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Reviews Categories | Transceivers: HF Amateur HF+6M+VHF+UHF models - not QRP <5W | Yaesu FT-897 & 897D Help


Reviews Summary for Yaesu FT-897 & 897D
Yaesu FT-897 & 897D Reviews: 377 Average rating: 4.6/5 MSRP: $1049.95
Description: It is the world's first multi-mode high-power base/mobile transceiver designed to fitted with internal batteries (optional) for portable use. The coverage is HF 160 to 10 meters plus 50/144/430 MHz VHF/UHF. Receive is 0.1-56, 76-108, 118-164 and 420-470 MHz. 7.9x3.2x10.3 inches (200x80x263 mm).
Product is in production.
More info: http://www.yaesu.com/amateur/ft897.html
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G4REK Rating: 5/5 Nov 20, 2004 11:45 Send this review to a friend
smiling face  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
Extremely pleased with my new ft 897d radio,
Works a treat, nice audio, even without any add on filters it stands up well on the crazy 40 and 80 meter bands at the weekend, dsp is in my opinion as good if not better than my 706 mk2 g. sooner play with this radio than the girlfriend or the ft 847.
 
KE4IZA Rating: 5/5 Nov 16, 2004 16:59 Send this review to a friend
YAESU HAS DONE IT AGAIN  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
This is simply the best HF rig I have owned. The controls are designed to be easy to use. The menus took me a few hours of playing to master. Every control is easily accessable, including menu options. The receiver is really nice. So far if I can hear them, they have heard me. The DSP is really useful to cut noise. Display is adjustable to large or small characters and many colors make it easy on the eyes. 2m is clear and strong. I disagree with some reviews which have classified the FT-897 as a beginners rig. This radio is a great all round HF rig and the 2m/440 make it even better.
 
M3SKF Rating: 5/5 Oct 15, 2004 12:58 Send this review to a friend
pump up the jam  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
Obtained recently from a local radio rally the radio works fine.Used mainly from the mobile the unit gives a good account of it-self on hf-vhf & uhf whips.From the base station beam & wire some over-load & pager break-trough 0n vhf & hf has been noted.Very pleased so far solid kit at a very good price in the uk.
 
VA3CGT Rating: 4/5 Aug 14, 2004 12:44 Send this review to a friend
I like the radio BUT...  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I have had this radio for about two weeks now and have had to return it to the dealer. On "receive" in the VHF band I get what sounds like feedback while listening to a strong signal. It almost sounds like receiver overload...with a slight echo. The feedback is intermittent. Any comments on this would be appreciated

Other then that little problem I'm happy with the radio.

Chris
VA3CGT

 
KA0OZE Rating: 5/5 Aug 3, 2004 23:34 Send this review to a friend
Awesome all in one radio  Time owned: more than 12 months
I have the yaesu FT-897. I recommend getting the power supply that goes with it. Makes it very easy to go from one location to another. While not the Mark V it does very well. I use this as my 6 meter radio and i take it home to the Twin Cities, where my mother has an appartment. I like the portability. Also like the 200 memories and ability to group them. All in all it is very good radio. It adds fun to my Mark V which I also own. Both radios are keepers.
 
VK2HBL Rating: 5/5 Aug 3, 2004 09:37 Send this review to a friend
FT-897 EXCELLENT  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
Well I have to say Yaesu has produced an excellent radio. The FT-897 is a good beginnerís type radio that performs excellent on all bands I have used it on. I use this radio as my main base radio and have had excellent reports from all stations, in particular on HF. I also use this radio on 2 M and 70 CM bands. The Antennaís I use on this radio is a G5RV for 80M, a converted 11 M 5/8th for 10 M and a duel band x30 Diamond base for 2/70. I use a manual tuner (loaned) for 80 Metres.

I have found FTBASIC software to work well, also HAM RADIO DELUX software performs excellent with the FT-897.

Once you sort out the manual, which is ok the radio is easy to use and configure to ones personal settings. I use either FTBASIC or HAM RADIO DELUX to control the radio.

