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Reviews Categories | Antennas: VHF/UHF+ Directional (Yagi, quad, etc.) | Arrow Antenna 146/437-10 and 146/437-10WBP Help


Reviews Summary for Arrow Antenna 146/437-10 and 146/437-10WBP
Arrow Antenna 146/437-10 and 146/437-10WBP Reviews: 44 Average rating: 5.0/5 MSRP: $139
Description: Portable Handheld Yagi for 146/437 mhz primarily used for satellite DXing. However, it can be mounted on a camera tripod and used for groundwave communications. 10 watts maximum for handheld operation/150 w maximum when mounted. Elements are made from aluminum "arrow" shafts. Lightweight, and made for quick assembly/disassembly. Weighs about 22 oz.
Product is in production.
More info: http://www.arrowantennas.com
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You can write your own review of the Arrow Antenna 146/437-10 and 146/437-10WBP.

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W7UFX Rating: 5/5 Oct 12, 2013 16:04 Send this review to a friend
Highly recommended  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I wanted to have a portable antenna for two reasons; I live in northwest Montana and wanted to have a decent antenna that I could break down and set up quickly when I'm out in the back country. Secondly I became interested in making contacts through SO-50 using a handheld radio.

My decision to purchase rather than build my own antenna pretty much depended on the cost of materials and the availability of tools. After reading a lot of blogs and articles on the 'net I determined that it was cheaper to purchase one instead. It then became a choice between the Arrow or the Elk. The arrow is cheaper if the duplexer was left out; I thought $59 for the duplexer was unreasonably high. There is information all over the Internet about the construction of this simple device, so I purchased the circuit board from FAR Circuits, the inductors and capacitors from Digi-Key and Newark, and a couple of BNC-BNC patch cables from Universal Radio. Total cost: about $12.
I purchased the 146/437-10BP (the split-boom model. The total cost after shipping was $94.

I received the antenna very quickly and well-packaged. As was described by other reviewers on this site, the quality of workmanship is excellent. While assembling it for the first time, I realized that I would need to take the plastic end caps off the 70cm elements and measure them with a tape measure. It would have been nice if the elements were labeled; with the red end caps installed some of the elements were measured so close to each other it was extremely difficult to determine whether it was part of director 2 or 3, 4, and 5. Directors 3, 4, and 5 are the same length, but D2 is only 1/8" longer. I printed up some cable labels at work and affixed them to the elements of my antenna. With the antenna completely broken down, inlcuding separating the boom parts, I can assemble it in under 4 minutes.
Broken down, the longest piece is 21 1/2", making it easy to stow in a backpack for portable use while hiking in the mountains.

How does it perform? I had to wait for the right opportunity for a satellite pass to occur at a reasonable time, and I am right up against the mountains so I have to have a pass to the west of me at a decent elevation since I'm surrounded by tall pine trees. Recently I had a "perfect pass"; nearly directly overhead at 2030 local time. Using my Kenwood TH-D72A I was able to work a couple of stations with excellent signal reports. I could have done a little better but I am still a "satellite n00b" and still learning how to "drive" my new handheld. The antenna has a broad enough beamwidth so your aim does not have to be perfect- it is more important to twist the antenna for proper polarization. It is amazing how twisting a few degrees can either bring the downlink signal to full-quieting or lose it entirely. Adjusting the downlink frequency for doppler shift is also critical. 5 KHz makes a huge difference in being able to receive.

I am very satisfied with this antenna, and I definately recommend it. The only criticism I have to offer is 1) The elements could be labled and 2) There is no reason why the duplexer needs to be so expensive. $20 is reasonable- $59 is just rediculous. Buy the antenna and build the duplexer yourself.
 
