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Reviews Categories | QRP Radios (5 watts or less) | Ramsey HRxx QRP Receiver Kits Help


Reviews Summary for Ramsey HRxx QRP Receiver Kits
Ramsey HRxx QRP Receiver Kits Reviews: 11 Average rating: 3.1/5 MSRP: $29.95
Description: These little receivers are based upon the hot Signetics
NE-602 that we read about almost every month in all of the
ham magazines and handbooks. The receivers are true
superheterodyne direct conversion - a simple design that
does not require the use of fancy IFs, RF filters, or exotic
mixers, in short, the ideal design for easy hobby building.
Only recently have high performance ICs become available
that enable such circuitry to be constructed. Beginners can
easily build these receivers. And, experienced amateurs and
QRP enthusiasts can use them as a reliable, economical,
basic foundation for modifications. Our single PC board has
plenty of room for lots of modifications and hook-ups,
tinker to your hearts content. Suggestions and technical
info are included in every receiver manual. Isn?t this what
ham radio is all about? Operates on 9 V battery (not
included). Optional case size: 5?w x 5 1/4?d x 1 1/2?h.
Product is in production.
More info: http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=HRXX
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NV0U Rating: 5/5 Mar 19, 2001 10:32 Send this review to a friend
The best use of $30 ever  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I picked up one of the HR40 kits a week ago and had it together in just a few hours. Anyone can build one of these kits - there are only a handful of parts and lots of room on the board, so even if you are as blind as a bat you can construct this thing with little problem - though you might need a magnifying glass to double check some of the part numbers.

My kit had problems however - no matter what I did to it I could not get the thing to tune below 9 MHz. I replaced caps, checked voltages - everything seemed fine - until about the 30th time of trying to replace a cap. It was at this time that the NE602 Mixer IC bit it. As soon as I replaced it with another NE602, everything was as it should be - tunes 40 M without a hitch! I should note here too that at this time I had put all the caps back to their original values, so the kit does work fine.

I am very impressed with the circuit board in this thing. It was more than capable of handling my soldering/desoldering parts over and over again. Two of the caps honestly did get soldered 30 times as I experimented with different value caps. The circuit board is still in perfect shape. The traces are still stuck to the board and are intact. This tells me this little circuit board is all ready to get modified if you want, and is going to be able to stand up to repeated modification "abuse".

One thing that bothered me at first was the receiver performance on 40. I could hear utility stations and international broadcasters with no problem into a random length of wire, but as soon as I hit the 40 meter band, it was like someone unplugged the antenna. Since I also bought the QRP transmitter kit that Ramsey sells, and I needed to really build a 40m dipole, I went ahead and built one. That made all the difference in the world. The receiver works just fine once you hook it up to a resonant antenna.

My only real gripe with the reciever is how sensitive it is to moving it around. Putting you hand anywhere near the VFO circuitry, even when it is in it's plastic case, causes the thing to move at least 5 kHz one way or another. It would really be nice to have a metal case, or perhaps some of that spray paint used for shielding on the inside of the case.

But hey, I spent $30 on this thing and it performs a lot better than I ever expected it to. I am very very impressed!
 
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