. I'd been HF contesting for 25 years, and that was the first I'd ever done that, and it was due to Bruce's tutoring. Bruce was also responsible for alerting me to what, to date, has been the most interesting DXing of my Amateur career - working JA's via Long Path on 6M. Bruce was aware of that path, and worked them on nearly a daily basis in the fall of 2001, and spring 2002. Unfortunately, conditions rarely extended into EL98; Miami, where he lived, was much better situated for that path. Finally, on 6 April 2002, fighting severe power line noise, I was able to work a handful of JA's. It was a thrill beyond words. That opening also put me on the cusp of making Ham Radio history - the first United States 6M QSO with Taiwan! BX2AB heard me, and spotted me on the the DX Cluster. Unfortunately for me he couldn't penetrate the S6 power line noise I was fighting, but luckily for Bruce, HE was able to work him and secure that little bit of history!! Look for the QSO here: http://www.qsl.net/bv2dp/bv50first.htm 73, Bruce - I'll never forget you. de Steve NN4X

Contributed by: Steve Sacco (NN4X)


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