WB8RJY Rating: 5/5 Oct 1, 2013 12:39 Send this review to a friend
unbelieveable performance  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
Received it on thursday. worked many stations on friday, saturday and sunday mornings using nothing
more than a Yaesu FT 50 handheld radio !
signals were strong, noise free and received many
great signal reports.having as much fun as when i was a novice 40 years ago !shipping was very fast.
could not be happier.great product.
It assembles in less than 5 minutes !!!!
thanks you
wB8RJY
 
NM3B Rating: 5/5 Aug 25, 2013 06:19 Send this review to a friend
Super Antenna  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
My XYL and I recently returned from Newfoundland/VO1 which was a vacation/Satellite DXpedition. The Arrow 146/437 was assembled before we departed the home QTH. Our vehicle is a Jeep Grand Cherokee Larado X with plenty of room for antenna and luggage. This model does not have the duplexer so use two 15 foot mini coax cables which I wire tied together forming one small coax. It takes less than 30 seconds to mount it on a camera tripod. The laptop with satellite tracking program is in back of Jeep by antenna. I worked from seven grids while in VO1 land and worked stations from Texas to Germany on all four of the active amateur satellites. To me this was quite a feat with such a small compact antenna. I have never used an Elk antenna but the way the Arrow performed have no desire to even bother with an Elk antenna to make any comparisons. The number of QSL cards I am receiving from this vacation/DXpedition speaks for itself. Anyone with any questions/comments I would be happy to reply.
 
KV6O Rating: 5/5 Aug 1, 2013 11:02 Send this review to a friend
Great antenna, great service.  Time owned: more than 12 months
I have two of these, one is a split boom that I purchased probably almost 10 years ago, the other is a solid boom that I won at a ham meeting, probably 6 or 7 years ago.

I have used them for sats, VHF/UHF rover ops, T-hunting - and have been very pleased with the performance and portability.

I recently ran into Arrow at a local hamfest and received above and beyond customer service for a minor issue - wasn't expecting it at all but it's nice to know the company stands behind their product - one that's many years old!
 
K6LCS Rating: 5/5 Jul 13, 2013 09:27 Send this review to a friend
Outstanding 2M/440 + SATS Performer  Time owned: more than 12 months
There’s plenty of “Elk vs. Arrow” debate on the ‘Net. A lot of it pure rubbish - and not written by people who have actually purchased and own both units as they make their uneducated allegations. A couple of the re-occurring themes ...

“Arrow doesn’t publish gain numbers for their antennas.” This is true. Maybe a little “arrogant” of Arrow, too (grin). But reliable test data is out there - and thousands of owners will attest that their Arrow Antennas are performing magnificently for what they were designed to do.

“The Arrow is hard to transport.” Well, I devote my entire Ford Ranger’s covered pickup bed to my Arrow when I take it places. Rarely has it been disassembled. But to make it absolutely flat, all one needs to do is unscrew the three 2M element pairs, and you have a flat plane of an antenna.

“Arrows are all engineered wrong - they cannot possibly work.” A little story for you. While working for HRO-Anaheim a few years ago, I sold an Arrow to a client for working the satellites. I had first-hand experiences with the Arrow, and therefore could wholeheartedly recommend them to others. The gentleman was waiting for me to open up the shop the next morning, with his Arrow in hand.

“I know antenna theory, and this antenna cannot possibly work - it is engineered all wrong - I want a refund!” - he demanded.

Hmmm. Part of me wanted to discover if he assembled it correctly, and whether or not he actually tested it. But the other part of me was thinking, “Well, I can purchase it myself as an open-box item ... ”

Which I did. And it is the SAME antenna that I have used the past 7+ years for EVERY demo and presentation I have given.

Moral of the story: The Arrow Antenna may not please some engineers. But it sure pleases those who desire to work the FM satellites.

“The Arrow Antenna is much heavier ... “ I have brand-new, un-opened Elk and brand-new, un-opened Arrow in my hands. The Elk package weighs 35.6 ounces. The Arrow weight 33.6 ounces. Any “weight difference issue” is, well, NOT an issue.

