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eHam.net Survey

Survey Question
Current Survey Question

Looking back to YOUR start in Ham radio, with an eye to "...the way things are in the world" to-day, do you think that you would have become an Amateur radio operator if you were somehow miraculously the same age as when you started, but in 2014?

Recent Surveys

R.F.I.---the continuing scourge of Ham radio, be it "traditional" horizontal oscillators of TVs going back to the 40's, or the raucous din of to-day's plasma televisions, exercise equipment, lighting systems, furnaces, electric fences, power line leakages, AD NAUSEAM. How have YOU handled cases where somebody's electric contraption seriously hampered YOUR on-the-air activities...?
2014-07-31


What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
2014-06-26


Do you consult radio beacons for propagation conditions?
2014-04-28


Do you think social media i.e Facebook, Twitter is a help or a hindrance to the Hobby?
2014-03-19


Do you use the 60-meter band?
2014-02-11


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Please note that there are many
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an international audience.

"That's it---I'm giving up on Ham radio, forever!" Have you ever uttered such blasphemy in the course of your Amateur radio "career"? Maybe you feel that way right now. If so, what was it that brought you to this decision...?
  Posted: Aug 21, 2012   (1233 votes, 63 comments) by VE3CUI

  I worked all the DXCC countries on the list---there's nothing new to get out there anymore, and the few times that there are, they're separated by too many years!
  The new "breed" of Ham to-day just is NOT my cup of tea---a bunch of glorified CB'ers, in my opinion!
  I'm getting too old for this game: can't climb towers, can't hear well enough for CW, can't see good enough to homebrew. Time to hang it up!
  It's just plain boring---the thrill of it all has vaporized!
  I'm tired of all of the restrictions on Ham radio: neighbourhood covenants, antenna restrictions, RFI to all of the imported "toys" anymore...I'm sick of it!
  I can't afford it anymore: a new transceiver costs more than the down payment I originally put on my house!
  "Give up MY Ham radio"...?! NEVER! They'll have to pry my key/mic out of my cold, dead hands!
    (1233 votes, 63 comments)

Survey Results
I worked all the DXCC countries on the list---there's nothing new to get out there anymore, and the few times that there are, they're separated by too many years! 1% (7)
The new "breed" of Ham to-day just is NOT my cup of tea---a bunch of glorified CB'ers, in my opinion! 10% (120)
I'm getting too old for this game: can't climb towers, can't hear well enough for CW, can't see good enough to homebrew. Time to hang it up! 1% (17)
It's just plain boring---the thrill of it all has vaporized! 7% (83)
I'm tired of all of the restrictions on Ham radio: neighbourhood covenants, antenna restrictions, RFI to all of the imported "toys" anymore...I'm sick of it! 3% (39)
I can't afford it anymore: a new transceiver costs more than the down payment I originally put on my house! 3% (32)
"Give up MY Ham radio"...?! NEVER! They'll have to pry my key/mic out of my cold, dead hands! 76% (935)

Survey Comments
Newer Ham
Being new, there is still much to learn and it's hard for to really comment overall as I have been it it for about a year.

Things that bother me, the guys who always have to put someone down because they don't know as much as the blowhard does, too many articals in Mags about stations that cost more than I made in a period of 5 years at times in my life.
For me, too much on DX pileups, I have no intention of working them, waiting till the guys running 2000 watts (yea, I know 1500 is the limit, tell that to some) with 200' towers full of Yagi's are done walking on top of everyone. Not my cup of tea, but if it's what you like to do, go for it. No bad feelings towards the average guy with a nice station doing his best to add another contact.

I much prefer to rag chew, relax and enjoy the hobby, make some DX contacts, learn everything I can and be a good operator.

I have very much come to enjoy HF, VHF/UHF reminded me too much of CB somedays and not much good in the way of rag chews. I keep a good VHF station for EMCOMMS as I live in a rural area, someplace where Amatuer radio could really be of some use, lots of back up from LE and the Emergency group who seem to appriciate the one's who will do whatever is asked of them.

Radio has something in it for just about everyone, some just need to realize that the new guys need some help from time to time and remember where they came from. There are some great Elmers out there who do and a couple have been a great help to me.

My greatest challange is learning much of the new high tech radio. At this point, the regular radio is fine with me. Packet, internet ect. has been fun also.

John

Posted by KF7VXA on February 15, 2013

Newer Ham
Being new, there is still much to learn and it's hard for to really comment overall as I have been it it for about a year.

Things that bother me, the guys who always have to put someone down because they don't know as much as the blowhard does, too many articals in Mags about stations that cost more than I made in a period of 5 years at times in my life.
For me, too much on DX pileups, I have no intention of working them, waiting till the guys running 2000 watts (yea, I know 1500 is the limit, tell that to some) with 200' towers full of Yagi's are done walking on top of everyone. Not my cup of tea, but if it's what you like to do, go for it. No bad feelings towards the average guy with a nice station doing his best to add another contact.

I much prefer to rag chew, relax and enjoy the hobby, make some DX contacts, learn everything I can and be a good operator.

