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Can you imagine your shack without a PC? Just plain paper for notes and Logging, manual control of your rig with no Digi modes?
  Posted: Apr 09, 2011   (1747 votes, 54 comments) by SV2HTC

  No! A PC is an integral part of my ham station and could not do without it
  No! I'm Digi modes most of the time so I need a PC to operate!
  Yes, I'm still a pen and paper kinda guy...
  I can do both, but I'm not reliant on a computer to have fun...
    (1747 votes, 54 comments)

Survey Results
No! A PC is an integral part of my ham station and could not do without it 28% (492)
No! I'm Digi modes most of the time so I need a PC to operate! 4% (75)
Yes, I'm still a pen and paper kinda guy... 16% (283)
I can do both, but I'm not reliant on a computer to have fun... 51% (897)

Survey Comments
No PC here normally...
To me, ham radio, particularly the "preparedness" part of it, is the one thing I can do to "rough it" a bit. That is, go back to the basics. I strongly prefer to operate ham radio "organically"...me, the radio, the person I'm in QSO with, a pencil and paper. When I flip the switch, the radio is on. The computer takes time to boot. I don't want to wait.

I'm a DXer among other things and a computer really is handy for tracking progress. But most of the time, when I find a DX station, I have worked them before the computer is booted. So, I naturally paper-log first, then transfer to the computer once it's booted. No, I don't leave any computer running 24X7...seems like a colossal waste of electricity.

When contesting, the priorities change. Rate is what matters, and then the computer, CW interface, rotator interface, etc, all come into play. In my case, usually at someone else's shack.

- k

Posted by KASSY on September 18, 2011

PC needed???
I enjoy both approaches.

Station one is highly computerized, K3, microKeyer 2, LP-PAN PSDR/IF, powerful PC with three large screens, water cooled CPU and video board.

Station two is a 75A4, HT-37, Viking 2, 25 watt outboard vintage audio, vintage station accessories, no PC.

Both share a common antenna tuner and modest antenna farm.

I run the K3 mostly during contests, or when the vintage station is down.

Sometimes I use both, operate on the vintage station and use the K3, via a RX splitter, to run the LP-PAN PSDR/IF panadapter so I can observe AM signal quality or band conditions.

Not sure which way I would go if I had to settle for one or the other.

73 Jack KZ5A

Posted by KZ5A on June 28, 2011

A PC?
PCs are great, but nowhere near a necessity. Worked the
world in the "60s and '70s, before you ever saw a personal
computer in the home! Just a mike, a radio and a wire,
can give one a hell of a thrill.

Posted by ONAIR on May 15, 2011

PC optional
A computer is a wonderrful servant in the shack but is not required for me to have fun or provide public service communications. I still keep a hand-writen log and try to make a few CW contacts using a straight key in order to keep my fist readable. Yes, I use a paddle, and sometimes use a computer for digital modes, but if the computer went away tomorrow, I would get just as much enjoyment out of Amateur Radio as I do today.

73 DE KAØGKT/7
--Steve

Posted by KA0GKT on May 7, 2011

PC What?
I am not a computer person by any stretch. But I took the plunge a year ago and bought a Flex 5000A. My shack has tubes and microprocessors and I couldn't be happier. The panadapter in the flex really puts a new slant on operating the bands. New tricks for old dogs! I guess I need the computer if I want to play with the Flex.

Posted by WB9NJB on May 7, 2011

PC +ham radio
I use HF cw on 40-30-20-15 meters also use cq100 on both cw and voice. Use cpu for qrz.com and use Buckmaster with my cpu for keeping my ham notes on stations I qso. So a cpu is part of my ham station. w4ddd

Posted by W4DDD on May 7, 2011

Ham fun.
For fun and enjoyment I use my ham gear. If I feel in need of frustration I try and get my computer to do what I want it to do! Started a bit late in life on tinbrains (computers) and they still get the better of me, but someday I'll grow to like them-- (possibly, have my doubts though)

Posted by ZS1FCS on April 30, 2011

Computer in the shack....
Well I find I spend alot of my free time on a
pc. But Not that I have gotten into ham radio
i find myself limited my pc and radio use at
the same time. I have discovered the PC
actually degrades my HF fun..... I am moving
towards turning off the pc during my HF
time... this does a alot of things for ME i
can then focus, and it eliminates alot of the
HF noise in my recieve... (still working on
that problem) and it makes me paper log and
learn the ways of a before pc world.