I would highly recommend this radio for anybody that requires a radio that has features in it that matches some of the more expensive radios

 
KI4ECW Rating: 5/5 Jul 31, 2004 23:07 Send this review to a friend
Buy One Today!!!  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
I've bought my first Yaesu 897D about six months ago. I liked it so much I bought another one two months ago to run mobile.

Most hams would probably prefer the smaller Yaesu 857D for mobile because the 897D is fairly large for a dashboard or console mount. Give me the big knobs and large, well lit LCD display of the 897D.

On the 897D base unit I use and FC-30 tuner and the FP-30 internal power supply. The tuner works great on my HF verticals and the tri-band beams. It won't tune the GR5V (i.e., long wire antenna).

The internal power supply works fine; however, an external power supply would probably have worked just as well and would have been cheaper.

I added the optional 2.3 kHz SSB filter and 500 Hz CW filters. I can't tell much difference with the SSB filter but the CW filter is a MUST for any CW enthusiast. It really makes a difference.

The 897D has good, loud, strong audio both as a base and a mobile.

I use the MH-31 hand mic on both the base and mobile and get excellent audio reports. In fact, I have to keep the mic gain set at about 1/3 of max or get told to "turn that mic down!"

I recently added the Yaesu MD-100 desk mic for the base but can't tell much difference. Unless you want the looks or the convenience, save your money and use the hand mic -- not much operational difference.

If you are experienced with Yaesu's menu driven transceivers you'll find the 897D a snap to use. If not, you'll spend a lot of time in the manual and probably pull out a few handfuls of hair until you get used to the Yaesu-style programming.

It took me a couple of weeks and a lot of frustration until I got the hang of it. Even though it was a slow learning curve, now I wouldn't use anything but menu driven transceivers.

The local ham club used one of the 897D's for Field day and it performed flawlessly on all the HF bands. The 897D was getting pulled out of the pile-ups when the other transceivers weren't.

Kenwood and ICOM owners were virtually standing in line to get a crack at the 897D. All comments were positive and a couple of hams even tried to buy it from me!

The 897D is fine on 6 meters with 100 watts output and 2 meters with 50 watts RF output. It's not much on 70 cm due to the low RF output --only 20 watts.

The 897Ds have performed flawlessly both electrically and mechanically for the time I've owned them.

If you're looking for a great HF, VHF, and UHF all mode rig -- this one's for you!

 
K6SBA Rating: 5/5 Jul 30, 2004 16:12 Send this review to a friend
A Great Rig but make sure it is right for you  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
This review is of the "D" version. This radio is really a "4" for me, but I think if it is the right radio for you, it is worth a "5".

I was looking for a more powerful replacement for my great '817, but I'm not sure the 897 fits the bill. It is a relatively large and heavy radio, especially with the NiMH batteries installed. Do not think you are going to backpack with this rig, unless you take a pack animal along! This radio would be better seen as a vacation radio that you might take in a vehicle with you. It would also be perfect for the RV'er who could run it off vehicle batteries, but would like to take it outside on a picnic table once in awhile.

You will also need a tuner, unless you are using resonant antennas, which is not always the cause for portable operations. I use an LDG Z-100 with mine and it tunes great, but it is yet another external accessory that adds to the bulk and weight.

If you have used any recent menu-driven Yaesu radio, the 897D is a snap to use. The DSP and bandpass filtering are excellent. I get great audio reports with the standard MH-31 hand mic.

One little menu trick I just realized: All of the 70+ menu items are in alphabetical order. This makes it much easier move around and quickly find the menu item you wish to change.

So all in all, I am pleased with this radio, but I wish Yaesu would offer a 20-40 watt version with an internal tuner in a smaller package. Hmmm...sounds like my Elecraft K2 (OK only 15 watts) but you've got to build that one!

