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Reviews Categories | Receivers: General Coverage | Sony World Band Receiver ICF-SW7600GR Help


Reviews Summary for Sony World Band Receiver ICF-SW7600GR
Sony World Band Receiver ICF-SW7600GR Reviews: 78 Average rating: 4.3/5 MSRP: $$180
Description: Portable shortwave receiver.
Product is in production.
More info: http://
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You can write your own review of the Sony World Band Receiver ICF-SW7600GR.

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W4WAL Rating: 5/5 Oct 31, 2011 18:43 Send this review to a friend
Darn Good  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I have been a owner of many great radios, 7030+, r390a restored, Icom r71, 746pro r75, probably others a dont recall. I found myself without any AM SW radio and did not want to spend much money. I considered some of the radios coming out of China. Then I came across this Sony radio. Good ratings, a bit more than I wanted to spend, but FM stereo and the clincher was the synchronous detection. It has been everything I expected. No tuning knob?, the scanning system is excellent. The Sync Detection is also excellent, fast and effective. Good sounding and its a Sony made in Japan. I recommend this radio at $140
 
M6RDP Rating: 5/5 Aug 26, 2011 10:51 Send this review to a friend
Superb little radio  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I don't think I have ever been so impressed with any of my radios over the past 30 years as I am with this little gem!

I have to admit I would not have bought it were it not for its synchronous detector as I consider it an essential feature for broadcast band listening. Fading I can cope with and my experience of sync detectors is that they can not eliminate this. But they can be very effective at reducing the effects of fading such as distortion - that all too familiar whooshing sound that distorts speech and particularly music and is very hard on the ears, not to mention the nerves. Even if I'm listening to a good, solid, single-hop, daytime-path signal a few deep fades will badly distort the sound and soon have me reaching for the off button.

The sync detectors on the AR7030 and Lowe HF150 were excellent but I didn't like either radio and eventually sold both. But I was worried that the sync on the considerably better-priced Sony SW7600GR would be less effective and not smooth out the distortion as I had hoped. But this is not the case at all and it is, in fact, highly effective. Folk music from Radio Romania, Spanish Classical music from REE, the whole hour of China Drive on CRI are all a total joy to listen to now without a hint of distortion.

Other things I love about this radio are its excellent build-quality. It's got all the hallmarks of quality I've come to associate with Sony. Its inclusion of FM for those moments I want to listen to Radio 3 for a change. And its keypad for direct frequency input, enabling me to jump freely and effortlessly around the bands.

Its speaker may be a little on the quiet side, and not as rich and bassy as my Sangean ATS803A or DX-394, but its inclusion of a sync detector far out way any negligible disadvantage here.

This radio has returned the joy to broadcast band listening and I am proud to own it.

 
W0VP Rating: 5/5 Jul 15, 2011 06:56 Send this review to a friend
A Shortwave Receiver With A History - I Like It  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
The ICF-SW7600GR is very likely the last of the great Sony shortwave receivers. And how can anyone possibly go wrong with a shortwave receiver that has been in production since 1977? Sure there will always be the occasional "klinker", but considering the Japanese's low tolerance for poor construction and world-class quality control, the chances of actually getting that klinker are pretty darn low.

Out of the box, I found the radio easy to use, not needing to even open the instruction manual until it was time to set the clock and save a frequency to one of the 1000 memory channels.

Audio through the speaker was better than I expected and terrific through a pair of headphones. CW and SSB reception is nearly as good as on my Icom 706. And synchronous detection works without a hitch, just as it does on my ICF-2010.

If I could change anything about the 7600GR, I would add a tuning knob, add illuminated controls for easier nighttime operation, and a (much) brighter LCD display. Other than that, I have no complaints.

The Sony ICF-7600GR has a great history and is still in production, at least in July of 2011. But who knows for how much longer. Grab one ASAP!

KC, W0VP

By the way, Stephan Grossklass has compiled a VERY comprehensive history of the Sony 7600 series, and it makes for very interesting reading for anyone who owns, or is considering the purchase of a Sony ICF-SW7600GR. You can find it at:

http://stephan.win31.de/sony7600.htm
 
NG9D Rating: 5/5 Jun 19, 2011 09:57 Send this review to a friend
SELECTABLE SIDEBAND  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
This little gem has selectable sideband reception LSB/USB which makes it a nice portable general coverage receiver for SSB/CW monitoring. Anyone who has tried both non-selectable DSB receivers with BFO and half-bandwidth selectable sideband radios like the Sony 7600GR knows how much interference is removed by filtering the unused sideband. That makes for more pleasant SSB/CW copy.