Just my 2 cents...
AVID PC user and Newly introduced into the HF
world.

Posted by KF7ELU on April 28, 2011

computer in shack
N6RLS, you mean they actually put Processors in ham rigs? well who would have thunk? I had no idea. I guess now I will have to trade my rig for a spark-gap transmitter.

Posted by N4ZFL on April 27, 2011

computer in shack...
Well, seems that most if not all of the modern transceivers are crammed with computing power (microprocessors) so, unless you're all-boatanchor, you've got a "computer" in the shack by default. As for having an actual computer in addition to the transceiver, I'm all for it - on the other hand I _can_ enjoy ham radio very well with just the radio. I'm a big fan of SDR and computer-assisted hamming...

I think a niche market may exist for boatanchor-modeling: SDR radios with boatanchor "skins" - like the amp-modeling and mic-modeling used by musicians. Would give the flavor of using an old tube rig but with modern SDR advantages and tricks. Someone will do it...

Posted by N6RLS on April 27, 2011

computer in shack
If I had to have a PC to operate, I probably would not even have a radio station. I do computer networking for a living and the last thing I want to do for fun is sit down at a computer. I tried Digital modes but hated it. One of the great things about amateur radio is that there is a broad range of things to do. So no matter what your related interest is, you can probably enjoy being a ham.

Posted by N4ZFL on April 26, 2011

Imagine
The topic was to imagine it... not to actually do it. Sure, I can imagine keeping the computer turned off. Doesn't mean I'd like it or be the most efficient without it. Perhaps the purpose of the question was to make us think how dependent we have become on this one piece of gear. Digital modes, callsign lookup, DX cluster, reverse beacons, propagation forecasting, logging, email, submitting contest logs, ezines and newsletters, alerts and warnings, clock in UTC, grey line map, downloading manuals, upgrading firmware, band data control for accessories, spectral displays, DVK and CW keyers, Skimmer, online purchases of gear, components from commercial vendors, online swap & shop, rig control, reading online product reviews (like eHam), programming of homebrew circuitry (PIC controllers, etc.), downloading satellite info, remote station control, and the list seems to go on and on. Perhaps the other reason for raising this topic is to make us think how creative and productive hams have been in making this tool help us in so many different ways. While I can imagine not using the PC (I started out without one and did just fine), I'd rather not be without one. It has become "the right tool for the right job".

Jerry VE6TL

Posted by VE6TL on April 25, 2011

Imagine
The topic was to imagine it... not to actually do it. Sure, I can imagine keeping the computer turned off. Doesn't mean I'd like it or be the most efficient without it. Perhaps the purpose of the question was to make us think how dependent we have become on this one piece of gear. Digital modes, callsign lookup, DX cluster, reverse beacons, propagation forecasting, logging, email, submitting contest logs, ezines and newsletters, alerts and warnings, clock in UTC, grey line map, downloading manuals, upgrading firmware, band data control for accessories, spectral displays, DVK and CW keyers, Skimmer, online purchases of gear, components from commercial vendors, online swap & shop, rig control, reading online product reviews (like eHam), programming of homebrew circuitry (PIC controllers, etc.), downloading satellite info, remote station control, and the list seems to go on and on. Perhaps the other reason for raising this topic is to make us think how creative and productive hams have been in making this tool help us in so many different ways. While I can imagine not using the PC (I started out without one and did just fine), I'd rather not be without one. It has become "the right tool for the right job".

Jerry VE6TL

Posted by VE6TL on April 25, 2011

To each his own
My Pegasus absolutely requires a PC to function at all. However, for the rest of the shack it is simply a convenience (or a bother, depending on what needs done). I enjoy working with a PC, spent much of my career writing code and designing process control interfaces, but a good old-fashioned QSO with a notepad and logbook are what it fun.

