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Reviews Categories | Receivers: General Coverage | Grundig S350 AM/FM/SW World Receiver Help


Reviews Summary for Grundig S350 AM/FM/SW World Receiver
Grundig S350 AM/FM/SW World Receiver Reviews: 73 Average rating: 3.8/5 MSRP: $100.00
Description: Continuous coverage from 2.3 to 27.41 mHz shortwave; medium wave band; FM band
Product is in production.
More info: http://www.grundigradio.com/asp/Product.asp?productname=s350&function=overview
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SSBSWLFAN Rating: 3/5 Sep 7, 2009 23:04 Send this review to a friend
Decent starter receiver  Time owned: more than 12 months
This receiver is how I got my feet wet into shortwave. I have the older s3-"drifty"(not the DLS model), but it still is valuable despite the drifting.

Obviously, the longer the set is on the less drifting occurs.

Love the layout of the radio and especially enjoy the main inner/outer knob.

The reception for FM is phenomenal on my unit. I can easily pull in stations 30-40 miles away.

As others have noted, images are all over the shortwave dial even as much as 1 mhz with mine. However, this thing can receive the BC stations about as well as my Realistic DX-302.

The timer function is really easy to use for me. That's probably why I still have the radio. I know, sad but true.

No SSB on this radio, but you can still hear the distorted voices of hams down on 80 meters. It makes you want a radio that does have SSB for sure.

AM reception is decent. It rivals the reception I have on my CD player. I can get 1180 from Rochester, NY from here in Michigan as well as 1100 from Cleveland, the Score from Chicago(1000), and 1530 from Cincy. Good, but I am sure a CCrane Radio will better suit AM DX'ers for sure.


My S350 has recently suffered some mechanical problems recently though. The narrow to wide switch for the filters sticks quite a bit. It can cause the sound to be very low which makes me fiddle with the knob. The good thing is I can get it back to normal after flicking it around 4 times. The SW1/SW2 switches stick as well but not as bad as the filter switch.

One day unfortunately I did knock the receiver off my desk, and it caused the plastic to be jarred off the face display. I slid this back into place, and it's fine for now.

Test your switches if you buy one used in person.



 
W2UIS Rating: 5/5 Aug 31, 2009 17:01 Send this review to a friend
Update  Time owned: more than 12 months
I added the Grundig AN 200 tunable loop antenna for BCB DX. I was impressed with the results.
 
N4NYY Rating: 5/5 Aug 29, 2009 20:52 Send this review to a friend
S350DL - Superb AM DXer for the money  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
OK. The year is 2003. I moved to South Jersey about 120 miles from NYC. I am a Yankees fan, and now cannot pickup the radio station. So I do a search and found several long distance AM radios.

I order what appears to be the cream of the crop, the CCradio plus. After a few days, I deem it a disaster. AM reception was horrible. I returned it for a full refund.

I then order an GE Superadio III. It has superior AM reception to the CCradio. Drifts more, but I can pick up the station. Works well for several years.

Fast forward to 2009. The GE radio is not a nightmare for the last 2 years. It drifts repeatedly, and needs constant turning of the tuner. Enough is enough.

I end up trying the Grundig S350DL. This is supposed to be an improvement over the S350. I have enough credit card points, so that the radio is free. Upon trying it, reception is clearly superior to the GE Superadio. I had them side by side, and it was no comparison. The Grundig receiver was far more sensative and selective.

After a Google, I then decided to install the Kiwa filters and audio upgrade. I installed them on my own, with the parts costing $60. So now, I have a Grundig S350DL with Kiwa filters and audio upgrade for a total cost of $60.

The new filters were superior. The original stock filters were useless. I installed the audio upgrade because I'd figure for an extra $15, it can't hurt. The radio was already apart and it would only take about 1 hour more.

The audio is superb. Problem was that I did not have it long enough to know if it was an improvement. But it sounds great with the audio upgrade.

Regarding performance, you cannot beat it for the price. The frequency lock feature works great. It very occasionally drifts, but you can tell and reset the tuner. But it was so infrequent. Reception on AM was superb, even with no signal bars. It gets even better with 1 or 2 bars. I only tried it on a few SW channels, and it was flawless. I do not use it for FM.