A bonus AM/shortwave BC listeners, the radio employs a switchable circuit that removes the carrier component of the signal to negate the affect of propagation path attenuation and inserts a steady carrier generated within the receiver. This has the effect of reducing distortion due to fading. Also, when this circuit is on, only one sideband is extracted for demodulation of the AM signal which lessens or eliminates adjacent signal beat note interference. The circuit is called sychonous detection and I was surprized at how well it worked. 73 de NG9D . .
 
SAILCAT Rating: 5/5 Mar 29, 2011 18:37 Send this review to a friend
Very Satisfied  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
I bought a Sony ICW-SW7600GR from Amazon a few months ago and I am very happy with my purchase. There are many portable radios on the market these days and this radio is among the best currently produced. FM reception is very good and this compact radio picks up many stations that are otherwise faint or beyond the reach of other, similarly equipped radios. AM sensitivity and selectivity are also quite good, so the 7600GR is capable of picking out faint stations without the interference of other nearby signals. SW and SSB reception are very good, as well. As compared to my Kaito KA1103 and Grundig YB 400PE, the Sony's reception is clearly superior on all bands, despite the strong performance of the Grundig and especially the Kaito. The audio quality of the little speaker on the Sony is not as good as those on the Kaito or the Grundig, however, but if you use earbuds or headphones the issue is moot. The controls and displays on the Sony are complicated and require careful study of the instructions to understand, but once you master them the controls are manageable. Battery life is acceptable, although I would recommend acquiring a set of rechargeable AA batteries for the Sony. Fit, finish, and construction quality of the 7600GR are excellent as one would expect from electronics produced in Japan, and this is a strong point that separates it from units assembled in China. My Kaito KA1103, for example, suffers from QC blemishes that aren't a problem with the Sony.

Overall, the Sony ICW-SW7600GR is a terrific portable radio that will provide you with many years of useful service. I give it two thumbs, way up!
 
ALPHABETAGAGA Rating: 5/5 Mar 14, 2011 04:44 Send this review to a friend
Best portable SW radio with superior 'Made in Japan' quality  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
First introduced to the market April 2001. 10 years on and still one of, if not the best portable SW radio available in the world today.

The best feature is the overall quality, bar none. These radios are still made in Japan today unlike other inferior made in China SW radios on the market. SW performance (using the whip) I find to be very good. SSB works well and the sync' detector is an excellent feature. Design and layout is excellent though the side switches for tone and sync/SSB might be too fiddly for some. The page memory system is convienient and easy to use.

Pros:
Build quality, durable, good sound quality, great reception, analog volume control, lightweight, long battery life

Cons:
LCD display might not be to everyones tastes

I would strongly advise anyone who is considering a portable to check out the SW7600GR. For the price and size, I have not found better.

Stuart
Hitchin, UK
 
SAILCAT Rating: 5/5 Feb 25, 2011 21:35 Send this review to a friend
Best Portable SW Radio  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
Rather than plow old ground I will confirm the Sony ICF-SW7600GR is a fine radio. I also have a Grundig YB 400PE and a Kaito/Degen 1103 and the Sony bests them in virtually all respects except audio quality. It is also quite solid and endures the rigors of travel well. I recommend it.
 
NX1F Rating: 5/5 Aug 23, 2010 16:36 Send this review to a friend
Fabulous Radio  Time owned: more than 12 months
I purchased and compared the Sony with the Grundig G3, the Grundig Satellit 750, and a TenTec Omni V. The Sony smokes the G3, and the SSB and SW is better than the 750. With just the whip antenna the Sony hears CW stations that the G3 doesn't hear with my outside antenna. I've got a plug into the bedroom from my Challenger Vertical. The vertical overloads the Grundigs on Medium Wave AM but not the Sony. When I fold up the whip on the Sony and plug in the outside antenna, FM comes in much stronger. It's not supposed to work on FM but it does. SSB is better and the noise floor is better on the Sony, about equal to the 750 but not as good as the Omni V. The sensitivity on 20 meter CW on the Sony was almost as good (just a hair less) as the Omni V. This is with the Challenger vertical. This was a real surprise. The Grundig G3 picks up noise and static when I move my hand on the radio, and even more noise when I turn on my bedroom lamp (new style bulb). This is not a problem on the Sony. Grundig is supposed to have great audio. It is fine on the 750 because that is a big radio with a bigger speaker, but the Sony sounds better than the Grundig G3. Overall I love the Sony with the exception of lack of tuning wheel. The G3 wheel isn't very good because it's very difficult to tune SW stations. It's on a hair trigger. There are numerous birdies and bleed-through of strong stations on the G3. None on the Sony. I would strongly advise anyone who is considering a portable to check out the SW7600GR. For the price and size, I have not found better.
Very 73
Joe Randazzo NX1F
South Burlington, Vermont
 
VE4AMN Rating: 5/5 Jun 16, 2010 13:48 Send this review to a friend
The best so far  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
I have owned the Grundig YB-400, G5, G6 and Kaito 1103, and this wins easily.