Posted by K4IQT on April 22, 2011

For logging
In my case, the PC is there for logging and looking up facts about some of the DX QTHs that I have worked. The Google Earth interface with Ham Radio Deluxe is especially nice for actually seeing the QTH of the guy you just worked.

Larry W2LJ

Posted by W2LJ on April 21, 2011

comp in shack
dont care too much for digital modes,,however hrd is the balls fo improving my cw speed

Posted by K1LLR on April 20, 2011

Comment to W9GOD
Ten Tec SRD??? No such thing. Software controlled radio or software assisted radio..yes. Software defined radio is completely different. Please look up what SDR is on many sources. Wikipedia has a good explanation.

There are only a few SRD manufactuers for ham radio presently. Some hams think that their K3's are SRD. NO! Some functionality may be defined in software, but in the case of radios such as Flex radio. That is a TRUE software defined radio and the radio does not work without a computer to defined EVERYTHING!. Your Ten Tec will work without a computer, a K3 will work without a computer, but a Flex will not(as it is truly defined in software). Little clarification. Many hams find SRD's a mystery and unless you are really technically saavy and are very computer literate, I suggest that they learn more about SRD before taking the plunge.

73

Posted by KB6QXM on April 20, 2011

Computers
I have a computer for my recording studio and still have not figured out how to use it fully but as for my station, no way. I'm an OT and my favorite rig is a near-mint Heathkit DX-60B AM/CW xmtr with matching rcvr and VFO. Lots of adjustments to make but that's half the fun!

Posted by W9ZSL on April 19, 2011

Be Tolerant
It fascinates me how some have such a narrow view of everything; they want to impose that view on others. We see this in everyday life often now which causes a lot of problems. They feel if everybody doesn't do something as they do, then that other person is doing it wrong. Open your mind, be tolerant, allow individuality. Your way is one way; another way can be good too!

Posted by VA1CQ on April 19, 2011

Be Tolerant
It fascinates me how some have such a narrow view of everything; they want to impose that view on others. We see this in everyday life often now which causes a lot of problems. They feel if everybody doesn't do something as they do, then that other person is doing it wrong. Open your mind, be tolerant, allow individuality. Your way is one way; another way can be good too!

Posted by VA1CQ on April 19, 2011

PC,S in radio
Well said,KD7GGQ. I agree 100%,long live REAL RADIO.NO COMPUTERS. 73.MICHAEL.G1WFK

Posted by G1WFK on April 19, 2011

Ham radio is a hobby and it should be about having fun. Why should you "automate" things, as one comment put it? If operating your ham radio is a chore that needs something to make it less tedious, you're doing it wrong.

Might as well just communicate through the internet - internet over a cell phone or wifi is a much easier antenna to put up than those things neighbors like to complain to hams about.

This debate is like getting a sports car with a big engine but getting it with an automatic transmission. Just ask any car nut why they prefer a manual.

Posted by KD7GGQ on April 18, 2011

Each has its purpose
Like hand tools and power tools, each has it's purpose. A drill motor can drill real fast and maybe more accurately, but the old hand cranked or egg beater drill will do the job, too. My Makita battery powered drill motor is very convenient, but when the battery dies, the old Black and Decker plug in comes to the rescue (unless the second battery is charged). Each has its place.

In today's world of high tech stuff, it is easy to forget that things can go wrong. We as HAMs should be prepared for this. During the earth quake the tower falls , the mains go down, the Mic gets smashed, and in the panick you for get the battery pack. What are you going to Do?

This is where your ability to improvise, adapt, and overcome is put to the test. I know you all have thought of these contingencies.

73

Steve

Posted by KB6HZQ on April 17, 2011

A computer is a tool that is great when you need one. However, total dependency on computers is not only incredibly stupid but dangerous as well. I spent some years in military comms and know what can happen!Murphy just loves you hams who are totally dependent on computers. If the crap hits the fan, and it probably will, the SDR guys will be royally screwed! Use computers but have a strong analog base as well.

