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Reviews Categories | Receivers: Scanners | Regency M-100 Help


Reviews Summary for Regency M-100
Reviews: 1 Average rating: 3.0/5 MSRP: $(missing—add MSRP)
Description: 10 Channel 1980's Mobile Scanner
Product is in production.
More info: http://
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WB6NVH Rating: 3/5 Mar 25, 2004 22:11 Send this review to a friend
Great for the price  Time owned: more than 12 months
The Regency M-100 is a mobile scanner which can be run from AC via any 12 volt DC wall-wart adapter capable of supplying about 600 ma. They were used by a number of state highway patrol and sheriff's departments and are now common on the surplus market at prices from $ 10-20. They have a vacuum fluorescent display and are programmable from the front keypad. The volume and squelch pots are the weak spot in these, along with flimsy knobs. Don't pay much for one with bad or damaged pots. The knobs are frequently broken or missing but as of recently, Uniden (Regency's successor)still had them in stock. The best part of the M-100 is that you can add a jumper and unlock the firmware to allow programming of channels outside the regular range, e.g. 29-30, 140-144, and 406-440 MHz. Retuning of the VCO is usually required to assure lock on the range you are interested in. A detailed procedure is found on my website (search Google under "Regency M-100.) A small annoyance is that the driver for the vacuum fluorescent display is prone to RFI on some frequencies. I am working on a fix for that. Do not listen to nerds who will tell you that you can scan out-of-firmware-range frequencies by simply using some magic number entry procedure such as the decimal point first. Do the conversion right and leave the screwed up radios to them.
 


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