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Reviews Categories | QRP Radios (5 watts or less) | NCG Company 15SB Help


Reviews Summary for NCG Company 15SB
NCG Company 15SB Reviews: 1 Average rating: 1.0/5 MSRP: $(missing—add MSRP)
Description: 15 meter monoband SSB/CW mobile transceiver
Product is in production.
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KU4QD Rating: 1/5 Apr 13, 2000 11:24 Send this review to a friend
Clunky and awkward. Get the later version instead  Time owned: unknown months
The NCG Company, best known for importing Comet antennas, also sold this rig in the early 1980's. Unlike the later NCG-15M, which was quite good in it's time, the NCG-15SB was clunky and awkward. You can't tune across the band easily with this rig. Instead, you have a separate knob for 100khz, a separate one for 10Khz, and a third that goes up 5khz or back to Zero. Try to think of the thumbwheels on an IC-2AT handheld, and imagine using that kind of tuning system on HF! There is a VXO control to fine tune between the 5khz steps, so you can get on frequency for a QSO, but casual tuning around the band is somewhere between a pain and impossible. CW is worse than sideband, as you have to manually switch between transmit and receive in CW. Argh! Oh, and a CW filter? Forget it, there isn't one. This rig was made for SSB, and CW is a poorly executed afterthought. The receiver sensitivity and selectivity are OK for SSB operation, so the rig is usable. The red LED display washes out in bright sunlight, but is otherwise OK. The rig has two power settings: 10 watts and 2 watts, as I remember. The rig is also big: about the size of a Kenwood TS-430 sliced in half. You can recognize this rig easily: gray in color and bright chrome knobs. Considering that the later model, the NCG-15M, which is black in color, often goes cheaply at hamfests, this older rig is one to avoid.
 


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