Posted by WA1UFO on April 16, 2011

Can you imagine your shack without a PC?
Flip or Flop - - To be or NOT to be is that the question?? Well here is where I stand on the PC issue. My Ten Tec Ham Radio "SDR" station is a computer, so my PC talks to my SDR and my SDR talks to my PC. So the real question is "CAN WE ALL JUST GET ALONG"?? My SDR and PC do - LOL!!! LOL!!!

Posted by W9GOD on April 16, 2011

My computer is on whenever I'm in the shack. I mostly work
the digital modes; it's a great leveler. With my modest station
and less-than-optimal antenna there's no way I can go up
against a better equipped station on phone but using PSK31,
I can work some real DX.

Posted by KJ6BSO on April 16, 2011

Not necessary for comms but...
I have not gotten into digital modes where it is naturally required, so I don't use a compuiter for communication purposes. However, in amateur radio off-air pursuits, yes. E-QSL, reverse beacon, radio research on the internet, blogs and personal pages, e-ham and QRZ call books, etc., sure is helpful. Almost necessary.

Posted by N2UGB on April 16, 2011

Can you imagine your shack without a PC? Just plain paper for notes and Log
I Like having the PC, but I only use it for contest logging.

73, Will

Posted by AE6YB on April 15, 2011

All electric on the east coast dies due to a grid failure. PC-no good. Your laptop battery dies. You turn on your generator. Plug in Rig to DC output, PC to AC output. You run your station for 5 hours, generator runs out of gas! Station doa. You have a 12 volt gel cell battery. Rig will work on gel cell. Computer will not. BUT, station is still DOA, because it solely depends on PC. Station is DEAD forever. Sorry, no PC dependency for me! End Of Story!

Posted by KU2US on April 15, 2011

whatever works
I use both. When the power is out and I am running the rig on battery I use pen and paper. Storms coming? Oh no shut down the computer! But I still play radio without it! Digitial modes? Ok they are fun but not the end all be all of radio. Plus there are WAY WAY more digitial modes than just PSK and some are even fun! SSB is fun too. Sitting back in the easy chair with my headset on chatting on SSB without having to look at a screen or type is nice and relaxing. Can I live without the computer in the shack? Sure. will I? Probably not unless forced to. Do I need a PC for logging, nope. Do I use one? sometimes. Does my PC run my radio for me? Nope but it can if I want.
Saying you only do it one way or the other is limiting yourself.
Just my opinion of course. YMMV
Dan/NØFPE

Posted by N0FPE on April 15, 2011

I find the PC is a nice addition to the rig setup to check someone's call info on QRZ.com but 90-95% of my enjoyment is the QSO. The PC also adds the capability to operate PSK-31 and RTTY. But rarely operate these two modes.

The PC also makes it possible for me to do firmware updates to the rig.

Posted by K1MMI on April 15, 2011

I LOVE THE FEEL
Have to feel a book in my hands while I read it. Books on computer? You must be kidding. Love the feel of the knobs and push buttons on my transceiver. Computerized rig control? Wonderfully efficient but spiritually dead. No feeling comes with it. Cannot emotionally connect to a computer like you can traditional radio gear. Have yet to see the computer monitor that gives me the glow I feel while watching a pair of 3-500Z rf amplifier tubes doing their thing. The feel of my straight key in my hand. Computer based everything = too sterile for me.

Posted by K7NSW on April 14, 2011

not reliant on pc
A pc is a good tool that can add to the enjoyment of ham radio but it is not essential for me. I think electronic logging and web based callbooks are great, but agn not essential. I am new to psk, but have found it to be not as efficient as cw. Seems to me that psk requires more power for identical band conditions. This is probably due to the fact that psk requires more bandwidth. So for identical power levels, psk will not perform as well because it's power per hertz or power density is less when compared to cw. Also, when the computer breaks say 73 to using psk.

Again a pc is a good tool but definitely not essential for fun in my shack.

