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Reviews Categories | Antennas: HF: Yagi, Quad, Rotary dipole, LPDA | MOSLEY MINI-32 Help


Reviews Summary for MOSLEY MINI-32
Reviews: 14 Average rating: 4.4/5 MSRP: $384.00
Description: 2 ELEMENT 10-15-20
Product is in production.
More info: http://www.mosley-electronics.com/spec%20files/amateur/mini32a.
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M0AUW Rating: 5/5 Jun 7, 2017 07:00 Send this review to a friend
Excellent  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I began experimenting with moxons and realised the directional antennas with good gain was the way to go. The moxon was for 17m and was quite big and I live in a sensitive area in the UK, so that had to come down. I also tried a Hex but again it was just too big. I read the reviews for the Mosely Mini 32-A and promptly bought one. For what I need which is low visual Yagi this is perfect. If you follow the less than brilliant handbook you can't go wrong (I don't think you should be doing this sort of thing if you can't set up this antenna). The only area you need to watch is the measurements for the driven element and the reflector, also if you add an RF choke, it's got to placed correctly next to the attachment points otherwise your SWR will move. The SWR and FB is pretty good, there is a definite improvement on S points over my cobweb and hustler 6BTV, but you have to remember the is not a top of the range Yagi, you get what you pay for. But saying that, for the money this is a good antenna.
 
K6USN Rating: 5/5 Oct 26, 2014 18:45 Send this review to a friend
Works Exceedingly well!  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
I have had several Mosley Yagis in my 50+ years in ham radio and have always been pleased with the build quality. With a small vacation cottage, space was limited and I chose the TA32 Jr. Assembly was simple and fast. The antenna weighs around 12 pounds and is easy to mount on a tower or simple mast.
This past weekend I participated in a world wide DX contest and worked 28 countries with the TA 32 Jr in one morning of causual operation. A huge improvement over a dipole or vertical! I highly recommend this simple, easy to assemble antenna
to anyone with space limitations. It presents a
low profile and is not an eyesore to neighbors.
 
RK3TD Rating: 4/5 Aug 11, 2013 23:01 Send this review to a friend
Antenna whip up   Time owned: 0 to 3 months
Yes! It is simple, fast, lightweight etc.
But I think that antenna does not match the HP stations. It is better than 5/8 GP, but only 300...500 watts possible. I use it only for RX antenna.
 
K4DZR Rating: 5/5 Aug 6, 2013 20:06 Send this review to a friend
GREAT LIGHTWEIGHT BEAM  Time owned: more than 12 months
Purchased as a back up beam and to use at field Day although it never made it to the FD site. Had fun working DX at 10 ft elevation with low swr on all bands. Have it mounted now at 48FT on a. rohn 45g tower. It is really a hot little performer. Work Europe with ease and longest to the far east so far is Indonesia. Sometimes use an Als-600 amp with it.
Highly recommend this antenna if you are looking for a lightweight beam (10lbs) with great swr and easy construction.
 
KI6OSH Rating: 5/5 Nov 26, 2012 15:10 Send this review to a friend
No complaints...  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
I've had this relatively small yagi on my roof for almost one year so I figured I'd better let the radio world know that it's a great little antenna! Not a contest antenna but perfect for a small, rooftop easy to maintain yagi beam. I have it on a five foot mast with a RS tripod mount so I can reach the elements using a small stepladder while on my roof. I can't have a tower so this works perfectly. Made many contacts worldwide so it does get out using 500-600 watts or usually just 100 watts will work fine. Since it only weights 8 lbs. it was fairly easy to put together and mount. I use a Hy-Gain CD-45II to rotate it and am very glad I purchased this little gem. Great buy for the money and a first beam antenna. I used the exact measurements in the instruction manual. It's about 33 feet above ground. No regrets so far and great customer service with the one call I needed to make while putting it together.
 
K7WXK Rating: 4/5 Dec 17, 2011 11:18 Send this review to a friend
Delivers as advertized  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
After much research and comparison I took a chance and ordered the Mini32 w/WARC kit. It was shipped promptly and received in a week from the factory. As others have testified, the assembly instructions are basic and brief and require some knowledge and logic, but it went together as planned. Initial SWR readings were as predicted with the upper part of 20 meters being around 3:1. I shortened the driven element 1/2" on each end and left it alone until final testing. After mounting it on a 17' mast and based on the roof making a total height of around 25', I tested it and the SWR readings were mostly flat in all but the extreme lower end of 10 meters where it was 1.9:1 and the upper end of 20 where it is still high at 2.5:1 All these readings are easily handled by my FT990 AT. The WARC element is practically flat on both 12 and 17 meters.