If I have one complaint, it's that the fine adjust knob on the tuner is too course. You can simply get away with the course dial.

I could not believe some of the negative reviews for this radio. Maybe it's because they are for the old version S350. This is the DL (deluxe). Too many people were a bit harsh. I think they were expecting top end receiver, and they forgot that it is a $100 radio. You are not going to get several thousand dollars worth of performance, from a $100 radio. So don't expect it. For for the cost, it blows away the GE and CCradio.
 
NAVYVET Rating: 5/5 Aug 1, 2009 18:24 Send this review to a friend
REVIEW of the New GS350DL  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
August 1, 2009

This latest multi-purpose radio, the Eton S350DL aka Grundig GS350DL, is my 3rd in the series beginning with the Tecsun BCL 2000, BCL 3000 and now this newest version.

Right out of the box, the S350DL grabs your eye, as it's a full 2 inches wider than its predecessors. Now spanning 12.5", more room was made for the larger speaker and a second battery compartment.

The 350's great sound has improved even more with the larger speaker and that long, long battery life continues to amaze.

Here are the main upgrades I've noticed when compared to previous models:

1. A physically larger and still very handsome case, including that functional shoulder/hand carry strap combo.

2. Larger grill plate covering the bigger 4.25" Speaker.

3. FM Stereo now available thru both the earphones and Line-Out jacks.

4. Four "D" cells are the main power supply, but you can now insert 4 AA's as a back-up. A clever "trap door" separates the two compartments and a slide switch lets you instantly select which batteries you wish to use.

5. Combined with that wider case, a longer FM/SW antennae was added...now measuring 44". A "Squeegee" type gasket was fitted to the top of the bottom most antennae segment that "wipes" the next incoming rod clean before insertion...a nice touch!

6. Can't remember if present on the other models, but the dial light automatically comes on when rotating the dial and stays illuminated for 8 seconds after you've stopped...great!

7. The icons in the LED display now seem larger, i.e. the battery level and signal strength meters.

As with the Tecsun 3000 and Grundig S350, both have auto-frequency lock to prevent drifting and the S350DL continues that feature.

While station drifting is less of a problem with this new model, it still occurs. As other reviewers have noted, ambient temperatures seems to be the main cause of drifting.

When using radio in my air conditioned Florida office and locked on to 1240 AM, I noticed zero drift. Taking the radio outside with afternoon temps above 90 degrees, the S350DL drifted up to 1244 KHz. So temperature certainly does play a roll in the drifting factor. However, once you re-tune to the drifted frequency, it plays perfectly as before.

Overall quality and feel...
Excellent, except for the two switch knobs located under the Power/Sleep button...they still seem wobbly on their shafts, but I've never had one break. So, I think its a perception they are weak and subject to failure, when in fact they hold together over time regardless.

The 4 smaller round knobs, plus large two-speed tuning knobs feel more solid and work well.

Three things I'd like to see improved and added for the next generation S350DL.
1. Less wobbly control shafts
2. All metal knobs
3. An On/Off remote control for the speaker

For what it's designed to do...be as near perfect of an all-around general purpose low priced AM/FM/SW radio, now made even better with some pretty significant upgrades...the S350DL is still selling in the old $80 to $100 price range. I paid $100, with free UPS shipping and a US warranty covered by Eton.

In summary...
For the money, purpose and limitations...the Eton S350DL or its Grundig sister, the GS350DL...can't be beat. The fact this radio is still around after 7+ years, while on-going improvements were made and up to the present, speaks well about its original design and Eton's commitment to continued product development and customer support.

Happy Listening from,
NavyVet
Naval Air Station, Glenview, (now closed)

PS. I chose the Red colored case for my S350DL and some retailers are offering it for $20 less than the more common Black or Silver versions. A Google search will help you find those sellers.
 
TERRYW Rating: 4/5 Jul 17, 2009 16:57 Send this review to a friend
Good Analog Radio. I'm quite surprised.  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
Yes, I bought another Eton product, after swearing never to do so again. This time I'm quite pleased with the purchase.

The S350DL is an analog radio with a digital display. There is no numeric keypad. There are no memories. There is no SSB. There is no Synchronous Detection. There is no autoscan. There is no RDS. If you want those, try an E1 or any digital radio with whichever of those features you desire.

