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Reviews Categories | Feedlines (coax, ladder-line, etc.) | Andrew Heliax Help


Reviews Summary for Andrew Heliax
Andrew Heliax Reviews: 21 Average rating: 5.0/5 MSRP: $(missing—add MSRP)
Description: 50 Ohm low loss coaxial cable
Product is in production.
More info: http://www.andrew.com/products/trans_line/heliax/default.aspx
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W9WZJ Rating: 5/5 Mar 19, 2013 20:32 Send this review to a friend
The best there is.   Time owned: more than 12 months
I have used my LDF-5 (7/8") Heliax for nearly a decade on VHF/UHF. It simply does not get any better. Outer coating is very durable, and the connectors are easier to put on than a PL-259.
Loss is low, only using larger diameter Heliax would be better. I got my 12 runs at a ham fest for cheap - much less than buying new 9913. Craigslist is a great place to find this stuff, too.
I only recommend 7/8" or larger, for 50mhz and up. Google: Heliax to learn more.
 
WB5ITT Rating: 5/5 Feb 25, 2013 22:27 Send this review to a friend
The standard in coaxial feedline  Time owned: more than 12 months
In my 40 years as a ham and 30+ years as a commercial two way tech and broadcast engineer, I have found nothing better than real Andrews Heliax. Though a bit expensive new (especially with copper prices at an all time high), it's worth it for best performance. You can find user Heliax for low prices and easily tell if it will be good or not (no kinks and no nicks or bullet holes usually means it is good to go). Older 1/2in foam Heliax required the center pin to be soldered whereas the newer connectors are captive...which I do not feel comfortable with but they do work if installed right. 7/8 and larger sizes requires hand tools (hacksaw, a sharp knife, flat blade screwdriver and file will usually do but if you have some shears, they can help) Also use Superflex for places that require sharp bends or some movement from time to time (say from main run to antenna or gear). If anyone is interested in some good used line, contact me for more details at my email address.
 
VE7IG Rating: 5/5 Dec 29, 2012 11:11 Send this review to a friend
Excellent  Time owned: more than 12 months
I use heliax on my 3 yagis and two verticals. The 7/8th diameter heliax on the 60 foot pipe allows me to use a line tuner in the shack on several bands witout much loss. I use the same heliax on my 20m yagi and tune it backwards on 17m with the line tuner. The 12m yagi uses smaller heliax but tunes up just as well on 15 and 10 backwards. It also does a great job on the 6 metre yagi. Long runs of 7/8th heliax to the back of the property pick up another vertical and a future 80m inverted V. A bundle of 3 pieces is buried for a length of 40 feet across the back yard reducing noise pickup. I dislike putting on the connectors but have done enough now to be able to do it correctly, though it still isnt that easy.
As others have pointed out, seal each connector against water absorption and heliax will last for many years. A lot of used heliax comes out of the oil patch in northern BC and Alberta and if it has been sealed against water absorption after removal it is perfect and it is economical. Also from time to time you can find great deals on Ebay. It can be sealed very effectively with rubber electrician's tape and coax sealing tar.
The first heliax I ever used 25-30 years ago came from a broadcast radio site where cows had gotten in and stepped on it. They replaced it all and a friend obtained several thousand feet in long usable pieces. I still use some of that and it is perfectly fine after all the years of use. If you can obtain it economically it can't be beat for feedline use.
 
M0BTZ Rating: 5/5 Aug 2, 2012 04:42 Send this review to a friend
I swear by it, and not at it  Time owned: more than 12 months
Andrews Heliax is the only game in town when it comes to low-loss transmission line for the VHF/UHF/Microwave bands.

Please dont waste this coax on HF feeder runs (except maybe where they are extreamily long!)

I use LDF2-50 for my 70Mhz and 144MHz setup and LDF4-50 for my 432MHz setup for a 60-70ft run.

Both cables are really excellent at delivering the most RF to the antenna with minimum possible loss. I have to compromise with flexibilty at my location, and tend to reserve the better stuff for use on the higher frequency bands.

I also own a 30m run of FSJ 5-50 which is reserved for use on a 432 or 1296MHz EME setup one day (Used to use it on 144MHz). But it can be tricky to unreel it in a confined space with just one person.

Maybe for a small antenna, you can replace the mast completely with a length of very thick Heliax!

I am not rich enough to buy it new especially now with the price of copper, but if you shop around carefully in the used market you can often uncover a bargain in a used reel of Heliax cable.

Inspect it carefully for water damage though!

It is much, much better than using RG213.

Short lengths of LMR400 or similar are very handy for a flexible link at the ends of the heliax!
 
AA4HA Rating: 5/5 Oct 31, 2010 10:30 Send this review to a friend
Only the slightest downside  Time owned: more than 12 months
I rate Heliax as a "5" across the board but do give few comments regarding the installation that would keep you from a perfect system;

If you use Ring-Flare connectors they are very finicky about making a perfect cut so the shield does flare out. If you can borrow a cable prep tool just for the connector work it is well worth it.