Posted by KM9R on April 13, 2011

I like both of them:
I think it is short sighted to write off the
pen/pencil and paper because I never say never.
I like using a computer. However, computers
are dated and programs change. So much for
archiving data or so to me unless on paper.
The main advantage of a computer is efficiency.
The main advantage of pen/pencil and paper is
it does not get outdated like computers do and
their programs do or, even worse, it crashes.

Posted by K0IC on April 12, 2011

A Modern Ham Shack....
I've been licensed since 1964. As much as having a key was essential then -- to me having a PC in the station is now as vital a piece of gear. In fact, during a recent station "clean-up" I put the Bencher paddle in a clear plastic bag and put it up away on a shelf. I'm no more likely to use it that I am likely to turn in my IC-7000 and fire up an old tube rig.

Nowadays, I find myself much more involved with the digital modes, particularly PSK31 than even with SSB. And compared to CW -- PSK blows it away.

Simply put, the average ham can pass far more info via PSK31 than CW and do so at even lower power levels.

Combine PSK with the "lookup" command that automatically brings up the other station's info on QRZ.com and you are enjoying a powerful tool that eliminates callbooks, paper logs etc.

It is amazing to me how this supposedly hi-tech avocation often gets bogged-down in some kind of nostalgia for old radios, CW and paper logs and QSL cards.

I went through that era. That was then, this is now.

Posted by KE2IV on April 12, 2011

I've got enough clutter around the shack, and I'm sure most in this forum does as well. In this day and age, why not a PC? PSK31, electronic log, rig control, etc. Paper only for QSL cards.

73

Posted by KG6WLS on April 11, 2011

IS my Shack !

Due to CC&R's etc My Home QTH Laptop has been my ' shack ' for Echolink. ;)

It's been invaluable to reliably natter back to the U.K. and World Repeaters under the circumstances.

G3SEA/KH6

Posted by G3SEA on April 11, 2011

Oh yes, by the way
I also still am an old school paper logger. Many laughs have been shared with ops on the other end of the ether as I rifled through the paper log frantically trying to see why that rhythm coming through the speaker sounded so familiar. Of course the ops with logging programs were always happy to offer the date as for my not having to head to the book shelf in the filled up log archives. I can only imagine how difficult it would be to attempt to transfer 16 years of paper logs to the PC... what an undertaking that would be... months of entering the info and a high stress deal !

:-) Jim N8NSN

Posted by N8NSN on April 11, 2011

When in certain situations...
I have recently had to change addresses on a temporary basis. What I can't imagine is any long time span without HF (even on just a listening basis). UHF and VHF are simple enough to keep up with the local and even node linked HF listening and talking. What is different in my current circumstance is there is no way I can even put up a small wire receiving antenna for HF. So, right now I am happy that there are receivers that can be accessed on the PC via the internet to keep my code chops up to par. I sure miss making contacts on 160 - 30 meters via CW, but feel fortunate to still be able to listen in to the op's that I have made OTA friendships with.

73 & I will be listening :-) N8NSN Jim, Dayton, OH

Posted by N8NSN on April 11, 2011

Computers & Ham Radio
"Whatever gets you through the night," as John Lennon once sang. If you think computers are part & parcel to the Ham radio experience, so be it. Who am I to judge...?

Still, I must say, I can NOT cotton to those photos I increasingly see of Big Gun CW contesting stations in the different magazines showing the operator seated before his transceiver---but with a lap top front & centre-most in the view...and narry a key/keyer/bug to be seen anywhere!

Call me old, call me a dinosaur, call me dead, I don't care. But personally, I simply do NOT like it! :>)

Posted by VE3CUI on April 11, 2011

Computers & Ham Radio
"Whatever gets you through the night," as John Lennon once sang. If you think computers are part & parcel to the Ham radio experience, so be it. Who am I to judge...?

Still, I must say, I can NOT cotton to those photos I increasingly see of Big Gun CW contesting stations in the different magazines showing the operator seated before his transceiver---but with a lap top front & centre-most in the view...and narry a key/keyer/bug to be seen anywhere!