Now for the results: Reports of my transmitted signal are continually 1 to 3 S-units higher than my R-5 Vertical. Likewise, received signals are equally improved. I doubt the front to back ratio is 17:1, but further testing is warranted before I make any evaluation. Front to side is also not terribly impressive. Noise level is higher than my vertical, but that is likely because it is closer to the AC wiring in the house.

The antenna is currently being rotated by an RCA TV rotator. So far, everything is working fine. I did get some RF feedback into the rotator control, but that was cured by wrappng the control cable around a group of torroids. Now everything works as advertized.

Summary: Extremely light (12 lbs) and compact and easy to install. Marked improvement over a dipole or vertical. For those wanting performance increase along with light/small package, this is the antenna for you, all at a price that doesn't break the bank. For me it fills the bill just fine.

Disclaimer: Don't expect an "out of body experience" and a quantum leap in performance. It's not a SteppIR or a full size log periodic. Remember you get what you pay for.

For the reasons stated above I call it a good, but not great, antenna.
 
N9GUU Rating: 5/5 Nov 3, 2011 12:32 Send this review to a friend
Great Antenna!  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
Because of location, I needed a small directional antenna and the Mini-32 looked like my best bet. I assembled it according to the book measurements, put it on a pipe up abot 10' and applied RF to check the SWR. Nothing higher than 1.5:1 - even worked a W6 from 9 land at 10'. I installed it up about 30' and SWR remained the same. Worked a lot of DX. I have a modest 100W station and I'm constantly being told "great signal". I know it's not a TA-33 but it works very well. You won't be sorry.
 
KE8Y Rating: 4/5 Sep 7, 2011 17:24 Send this review to a friend
Nice antenna; good value  Time owned: more than 12 months
I installed my Mini-32A on the roof of my ranch style house using a 4’ tripod and 1.25” dia x 10’ Radio Shack antenna mast. The overall mounting height is approximately 26’. I am not using any guys on the mast, and so far the assembly has weathered several wind and ice storms with no problems with either the mast or antenna. The Radio Shack TV antenna rotor that I purchased and installed started having problems within the first year, so I replaced it with a 1970’s vintage Alliance Mfg Co., Model U-100 rotor that I had lying around. The U-100 does a nice job rotating the antenna a full 360 degrees in about a minute. A "heavy duty" TV antenna rotor is really all that you need to turn the Mini-32A, but new, good quality TV rotors (like the U-100) are hard to find these days.

At my installation I have found that the Mini-32A generally meets Mosley’s specs except for front-to-back (F/B) ratio. The observed F/B is only about 1 S-unit (6 dB) on 20 meters and a little better on 15 and 10 meters. Specs say the "average" F/B should be 17 dB (almost 3 S-units). I am sure that the F/B could be improved by mounting the antenna higher and in the clear, but I promised my XYL that there would be no guy wires on the house so I have accepted the F/B as is. The antenna exhibits very deep nulls from front-to-side on all three bands however. I generally receive good to very good signal reports, and I rarely fail to make contact with the stations that I call.

Mosley’s assembly manual is OK if you are an experienced Yagi builder, but it may be difficult to follow if you are a first timer. The dimensions of the assembled antenna are not included in the manual, so it is not possible to check your work when you’re done. I mentioned this to Mosley and hopefully they will include the dimensions in a future revision of the manual.

The only dimensions that are mentioned in the manual are for setting the exposed length of the element immediately after the traps (the smaller inboard devices are loading coils, the larger outboard devices are the traps). After much experimenting and many trips up and down the ladder, I have found that the factory suggested set points of 12.5” exposed length on the driven element and 14.0” exposed length on the reflector element, work the best for me. With these set points, lowest SWR on my Mini occurs at 14.05 Mhz, 21.20 Mhz, and 28.30 Mhz. The bandwidth on all three bands is essentially as advertised (i.e. very good). Mosley suggests not using an antenna analyzer for adjusting the antenna, but I found that the results from my antenna analyzer are very close to the actual results using 100W output from my rig. I sometimes use an antenna tuner when working CW at the very bottom of 15 meters.