What the 350 does offer is FM (stereo thru headphones,) MW and continuous SW (broken into three segments) tuned via two analog knobs on the face of the radio, one for course tuning the other for fine, mounted concentrically. I had no ergonomic issues tuning the radio.

It is a little finicky to land on the frequency you want. You have to turn the fine tuning dial VERY SLOWLY when manually scanning thru a broadcast band. And when you stop turning, the radio will lock onto the signal, which might change the frequency reading by a few kHz. This is mildly annoying, though the lock on is designed to prevent drift. The non-DL original S350 was known colloquially as the S-Three Drifty. I have noticed no drift whatsoever on the DL. I believe the Sample To Sample Variance on Eton radios to be very poor, so while there is no drift on my particular radio, I can't guarantee that will be the case with yours.

My 350 is very hot as well. Very sensitive. It can hear everything my Grundig G5 can, and the G5 is as sensitive as my Eton E1 and my Ten-Tec RX-320D. All of these radios leave my Radio Shack DX-398 fumbling for its hearing aid. I was very impressed with all I could pick up on the 350 during the middle of the afternoon, typically a very bad time of day for DXing and SWLing in general. Most impressive.

Furthermore, the selectivity is very good. Using the narrow filter, I had no trouble escaping from adjacent channel interference. The wide filter is too wide for most SW listening, unless it is a strong station in the clear. The wide filter is very good for MW and FM. The 350 has a Low Pass Filter to reduce background noise when listening to SW. I found this filter to work extremely well in the 31 meter band. The background roar would drop away and the station would rise out of the hash. That's great. It didn't do much in some of the other bands I tried, but knowing it works very well in some instances is a great option to have.

The speaker is very very nice and room filling. My G5 sounds like a tin can in comparison, and I like the speaker sound on the G5. My E1 sounds like a box of cotton balls by comparison. I do not like the sound of the E1. There are separate Bass and Treble controls on the 350. They both work well, but there is no bass per se - the 350 has a midrange speaker and no woofer. The Bass control should be renamed Midrange. But nice sound, anyway. Loud and clear. The fading distortion peaks don't sound bad at all.

The 350 also has an RF Gain knob. Like the DX-398, this knob doesn't zero. But it does attenuate the signal, which is all it needs to do. I haven't experienced any signals overloading yet, though if I do, I have an option for dealing with them.

SW on the 350 has lots of imaging problems. Every signal has a strong image 900 kHz below it. I haven't run into a signal colliding with an image, though if that happened I guess I could look for the image of the signal being interfered with. This does present a problem with knowing what frequency a station is on. If you don't know already, you'll have to go searching for the image to make sure. Unfortunate, but a problem in cheaper radios. My G6 has image problems as well. My E1 does not.

The frequency readout is exact. Every frequency the 350 claimed to be on was verified by my G5. Nice to know the 350 knows what it's talking about.

The whip antenna is beefy and long. Oh baby! Works well for sucking in signals. The 350 has bare wire plugs for an external antenna. That's quite retro. I made an adapter for my external 75' multi-element and had no trouble using it with the 350.

The MW is quite good. I got all the stations I'm accustomed to. I'm not a MW DXer, so I can't speak to the specific strengths or weaknesses of the 350 on that.

FM was a mess. Ghosting all over the place from an offensive local FM station, but I have the same problem with my other radios. With the 350's whip fully extended, I could hear that FM station while listening to SW. I had to collapse the whip in order to escape it. My external has a 9:1 balun, so I did not notice any FM ghosting when using it.

The 350 is about the same size as the E1. No dinky radio. The 350 has a nice carrying strap. It does not have a stand, which is unfortunate. The A/C adapter plugs into the back of the radio, as does the external antenna, instead of the side. This is stupid. I'd like to lean the radio back, but I can't. Also, the LCD is hard to see at most angles. Leave it to Eton to screw up yet another display, but it's not as bad as that crap display on the E1, the one which actually generates RF noise and gives you a high noise floor for all your SW listening.