And on and on ... EITHER antenna is a great investment. Most of the anti-Arrow nonsense on the ‘Net remind me of while my wife was proudly carrying her Nikon F in the 1970s (arguably the most significant SLR in 35mm history), others would comment, “Oh, my Pentax / Minolta / Canon is as good as that ... “ --- But you never heard any Nikon owner state any such comparison ... (grin)

How do the Elk and Arrow compare? Both work the FM birds very well. Either make working the FM sats feel like “cheating” - the gain is that dramatic over any HT whip improvements you might make.

But from someone who has purchased both and has used them both, the Arrow “senses” the initial capturing of a sat’s signal more definitively than the Elk does. I mean, in front of darned near every audience, I’ll declare, “There it is!” - when those close to me don’t hear anything of note. But that slight “dip” in the background noise ... no SWR meter can detect it ... you can just hear the beginning of capturing the signal better with the Arrow than with the Elk. This is NOT a scientific conclusion - just my personal observation after working the sats for several years with both antennas.

Wonderful products from Arrow, indeed.
 
KC9VVJ Rating: 5/5 Jul 15, 2012 17:42 Send this review to a friend
Fantastic working the Birds  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I got the split and duplexer, "full bore" model. Got a satellite the first time out and every time since (when they are transmitting). Easy setup, easy to hold, is not awkward to use at all. Got my first QSL of any kind (I've had my license a few months) with it on a satellite.

One of the best "out of the box" products of any kind I've ever purchased.
 
W4ZWA Rating: 5/5 May 25, 2012 07:21 Send this review to a friend
Works Great!  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I bought the antenna on a impulse buy to see if I liked "working the birds." The antenna was easy to put together and take apart if needed. I run my Wouxun HT through it and it hits the sats just fine. IMO it's worth the money,
 
M6TXP Rating: 5/5 Apr 1, 2012 15:59 Send this review to a friend
good dualband yagi  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
Bought one of these with the split boom and duplexer
to go with my yaesu ft60, to work the birds
unfortunately when it came i got hit with a £27 charge of uk customs and exise (mark box as gift arrow folks)
Nicely built and sturdy with good materials
Seems to work very well and got a station from belgium on ao27 on my second go with 5watts
Also it is a good antenna for pointing at repeaters that are normally out of range, plus it would make a good qrp sota antenna for the mountains/hills
Seems to work a little bit better on 2m than 70cm
All in all a good antenna and worthy of adding to your armoury of antennas
Would i buy another, only if arrow would get around the customs in the uk by marking gift on the box
73
paddy
 
KI4GTJ Rating: 5/5 Dec 14, 2011 16:49 Send this review to a friend
works like a champ  Time owned: more than 12 months
well i'm on my 2nd arrow antenna 2m/440 and I can say i got alot of great years out of the 1st one on my vx5 and ft-857d on SSB 2m now living in an apartment it help me with hitting some 2m and 440 reperter that I could hit all that will was able to make a qso on it now! Now will be taking it QRP with me next time I go and try out 2m ssb with it on the ft-817. I also have one of the arrow osj-144-440 j-pole's and it work like a champ too

PS my 1st one got broke in a move not b/c of bad parts or bad antenna
 
KD8OPI Rating: 5/5 Feb 25, 2011 10:57 Send this review to a friend
Fantastic, well worth the money.  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
I have the split-boom duplexer-included version. Very well made, assembles in 5-10 min. With this antenna and a Yaesu FT-60, I've worked AO-51, SO-50, the International Space Station, HO-68, SO-67.

Check the post time, but seconds ago I worked 6 stations on AO-27 on a not-so great pass of approx 40 deg max altitude, from my bedroom (yup from inside). Don't believe anyone who tells you this antenna is only good for passes >30 deg.

Also makes a great directional simplex antenna, which was put to good use when I activated Mt. Orizaba on Catalina Island for Summits On The Air 3 weeks ago.
 
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