Call me old, call me a dinosaur, call me dead, I don't care. But personally, I simply do NOT like it! :>)

Posted by VE3CUI on April 11, 2011

PC Not Needed
I find a computer useful for checking out E-Ham, QRZ and
the like. Personally, I have less than no use for a
computer in my shack. I see all around me, where hams
have become dependent on these complex devices and it
is not necessarily a good thing. Simplicity is one thing
that has seen ham radio get messages through when all
else failed, at times. Hooking a battery-draining
computer to a radio system just increases the chance for
failure in a disaster or other emergency, IMHO.

A popular hf, traffic-oriented, net that I regularly check in
to has ceased publishing a yearly net roster, which used to
have the canned messages used for brevity in traffic
handling in them. They now expect that all members have
a computer AND a printer so they can keep a current list
of the canned messages. I do not have a reliable internet
connection or a printer. As such, I already see the sheer
folly of relying on computers should the shtf or some
other emergency present itself. How un-cool to be
bumping into walls in the dark while trying to remember
what canned message br549 says. They say it saves
money but I feel they are going to be penny wise and
pound foolish when we find ourselves operating without
our treasured computer toys.

At best, a radio is a device with many potentials for
problems or failure. A computer is the same, only more
so. Combine the two and you multiply the potential for
failure and trouble.

Radio + Computer = Murphy's dream

Posted by KV4BL on April 11, 2011

The PC an Integral Part of the Hobby
I can't imagine ham radio without Narrow Band TV (NBTV), SSTV, digital voice, PSK31, and more. All made possible by the PC. And there are more modes yet to come. The PC has opened up many possibilities for the experimenter.

Other software for the amateur include antenna analysis software (EZNEC and others), software for use with antenna analyzers (Palstar and others), rig control software, SDR software and much more.

So for me the PC is an integral part of the hobby.

73, Rick, WA6NUT (licensed in 1960)

Posted by WA6NUT on April 11, 2011

Dependency not good.
Do you remember the beginning of the old legal ads in the local newspaper? They used to begin, "We the people of the State of (enter your state) by the grace of God free and independent do hereby ...etc."

Computers are a great convenience, but...
GPS is a great convenience, but ...
Cell phones are a great convenience, but ...
AC outlets are a great convenience, but ...

Back up alternative power sources are great.
A compass and a knife are great.
Wooden matches are great.
Portable and H/T rigs are great.
Quick up antennas are great.
Knowing edible plants, first aid, and survival is great.

Fast food and electronic entertainment is okay now and then, but ...

Physical fitness is great.

To merge the Army slogan and the old legal notice preamble:

Be all you can be - by the grace of God free and independent.

Go for it, hams!

Posted by AI2IA on April 11, 2011

Cutting Edge
Considering that I am building a station that is completly run by a computer, I could not do without building my powerhouse computer. Of course without the low DPC latency computer, I could not run my Flex 5000a.

Computers are here to stay in Ham radio and all forms of 21st century existance.

Posted by KB6QXM on April 10, 2011

Just a convenience
I haven't done some of the newer digital modes, but I do use computer for looking up calls and logging. It simply makes it easier to use LOTW and eQSL as well as immediately knowing that you've worked a gentleman several years back and finding notes that you've kept on him. Family and work responsibilities come first which leave precious little time for ham radio. The computer helps me make the most of my operating time.

Posted by N9EF on April 10, 2011

DXing
I sure have more fun DXing when I can look at the spots on eHam and DX Summit, but sometimes I feel like it's cheating. But so what, I'm only in it for the fun, I don't do contests or stay home from work to catch a DXpedition, or any of that serious stuff. I guess you could say I'm a "casual" DXer. For the real serious guys intending to make the top of the honor roll, they ought to make a separate class of awards that are earned without computer spotting assistance, like some of the contests. As for the digital modes, what fun! I really enjoy them. They add so much to the hobby. If computers vanished tomorrow, I'd really miss PSK31, RTTY, etc.

Posted by WB2GMK on April 10, 2011

Not a PC, a Mac instead...
Actually, I rarely use a computer in concert with the radio.
The main thing I might do is look up a call on QRZ or
something else. I use paper and pencil (spiral bound
college-ruled notebooks) as my logs. I like this, I can
scribble anything I want to put down that might be useful
along with the log entry. Every so often, I will enter my
log book information into my own home-brew logging
application. The computer is not really needed as part of
my radio work.