All in all, quite a nice package. It's an all-plastic radio, despite trying to emulate the look of good old metal. My Ten-Tec has a metal case, which is enough reason for anyone to buy more Ten-Tec products. I've had superior sound, sensitivity and selectivity with the 350, and all the fun one is supposed to have with an analog radio. Anyone who likes analog should find something they like here, unless they absolutely cannot abide plastic or radios made after 1980. If you buy a 350, hopefully you get a good sample like I did.
 
N5IVZ Rating: 3/5 Jun 18, 2009 05:03 Send this review to a friend
Good for Local AM  Time owned: more than 12 months
I have owned it for several years... ok audio but the drift is annoying...

good for the bedside at night listening to George Norry and Coast to Coast...

Not a DX radio!
 
N3NXD Rating: 5/5 Apr 10, 2009 17:01 Send this review to a friend
The perfect bedside radio  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I exchanged my A6 Aviator for this. The reception of this unit is superb. No reception of house electronics at bedside. Lot's of filtering, if needed. Not hypersensitive like the aviator. No drift, the wobbly tuning knob is made for finger spinning, not an issue. No SSB. I have a MFJ-8100 for SSB. A classic you won't regret. Plain rugged,yet sexy.
 
OLLIEOXEN27 Rating: 4/5 Mar 17, 2009 14:17 Send this review to a friend
Poor performer made acceptable  Time owned: more than 12 months
I bought the S350 about five years ago but put it on the shelf due to the unacceptable audio - squeals, howels, hisses, you name it.

Recently I got it down and worked out a solution. First thing I did was connect the radio to an outside antenna. I now run the radio with RF gain at just above minimum. I use the narrow filter in the radio and off tune by a couple of khz which helps. Then I built an el cheapo external variable low pass filter by running the audio in series with a 5k potentiometer and a .1uf capacitor in parallel. This setup removes about 95% of the squeals and high pitch headache makers that made using the radio so fatiging before.

Now I listen to the radio often and I am pleased with it's performance. It's no 7030 but it's worth what I paid.
 
VK3DWZ Rating: 3/5 Mar 4, 2009 03:07 Send this review to a friend
Good bedside radio.  Time owned: more than 12 months
After seeing this radio reviewed in "Passport to Worldband Radio" (2004 edition), I decided to purchase one. A surprise trip to Beijing had me searching for it there where (in China) it was called "Tecsun BCL-2000".

How does it perform? No great DX receiver, but more than adequate for casual listening. The sensitivity is good everywhere -- importantat this QTH where signals are often very marginal. Very good audio, too.

Yes, its flaws are real: overloads easily; lousy tuning; "useless" R-F gain control; "woeful" single conversion has phantom signals everywhere; very drifty, but as a casual short-wave receiver it's pretty good.

 
M1MBZ Rating: 2/5 Oct 21, 2007 10:29 Send this review to a friend
Big radio but performs like a cheap toy.  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I've played with one and have a review.

The first thing about this radio is it's size, it's not a compact portable receiver, this one is huge!

The first thing wrong with this receiver is it's mode switch, it's not clear at first that there is one switch to switch between FM (afc on) and FM (afc off) and AM, there is then another switch to switch between the MF am band and three shortwave selections, this could all be done with one switch, and the AFC function should be done with a separate button.

Volume and tone controls are straight forward.

Why is there a shortwave low pass filter option? It kills reception of the top half of shortwave, I can only imagine it's there to save the owners of the radio from problems with local 27MHz operators.

Audio is loud but not particularly clear, the tone control does not really help bring any clarity to the audio, the IF wide option being too wide to be practical, so you have to use the narrow filter to make the radio useful at all.

Tuning on any of the shortwave bands needs a steady hand as a twitch of the tune knob will send the receiver 20kHz away from your wanted station, this is an analogue tuner with a digital frequency readout, there is no dial lock or frequency lock, also no memory functions, like I said, this is a plain old analogue radio with a digital read out.

The receiver has external antenna sockets, but there is no way to disengage the built in whip or AM bar antenna. Thankfully there is an RF gain control, although that seems to reach it's peak gain when the knob is only turned 1/4 of the way, turning it the rest of the way does nothing.

This thing takes 4 x D cells, big batteries for a big radio, some might call this a field radio, although it's not really practical in the field. I can think of a number of simpler, smaller, cheaper radios that work, that would be better in the 'field' than this one.

 
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