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Reviews Categories | Receivers: General Coverage | Sangean PT80 with SSB Help


Reviews Summary for Sangean PT80 with SSB
Sangean PT80 with SSB Reviews: 3 Average rating: 3.7/5 MSRP: $219.50
Description: The Sangean PT-80 ProTravel is a compact digital radio featuring longwave, AM, FM plus continuous shortwave coverage. The PT-80 employs a dual conversion PLL synthesized circuit yielding excellent sensitivity and image rejection. It offers five tuning methods: direct keypad frequency entry, autoscan, manual tuning, memory recall and rotary knob tuning. 45 memory presets are available with ATS Auto Tune System. A dial lock is featured. There is an indicator on the LCD that tells you whether our not you are tuning a shortwave broadcast band or not. Single sideband (SSB) shortwave reception is supported. An SSB fine tuning control on the right side panel allows for accurate SSB clarification. The left side of the radio has switches for Stereo-Mono and for Local-DX. A dual world time clock (12/24 hour) with alarm, snooze and sleep is featured. The LCD is backlit and there is an external antenna jack for the shortwave band. There is even a way to program five operation preferences (such as time display format, AM channel spacing, etc.).

The PT-80 includes: 120 VAC wall adapter, earphones, ANT-60 wind-up antenna and butter-soft hand crafted leather pouch.
Product is in production.
More info: http://
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PROCOPIO Rating: 4/5 Jul 29, 2014 14:56 Send this review to a friend
Itīs a practical receiver.  Time owned: more than 12 months
I bought a Sony ICF-SW7600GR in deparment store, I liked it but I notice the el electrical jack isn't Standard.
I refunded the Sony I bought the Sangean PT80 (Spain Grundig PT80).
I like the receiver, I can listen to radios medium wave I can`t listen to with cheap portable radio.
The FM radio quality is better than cheap radio.
About Shortwave bands, broadcasting radio stations.

Speaking about Hamradio, citizen band. this receiver can save the day. But It s not a HF transceiver.

This receiver is old It has only ten memories,
It doesnīt have air band,
The memories erase without batteries.

I m not going to replace my receiver because I like that It works.

 
N3OJD Rating: 3/5 Jun 17, 2011 19:08 Send this review to a friend
Nice Ergonomics -- Poor Selectivity  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I guess as I get older (65) the ergonomics of a radio become more important. For example the simple rotary volume control, as opposed to a couple of buttons to slew up or down in volume, I find is quite a nice touch that means easier listening on crowded diverse mode shortwave bands. And the ergonomics on the PT-80 are quite nice. The radio is intuitive and simple to operate in that respect. The volume control falls right where you'd want it. The audio is decent and the various features are also good.

The deal killer for me is the bandwidth or selectivity. I enjoy monitoring the ham SSB bands and I'm guessing that the filter has got to be close to 10KHz wide. I couldn't find a single SSB QSO on 40M that didn't have a very distracting bit of noise from another QSO going on in the background. At the same time I tried my DE1106, G3, and SW7600G and none of them had any trouble isolating the same QSO with no background noise from any adjacent stations. Nuf said.

So... beautiful real leather case, middling audio, great ergonomics and sensitivity, but poor selectivity.

I'm keeping my modified Sony ICF-SW7600G and getting rid of the others. Life's too short for poor performance.
 
CLOSESHAVE6 Rating: 4/5 Apr 21, 2009 14:01 Send this review to a friend
Better than expected!  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
Sangean Pro Traveller 80(PT80). Also known as the Grundig YB 80 and in the UK the Roberts Radio Travelling Lite III R9969 (as used by me)

Bought off fleabay for Ģ45 Inc P&P about 7-8 months ago to take with me on overnite trips away from home..staying in farmhouse B&B's in Scotland, this wee radio has proved its worth when the rooms tv has had nothing but fuzzy pictures & crackly sound!

Arrived looking like brand-new, still cellophane-wrapped in its original unopened box c/w Earbuds, ANT-60 wind-up external shortwave antenna, very nice tan leather/suede travel cover case, a shortwave frequency guide to the BBC World service and the seller had included an original PUB-6 6V DC power FOC! I was mildly surprised with the radios' size but then again its no bigger or heavier than a decent hard-backed novel and still fits into my overnite bag! One downside I've noticed is its thirst for batteries..but maybe thats down to the amount of time I actually have it switched on. I use it at home a lot as well as when I'm away. I use (& recommend) 2000Mah Ni-Mh rechargeables and often carry a fully charged spare set just in case. (The clock remains active/visible even with the power switched off which may explain this.) Using the mains adaptor does result in a very irritating hum tho!

The Radio itself is quite easy to use and a quick read of the manual is all thats needed because storing stations (a paltry 45 of em!) is fairly intuitive. It even has a scan&store facility too. I only needed a quick reminder from the manual on how to re-set the clock for BST..in fact I've set the 2nd time-zone clock +1hr GMT so I only have to switch between the two. The Humane Wake System (alarm) is irritating..?! You can also wake up to a favorite radio station. I've used both but prefer to use a much loved travel-alarm!
The nite-lite is useful but could be a wee bit brighter and stays on for 7 secs unless the tuning dial is turned or buttons are pressed!
The input buttons are big enough even for my stumpy fingers. The volume dial, SSB switch & fine tune dial and tone switch are on the righthand side of the set with the volume being loud enough to distort at near full volume. The tuning is by the numbered buttons, up & down buttons or tuning dial, although it doesn't have a finger cut-out for spinning the dial. Tuning on all freq's bar FM can be done in 1Hz steps by simply pushing down on the tuning dial before turning. The aerial input socket, local/dx switch, FMmono/stereo switch, headphone & DC power input sockets are on the lefthand side.

Reception-wise, I've been more than surprised with what it can pick up on the shortwave bands! Its possibly to scroll thru from 1 end of the scale to the other non-stop or choose a meterband to jump straight to using the input buttons. I can clearly pick up Radio Australia late afternoon/early evening way up here in Scotland and a whole load of stations I've never even heard of along with all those we all know and enjoy.
Medium wave has totally blown me away! I can even clearly pick up a down-town Washington D.C. AM station! As expected tho, a lot of the UK AM & MW stations tend to wash over the lesser powered transmissions but a bit of off-freq twiddling & set-turning can make a difference.
Longwave & FM are both as expected..either overpowered or sparsley populated(LW)
I need to point out that all the above is just on the standard whip aerial..the longwire antenna totally floods the set on both SW & FM and I've spent too many hrs listening to hundreds of new stations!
SSB was a bit disappointing even on the longwire but that may just be a geographical thing. I've only been able to pick up a few hams but can clearly pick up the western eurpoe airports met report broadcast (Shannon Vol-Met?)

Maybe I got lucky when I bought this radio but I'm very pleased with its performance so far...although now I'm toying with the idea of getting a Degen/Kaito 1103 and/or a portable with airband as I'm frequently near Aberdeen Air/Heli-port. All in all tho, this radio is a pleasure to use and would totally recommend it to anyone that can find one!

I'd like to give this radio a 4.5 but this is my 1st review and after all it does have its minus points!
 


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