73 de K6SBA
David in Santa Barbara, CA
 
KC4IUP Rating: 5/5 Jul 17, 2004 10:38 Send this review to a friend
Great radio!  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
What can I say about the Yaesu FT-897D? This radio is great! I wanted a radio that is fairly small and portable (but not too small), rugged, dependable, has a lot of features that I can really use, and doesn't cost too much. I must say this radio meets all my requirements. It reminds me of my old FT-757GXII, one of Yaesu's other very portable workhorses from years past although the FT-897D adds a lot by comparison. The FT-897D case is metal, feels very rugged, and has a very nice spring-loaded carry handle (which says "take me with you!"). The front panel gives you access to the settings you change most often with the ability to program the hot keys with other settings of your choice. The audio is well balanced from a tonal perspective (not tinny like some radios), and can get quite loud using the internal speaker. The display is a good size, and is very sharp and easy to read.

I also purchased the FC-30 antenna tuner. The FC-30 works well with antennas that are not too far off for the band on which you're operating. And it is fast. Other tuners may be more lenient on the antennas they tune for various bands, but you cannot beat the FC-30 for its increadibly small size, ability to bolt onto the radio (portability!), and its matching the radio in appearance (much nicer looking than the LDG tuner built for this radio).

I also purchased the FP-30 power supply. It works well, and prevents me from having to transport a separate power supply or requiring another section of real estate on the desk.

I used the above configuration -- except with a battery -- at this year's Field Day. My brother and I hoisted a G5RV antenna into the trees and went to work. The radio and tuner performed quite well. Using the clarifier and DSP filters, I was able to pull contacts out of the pileups and background noise, and work everyone I could hear! I worked many contacts on 80m, 40m, 20m, and 10m.

There were some very narrow spots on some of the bands that the FC-30 would not tune using the G5RV. This may have been due to the fact that we could not get the G5RV up as high in the air as it is required to be installed. In the event this were to happen, I had brought along another tuner, the new MFJ-993, which I set up as an alternate and used when the FC-30 had troubles. This much larger tuner worked quickly and flawlessly everywhere on each band.

Lastly, I want to say that I considered purchasing the Icom-706 instead of the FT-897D. Both radios are excellent. But what tipped the scales for me in favor of the FT-897D was Yaesu's overall greater record of build quality, I had owned a Yaesu before that only had a meter light bulb go out in it after years of service, I preferred the look and feel of the Yaesu's rugged exterior and larger knobs (especially the heavily-weighted tuning dial), and the radio could contain/attach its own power supply/batteries/tuner. I also briefly considered the FT-857D as it is the same as the FT-897D but in a mobile version. However, I could not get used to the FT-857D's panel layout and buttons being placed around the tuning knob.

In summary, I highly recommend the FT-897D and FP-30 power supply (which I use at home). I also recommend the FC-30 antenna tuner for portability to fine tune antennas made for the bands on which you have chosen to operate. I also highly recommend the MFJ-993 tuner if you want an overall, great, automatic antenna tuner. The MFJ-993 is about the size of the FT-897D and looks good with the FT-897D sitting on top of it.
 
AE7Q Rating: 5/5 Jul 6, 2004 17:33 Send this review to a friend
Excellent  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I bought this radio two months ago because it's the only non-QRP rig that can be powered by internal batteries. After reading the reviews here, I waited to write a review to see if there were any surprises. I've now used most of the modes, and am VERY pleased with the radio. It has all the features most amateurs would ever need (but see below on documentation and usability). The DSP bandpass filter (DBF) is EXCELLENT, and obviates the need for a separate SSB or CW mechanical filter (which I tried briefly), in my opinion.

Nitpicks:

1. The manual assumes that you are an experienced HF operator who is also experienced with modern HF radio features. If you are not, you will have find other sources of information about HOW to effectively use the radio's features to best advantage. Yaesu should create a "User's Guide" (a PDF file would be fine) that explains how to use the features of their radios for effective operation. I think such a guide could be used to enhance sales.