If you choose to install the coaxial cable RF choke mentioned in the manual, follow the directions exactly as written. Excessive lead length between the choke and connection to the driven element will lower the resonant frequency of the antenna. I tried using a Hy-Gain BN-86 1:1 balun instead of the coax choke, but it lowered the resonant frequency of the antenna, even with short leads. I also tried the "Ugly Balun" 1:1 choke but it also affected the resonant frequency of the antenna. After much wasted time and effort, I reinstalled the coaxial choke suggested in the antenna manual.

The antenna is rated for 500W on CW and is a good match for the AL-811 amp. But be careful when using an amplifier and do not exceed the power limitations of the antenna. I inadvertently tuned up my AL-811 amp with the Mini connected and blew out a trap. It is best to tune the amp into a dummy load at reduced power, and then transfer to the Mini for final tuning. Increase power to the Mini only after final tuning is complete. When using the amp on CW, I limit power to the antenna at 350 watts to be on the safe side.

I found the customer service and shipping at Mosley to be very good overall. Mosley also has an excellent article on their web site that explains how the Mosely trap system works – see “Frequently asked Questions”. The article was indispensable when I was trouble shooting the antenna and helped me find the blown trap. I purchased a replacement trap assembly from Mosley over the phone, and received it in just a couple of days. The price was reasonable too.

I installed my Mosley Mini-32A in May 2008 - just over three years ago as I write this. I have been pleased with the antenna’s overall performance and quality of materials. I still think it was a good buy and I would definitely buy another Mosley if something were to happen to this one.
 
W7MJM Rating: 5/5 Nov 8, 2010 07:48 Send this review to a friend
A beautiful beam!  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
After years of using wire antennas and verticals, I finally decided to put up a beam. I wanted a tribander that was light weight, with minimal wind surface area, a neighbor-friendly profile and decent performance. At 8 lbs assembled weight, a 2.5 square foot wind surface area, an 8.75 foot turning radius and performance typical of a 2 element yagi, Mosley's Mini-32a fit the bill.

I had considered a hex beam, but preferred the traditional look and lighter weight of the Mosley to the upturned umbrella look and somewhat heavier weight of a hex.

The Mini-32a was easy to assemble, tune and install on a 5 foot TV tripod, lag-bolted to the roof rafters. The antenna sits atop a 2 foot tall, thick-wall aluminum mast, turned by a TV rotor atop a 5 foot steel mast that is secured by the roof tripod. At 10 feet above the roof, the Mini-32a's SWR curves, bandwidth and performance are as documented by Mosley.

I've only been using it a few days now, but signal reports are consistently 1 to 2 S-units better than my trusty Hustler 6BTV vertical @ 10 feet above ground with raised radials.

I am very pleased with my new Mosley Mini-32a. I was also delighted with Mosley's customer service. I had a few questions about assembly and tuning of the beam which were promptly and completely answered by email. Thank you Gary!

P.S. - The Mini-32a continues to perform superbly, but the RadioShack TV rotor I was using to turn it died after only a few days. Replaced the RS rotor with a Yaesu G-450A and I'm happy again! Suggest going with a light-to-medium duty ham rotor from the get go.

73, Martin, W7MJM
 
W7MJM Rating: 5/5 Oct 20, 2010 10:57 Send this review to a friend
A beautiful beam!  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
After years of using wire antennas and verticals, I finally decided to put up a beam. I wanted a tribander that was light weight, with minimal wind surface area, a neighbor-friendly profile and decent performance. At 8 lbs assembled weight, a 2.5 square foot wind surface area, an 8.75 foot turning radius and performance typical of a 2 element yagi, Mosley's Mini-32a fit the bill.

I had considered a hex beam, but preferred the traditional look and lighter weight of the Mosley to the upturned umbrella look and somewhat heavier weight of a hex.

The Mini-32a was easy to assemble, tune and install on a 5 foot TV tripod, lag-bolted to the roof rafters. The antenna sits atop a 2 foot tall, thick-wall aluminum mast, turned by a TV rotor atop a 5 foot steel mast that is secured by the roof tripod. At 10 feet above the roof, the Mini-32a's SWR curves, bandwidth and performance are as documented by Mosley.

I've only been using it a few days now, but signal reports are consistently 1 to 2 S-units better than my trusty Hustler 6BTV vertical @ 10 feet above ground with raised radials.

I am very pleased with my new Mosley Mini-32a. I was also delighted with Mosley's customer service. I had a few questions about assembly and tuning of the beam which were promptly and completely answered by email. Thank you Gary!

73, Martin, W7MJM
 
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