But, as an earlier post suggests, does this say I am "old".
Actually, I am a young 63 year old who loves computers
and programming. I have been a professional
programmer since the late 1960s, I am a cofounder of a
very successful software & systems company, and
programming is my second (or, third) hobby. I have a
computer in front of me most of my awake hours of the
day. But, not when I am on the air.

Oh, of course, I do not contest.

Posted by K7PEH on April 10, 2011

Not a PC, a Mac instead...
Actually, I rarely use a computer in concert with the radio.
The main thing I might do is look up a call on QRZ or
something else. I use paper and pencil (spiral bound
college-ruled notebooks) as my logs. I like this, I can
scribble anything I want to put down that might be useful
along with the log entry. Every so often, I will enter my
log book information into my own home-brew logging
application. The computer is not really needed as part of
my radio work.

But, as an earlier post suggests, does this say I am "old".
Actually, I am a young 63 year old who loves computers
and programming. I have been a professional
programmer since the late 1960s, I am a cofounder of a
very successful software & systems company, and
programming is my second (or, third) hobby. I have a
computer in front of me most of my awake hours of the
day. But, not when I am on the air.

Oh, of course, I do not contest.

Posted by K7PEH on April 10, 2011

Not a PC, a Mac instead...
Actually, I rarely use a computer in concert with the radio.
The main thing I might do is look up a call on QRZ or
something else. I use paper and pencil (spiral bound
college-ruled notebooks) as my logs. I like this, I can
scribble anything I want to put down that might be useful
along with the log entry. Every so often, I will enter my
log book information into my own home-brew logging
application. The computer is not really needed as part of
my radio work.

But, as an earlier post suggests, does this say I am "old".
Actually, I am a young 63 year old who loves computers
and programming. I have been a professional
programmer since the late 1960s, I am a cofounder of a
very successful software & systems company, and
programming is my second (or, third) hobby. I have a
computer in front of me most of my awake hours of the
day. But, not when I am on the air.

Oh, of course, I do not contest.

Posted by K7PEH on April 10, 2011

Not a PC, a Mac instead...
Actually, I rarely use a computer in concert with the radio.
The main thing I might do is look up a call on QRZ or
something else. I use paper and pencil (spiral bound
college-ruled notebooks) as my logs. I like this, I can
scribble anything I want to put down that might be useful
along with the log entry. Every so often, I will enter my
log book information into my own home-brew logging
application. The computer is not really needed as part of
my radio work.

But, as an earlier post suggests, does this say I am "old".
Actually, I am a young 63 year old who loves computers
and programming. I have been a professional
programmer since the late 1960s, I am a cofounder of a
very successful software & systems company, and
programming is my second (or, third) hobby. I have a
computer in front of me most of my awake hours of the
day. But, not when I am on the air.

Oh, of course, I do not contest.

Posted by K7PEH on April 10, 2011

Some hams are just to old
Computers are in almost everyone’s life from your car to the watch you have on your wrist. Why would you not use a computer to automate your ham shack? If you are not using one, I have one word for you ----- “Old”. Just lay down, close your eyes, fold your arms, have someone call the relatives, you are dead.

Posted by W3OZ on April 10, 2011

Why?
A PC is a tool, kind of like a power cable that supplies power to your radio. A PC is that indispensable to ham radio, for those who are comfortable with one. To those under 30 years of age, I think they would ask: "Why would you want to consider NOT having a PC?". It's a tool, nothing more.

Posted by VA1CQ on April 10, 2011

PC needed
Keying, digital, logging, etc...

A PC adds to the fun.

73
Dan

--
Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Clark County Indiana. EM78el
K9ZF /R no budget Rover ***QRP-l #1269 Check out the Rover Resource Page at:
<http://www.qsl.net/n9rla> List Administrator for: InHam+grid-loc+ham-books
Ask me how to join the Indiana Ham Mailing list!

Posted by K9ZF on April 9, 2011

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