Make sure that you use a small file to bevel down the center conductor. If this is jagged it can cause an intermittent connection on the center pin.

Proper (and complete) weatherproofing is essential. This is a low density foam dielectric and if moisture can get into the cable you will have problems. Do not leave connectors without weatherproofing, even for one day.

Uncoil the Heliax, do not pull the kinks out of the cable. This stuff does kink easily and needs a bit more attention. Also, do not stand on it and follow the proper bend radii or you will kink it.

Use the silicone grease packet that comes with the connectors. Flood the entire inside of the connector body with this substance. It lubricates the O ring gasket and keeps moisture out of the Heliax.


I have used Heliax in commercial installations for several decades, if you follow the rules and take precautions this will be the last coax you will ever need to buy.
 
NI0C Rating: 5/5 Jul 23, 2009 19:44 Send this review to a friend
Sturdy and not hard to handle  Time owned: 0 to 3 months
I recently replaced the coax run under my driveway and the line to my remote relay box with Andrew FSJ4-50. Although the line is stiff and heavy compared to ordinary coax, I found these properties actually helped me in getting the line through the 1.5 inch PVC pipe buried under my driveway, as the hardline can be pushed as well as pulled.

This installation should last many years. As I have no experience in installing connectors to hardline, I chose to purchase pre-cut cables with N connectors installed by Cablexperts.
 
AG3B Rating: 5/5 Mar 2, 2009 08:31 Send this review to a friend
GREAT PRODUCT  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
MY STATION CONSISTS OF A YAESU FT450AT WITH A BUCKMASTER INVERTED V DIPOLE, 150 FEET OF 1/2 INCH ANDREW HELIAX TO THE SHACK. IF YOU ARE INTERSTED IN PUTTING UP A STATION THAT WILL LAST FOR YEARS THIS IS THE CABLE. I HAVE IT BURIED FROM THE SOURCE UNDER MY DRIVEWAY UP INTO THE SHACK IN THE ATTIC. THE PERFORMANCE IS OUTSTANDING RUNNING BAREFOOT I HAVE CONTACTED COUNTRIES ALL OVER THE WORLD. I HAVE ONLY BEEN LICENSED FOR 3 YEARS BUT PURCHASED THIS COAXIAL AFTER READING THE REVIEWS ON E HAM. YOU WONT BE DISSAPOINTED TOM KC2PSR
 
N2QQF Rating: 5/5 Nov 3, 2008 20:12 Send this review to a friend
the Best  Time owned: more than 12 months
I use Andrew Heliax for work applications I use 1/2" 7/8" 1-5/8" and leaky coax (Radiax) and I can only say that I live by Andrew cable. Comm-scope is OK too but very hard to work with for the larger cables. I feed my towers with 1/2" hardline because it obviously has less loss than the other type cables.

The cost is quite higher than the other RG8 & 213 LMR-400 etc... I do use some of these cables because it is hard to run 1/2" hard line to switches and radios but my main line feeds are all Andrew Heliax. Put the money into Coax and Antennas and you will reep the benefits. I have a low noise floor which has to do with my grounds but also using good feed line reduces other interference weather from TX and also RX.

Spend the money on good equipment, it is worth it.
 
N1RIK Rating: 5/5 Oct 31, 2008 20:01 Send this review to a friend
The Best  Time owned: more than 12 months
I've used 3/8" and 1/2" heliax on my repeaters, and have never had to worry about it going "bad" on me. Anytime I had desense issues (which I have solved), it's been due to either the duplexer or jumpers, but not the main feedline.
 
K4LD Rating: 5/5 Aug 2, 2008 10:04 Send this review to a friend
Exceptional  Time owned: more than 12 months
I have worked with many different types of feedlines, and Andrew's Heliax is by far the best that there is.

I have 3/8" Heliax on all of my antenna's from 160-10. I don't have long runs of feedline, in fact my longest run is only 100'. When asked why I use commercial grade feedline, on my antenna's, I give folks these numbers:

100 Watts into generic RG8X at 14 MHz with a 100' feedline length gives you about 78 watts going into your antenna.

1500 Watts into generic RG8X at 14 MHz with a 100' feedline length gives you only about 1168 watts going into your antenna.

100 Watts into generic RG-213 at 14 MHz with a 100' feedline length gives you about 83 watts going into your antenna.

1500 Watts into generic RG-213 at 14 MHz with a 100' feedline length gives you about 1265 watts going into your antenna.

Lets do Andrews Heliax:

100 Watts into Andrews Heliax LDF4-50A (1/2" Hardline) at 14 MHz with a 100' feedline length gives you about 95 watts going into your antenna.

1500 Watts into Andrews Heliax LDF4-50A (1/2" Hardline) at 14 MHz with a 100' feedline length gives you about 1418 watts going into your antenna.

With RX, I can hear DX way before my neighbors who are running RG-213, or RG8X.

I would never run anything but Heliax on my antenna's. Between TX/RX I notice a difference, and it's a good one!
 
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