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Reviews Categories | Microphone Equalizers & Transmit Audio Accessories | Sena SR10 Bluetooth Hub Help


Reviews Summary for Sena SR10 Bluetooth Hub
Sena SR10 Bluetooth Hub Reviews: 1 Average rating: 4.0/5 MSRP: $199
Description: "The SR10 is a Class 1 Bluetooth Two-way Radio adapter based on Bluetooth
2.1+EDR technology. You can connect various two-way radio devices in the
market by using SR10 and may talk wirelessly using Bluetooth headsets in the
market. SR10 has two AUX ports that enable you to connect non-Bluetooth
devices such as radar detector or GPS navigation. Along with SR10, you can
talk by phone or by two-way radios at the same time, listen to alarm signal
from radar detector and listen to the guides from GPS Navigation. The SR10
may cover such a various application areas as motorcycle group riding,
outdoor sports and activities or security."
Product is in production.
More info: http://senabluetooth.com/products/sr10.php?tab_menu=overview
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KF6RQR Rating: 4/5 Jan 12, 2012 12:36 Send this review to a friend
It gets my phone, radio, & GPS on my bluetooth successfully  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I bought this as a bluetooth solution for my motorcycle, but it definitely can be used for many other things as well. I needed a device that could connect my Android phone and my Yaesu VX-7R to my motorcycle bluetooth headset simultaneously with a separate push to talk button for the radio on my handle bar grips. This does exactly that. The SR10 is only a hub with PTT and you'd have to have your own bluetooth headset to use it.

The hub has a belt clip & handle bar clip and is a giant PTT button itself. It also comes with an accessory wired PTT button that can be put elsewhere. It is perfect for using on a motorcycle, bicycle, car steering wheel, and even on foot. It can be used while volunteering at events to be able to communicate with people on radio and phone simultaneously without any wires dangling from your ear or taking your phone or radio off your belt. I can also see a base or mobile situation where the radio uses some other simpler bluetooth adapter to pair wirelessly to the SR10 on your belt which then pairs wireless to your bluetooth earpiece. You could get up and walk around your shack or set up a lawn chair outside your vehicle and still use your radio like normal (plus have make/receive phone calls).

I rated it 4/5 only because it doesn't play friendly with smartphone apps. It works perfect with my radio though. My wife reports that my audio quality was great, even while cruising 80mph on a motorcycle with the wind in my face. Also, the firmware must be updated immediately after purchase because the factory-shipped firmware does not support voice dial or adjusting the mic gain on radio transmissions.


My set up:
1. The Yaesu VX-7R is wire connected to the SR10 Bluetooth Hub with the accessory cable purchased from Sena separately. The 3.5mm connector on the cable did not fit into the recessed waterproof Yaesu headset port, but I was able to get it to work eventually by shaving off some excess plastic on the cable.

2. My phone (Motorola Triumph) is paired with the SR10 under the Hands Free Protocol (HFP). The SR10 is only supports HFP and cannot be used for sound coming from any phone apps such as music or GPS. It only works for phone calls. The phone call audio is mixed with the radio audio in the SR10 and sent via bluetooth to the headset.

3. My phone is also selectively paired directly to my bluetooth headset under the Advanced Audio Distribution Profile (A2DP). This sends the "app" or "media" sound from my phone directly to my headset so that I can listen to music, gps, etc. while not talking on the phone or radio. This can only be done with both a headset and a phone that support selectively pairing two separate devices for HFP and A2DP. If you only care about phone calls and not about media sounds from your phone, this connection is unnecessary and most of the glitches I will describe will not apply to you.

4. The SR10 is selectively paired with my bluetooth headset under the HFP protocol. This means that my headset thinks that my SR10 is a cell phone.


Results:
My headset stays connected directly to my phone's media sound (music, gps) until it hears audio from the SR10 (phone call or my Yaesu). At that point, it mutes my phone media sound connects to the SR10 until the SR10 audio is silent for 5 seconds. The 5 second time is adjustable when connecting it to a computer. The headset mic only works when connected to SR10 audio and not when the headset directly connected to my phone. I am using a Sena brand motorcycle headset and imagine the prioritizing of the audio channels will vary with other brand headsets.

Pushing the PTT button switches my headset's audio from my phone media to the radio/phone call mix and also transmits. Pushing the call button on my headset initiates voice dialer or answers calls on my phone. It does not end calls though which can be bad if someone doesn't answer your call and it rings forever. It takes my headset about 1 second to switch from my direct phone bluetooth connection to the SR10 bluetooth connection. This results in me transmitting 1 second of silence over the radio each time I press the PTT after a 5 second or longer silence on a given frequency. I imagine the 1 second delay is due to my particular headset and the lack of end call ability is the SR10's fault, but I could be wrong. Again, these glitches may not exist if you don't pair your phone directly with your headset and with the SR10 as two separate connections.

Conclusion:
Overall, this device works well for my motorcycle situation, but has some phone related annoyances because it can't bluetooth pair with A2DP. It is flawless as a bluetooth radio adaptor though. The SR10 is very innovated and the only device on the market which I know of that mixes multiple communication devices into a single bluetooth headset.
 


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