2. The "Clarifier/IF shift" knob does NOTHING by default; you have to enable (with a separate button) the clarifier or IF shift mode(s) to use the knob. The problem with this is that the "MEM/VFO" knob can be programmed to perform alternate tasks when you press it in; these tasks (like setting the power level) would be better performed by the default mode of the "Clarifier/IF shift" knob. And the separate button could have been eliminated by allowing the "Clarifier/IF shift" knob to be pressed, like you can with the "MEM/VFO" knob.

3. Further, when you program the alternate function of the "MEM/VFO" knob to control (say) the power level, when you then press the kob to control the power level, there is NO indication that anything is happening, let alone a display of the power level Instead, I programmed the "PG B" menu button to put the menu directly into the power level adjustment mode.

4. The band and mode up/down button pairs would have been better implemented as small knobs, in my opinion.

5. Many of the radio's functions use the two "menu" systems. Entering and exiting the second "menu" mode requires holding a "F" (function) key for one second. After you get used to frequently using the second menu mode, that one second delay is annoying; a separate button would have been better.

6. Tuning across a band is slow if you've set the main and VFO dials for fine resolution, so I bought the optional remote microphone (MH-59), which can be used to key in a frequency directly and quickly, and the microphone caon control virtually all of the radio's main panel settings (including audio volume and power on/off).

7. I connect the radio in my house to a Alpha-Delta DX-EE (40/20/15/10m) antenna in the attic, and with an external tuner (MFJ-902) am able to tune 60-10m to a 1:1 SWR. For portable operation, I also bought the Yaesu ATAS-120. While a good antenna, the radio's user control of the ATAS-120 could be better: pushing either of the up/down buttons withOUT keying the transmitter should drive the antenna up or down (eg, to retract the antenna to minimum length for transportation or to clear a garage door). Also, if the radio doesn't know the length of the antenna, it drives the antenna down for 60 seconds to guarantee it is fully down, before commencing tuning. It would be nice if pressing the up or down buttons in this and similar cases, would tell the radio to start tuning in that direction.

8. With two batteries installed, and both batteries fully charged, and operating off of external power, the battery that is selected shows an orange LED (implying a charge is needed) rather than green (which means fully charged). Further, there is no direct indication that you are running off of external power (other than the displayed voltage).

9. The radio allows you to set the color of the display so that the color changes with mode (or band, or ARTS, etc) changes. Nice, except that the selections of color-to-mode are limited. There should be an easy way of making the colors fully selectable per mode.

10. You can attach a label to each memory frequency, but you can't display both the label and frequency at the same time (Yaesu should copy what this feature from its VX-5R).

11. The grounding screw should be wingnut-based. Replacing the screw with a wingnut can't be done without drilling a new hole, because the grounding screw hole is too close to the CAT port connection.

12. I mounted the microphone clip under the front carrying handle mount. While this works reasonably well, a slight manufacturing change to the handle mount would be would enable the microphone clip to be held more securely (you can see I'm getting very nitpicky at this point!).

13. Although the radio supports 60m operation, the only way I could find to tune my antenna for this band was to use PSK31 software to generate an SSB tone, since the radio doesn't support any other way of generating a carrier for that band!!!

My suggestions:

1. Get the ATAS-120 if you want portable/mobile operation.

2. Get the MH-59 microphone.

3. Don't get the FP-30 AC power supply; an external power supply is cheaper and more flexible (can be used to power the CD-24 charger without getting the PA-26).

4. Don't get the FC-30 tuner (among other reasons, it consumes the CAT/tuner connector).

5. Get the free "Ham Radio Deluxe" software package, which gives you very nice PC control of the radio. This package also includes "PSK31 Deluxe", the best PSK31 package out there, in my opinion.

6. For PSK31 work, get Yaesu's CT-39A packet cable ($10) and wire it up to interface to West Mountain Radio's "RigBlaster" (the "NoMic" version - $59), as described on West Mountain Radio's web pages.

Presently there is no PC software available for saving/restoring the radio's memories, but software for this is presently in beta test from RT Systems, and should be available soon.

 
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