Pros
- good sensitivity
- synchronous detector
- good system for tuning SSB
- excellent battery life
- good fidelity (the YB-400 wins here)
- rf attenuator control

Cons
- no tuning knob
- selectivity switch and control.

I use this unit regularly and it has been excellent.
 
CARMEN Rating: 5/5 May 4, 2010 12:43 Send this review to a friend
trounces competition  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
A/Bing Sony ICF-SW7600GR & Degen de1103 on:

* coils 0-3mhz, both inductively coupled to internal loopsticks and with a coupling loop on the ANT port
* magloops 3-10 mhz, and 10-30 mhz KR1ST design
* random wires, roughly 20 meters long tied to trees outside

wideband overload

sony wins hands down. no sort of broadcast ‘leakage’ anywhere. on the 1103 it is everywhere Local or DX mode on wires, and DX on loops. additionally, even local mode is overloaded on a rooftop with whip retracted ALL the way, a few Km from a skyscraper with several FM stations on it, and about 5 miles from a variety of AM towers. its simply a wall of noise and cant even hear WWV (Sony 1, Degen -1)
clipping

the de1103 has no variable gain. the ‘local’ is too deaf to hear anything but the amp guys, the ‘dx’ mode guy causes the amp guys to be horribly clipped and warbly overdriven artifacts. sony has a variable gain knob, but really works fine anywhere except the bottom 20% where it will only hear strong stations (Sony 1, Degen -1)
signal

something is wrong with 1103 (mkIV) > 10 mhz. on both magloops and wires, i often simply hear nothing when tuning between 18.1 + 18.17, or 21.2 and 21.4. on the sony i’ll hear QSOs every 5 khz or so on the same bands with the same antennas and loop tunings. i always thought people just didnt use these bands! wow (Sony 1, Degen -1)
ssb

7600 has a real SSB detector. signal below zero-beat does not pass through at all. you can be on 3800, and guys chattering away at 3803 wont be heard at all which is awesome (some mild AGC pumping if theyre high power). the 1103 hears them as loud as what youre trying to listen to, at inverted pitch. (Sony 1, Degen -1)
selectivity

in SSB, 7600 seems to be about 3 khz wide. you may hear a slight high pitch of a QSO 3 khz above zerobeat. narrow mode on 1103 seems to just lowpass the AF a bit. thus you will hear 3 QSOs at once, on crowded ham bands due to the wide filter and inability to reject below zerobeat. unless band is uncrowded you will not find it comfortable for long (Sony 1, Degen -1)
ecss

unfortunately ECSS does not work on the 1103. carrier energy silences the much weaker audio. achieving a zerobeat is awfully hard with the tiny wheel as well. ive had superb ECSS using Quisk, pulling out all sorts of previously inaudible signals on SW broadcast freqs, due to the sony’s SSB properly exalting the carrier you can employ this technique when needed. (Sony 1, Degen -1)
sync

this is why everyone says to get the sony. im finding it pales in comparison to the general S/N n S/QRM reasons.
but sync helps with weak AMers. like Timtron operating from his car (ok, not so piss weak) (Sony 1, Degen 0)
tuning

sony lacks a tuning knob, however 1103 doesnt really have one either, just a rotary encoder that can send +-1 messages to the synthesizer. the sony can send +-1 and +-5 from the jog button bank. holding +-1 ‘slides’ the tuning with no chuffing, simply let go when you hear something. 1103 has mild digital chuffing sounds when spinning the knob. additionally the buttonbank is standard computer keyboard/phone orientation so you will be very fast on the sony, or hunting around on the degens awkward horizontal strip. 5KHz is a perfect stepsize for BCL but is not available on the Degen (Sony 1, Degen 0)
fm

using a homebrew yagi-uda to pick up low power caribbean stations from towns like dorchester and brockton, the 1103 is certainly passable. not as good as a 70s yamaha reciever but decency in a small package. sony does not hear anything on FM besides the horrible Clearchannel crap (Sony -1, Degen 1)
build

want to like degen, but my 1123 died within a few weeks, and had a serious manufacturing defect short that i had to fix. the faceplate fell off my 1103 after a few months , being attached with some cheap sticky tack like a magazine might affix a card with. otherwise feels like a brick and has fallen onto hardwood numerous times. sony faceplate hasnt fallen off, so it has the edge (Sony 1, Degen 0)

in summary, if you just want to hear Cuba or Sackville broadcasts, get a 10 dollar radio like the eton 300, it will hear them. if you want a decent radio for HF and dont want to spend more for a SDR or say R390A or waste money on a SONY 2010 that probably needs a round of electrolytics, modern sony cant be beaten by degen’s offering at the current time

Sony 8 Degen -5
 
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