I have very much come to enjoy HF, VHF/UHF reminded me too much of CB somedays and not much good in the way of rag chews. I keep a good VHF station for EMCOMMS as I live in a rural area, someplace where Amatuer radio could really be of some use, lots of back up from LE and the Emergency group who seem to appriciate the one's who will do whatever is asked of them.

Radio has something in it for just about everyone, some just need to realize that the new guys need some help from time to time and remember where they came from. There are some great Elmers out there who do and a couple have been a great help to me.

My greatest challange is learning much of the new high tech radio. At this point, the regular radio is fine with me. Packet, internet ect. has been fun also.

John

Posted by KF7VXA on February 15, 2013

survey
questions 2-4 and 6 sums it up.

Posted by W4HTH on December 6, 2012

The hobby is what YOU make it.
I have never thought about giving up on ham radio. Not even for a second. I absolutely love it! I have been into radio in one way or another since I was 8-year-old kid listening to shortwave, reading everything I could get my hands on about propagation, and teaching myself electronics theory. I was so fascinated by RF that I made it my career.

I have never lost the fascination and wonderment that I experienced in '67, when I made my first long-distance contact, and talked to central Florida from up on the Canadian border of Minnesota - using a 100 mW HT & a homemade dipole on 11m.

I eagerly embrace new technology & modes of operation, and I actively search for new things to learn in this hobby. After all - according to our slogan, we are supposed to advance the radio art - not shun new technology, ridicule others, and stubbornly cling to our old ways.

I enjoy designing antennas, experimenting with new modulation techniques, experimenting with various modes of propagation, shooting DX on 160-10, busting pileups, checking into nets, ragchewing with friends, handing out a few points in a contest from time-to-time, working deep-fringe on VHF & up, and passing the time on trips by talking to hams on the local repeaters. I really enjoy long ragchews with DX contacts, and I find plenty of opportunities to do so.

Sure, there are some bad ops out there. But there have been bad ops since the dawn of the spark-gap. It has absolutely nothing to do with testing requirements. Rather, it has everything to do with human nature. There are jerks in every large group. I choose to ignore them on the air. Of course, that's easier to do when your rig has an excellent receiver. :)

But the thing I enjoy most is teaching people about RF theory, antenna design, grounding, propagation, RF test & measurement, station design, and how to interpret RF test data. After all - Elmering is what it's really all about, as that is what keeps this hobby healthy.

To those who wring their hands & whine incessantly about how much better things were in the old days, and how new hams don't know anything - I think a bit of introspection is in order.

In the meantime, 160 is hopping. Time to make a few contacts!

Posted by N0NCO on November 26, 2012

Ups and downs for sure
Do I plan to give up on ham radio? Not at this time. Have I ever thought abt it? Sure many times. Are there things with the new generation of hams that bother me? Of course. Are there things that bother me with OLDER generation of hams? Of course.

I have had my ticket for 30 years and things have changed. Some for the good some for the bad. But that is no different than the rest of life.
Does it irk me when a new ham has no clue how to install a radio in a car? Sure. Or has no idea how to build a dipole antenna? Sure. Or install a PL-259 on coax<or even know what a PL-259 is> Sure.
BUT I didnt know that stuff when I started either.
I learned from other hams.
Now there are way more appliance operators nowdays but that is just the way it is.
As the older generation we need to help them along. They will get a handle on it or they will drop out of the hobby.
Its all what you make of it.
If a new ham only wants to talk on repeaters using an HT then thats ok. He may or may not realize that there is more out there. Or they will get bored and go find another hobby.

So am I going to quit ham radio? Naaaa..I will just ignore the bad parts and have fun with the good parts!!!

Dan/NØFPE

over....deeBeep

Posted by N0FPE on September 16, 2012

Hi AC0X...
You have me all confused here: you see, I'M the guilty party
who came up with the fact that "...Six of the seven choices
for answers are completely negative." Please enlighten us all
as to how anything POSITIVE might inspire someone to give
up on Ham radio! And no, I have absolutely no axes to grind
here, believe me: I've had my ticket now for 41+ years, and
have loved (and CONTINUE to love!) each & every minute of
it...

Posted by VE3CUI on September 16, 2012

6 out of 7?
Six of the seven choices for answers are completely negative... nah, the poster of this survey doesn't have an ax to grind at all ;)

Posted by AC0X on September 16, 2012

Assume the bars are lowered.
Let's assume the so-called bars are lowered. So what has been the effect today? Frankly I don't see any difference in the quality of radio operators today than, let us say, 23 years ago. 80 meters is the same as it has always been. Nothing has changed because of changes in testing requirements.

Limitations were not imposed, and anything you could do then, you can do now. New hams are occupying and preserving our spectrum space, and amateur radio is progressing, not degenerating into a cult of exclusively obsolete practices. Be glad that the torch is being passed on.

Posted by AI2IA on September 15, 2012

Anti-Elmers
With all the grumblers whining about new hams who don't know it all yet, and the kind of nasty treatment they get just for asking questions becuase they want to learn things, it's a wonder anyone joins this hobby anymore. Regardless of how high or low the bar of entry has become, it's not the fault of the new hams. They are simply taking the next legally mandatory step in their journey. Whine about lowered standards all you want, but don't blame the new hams and take it out on them because of that. Take it out on the older ones, and THEIR organizations, like their national radio clubs, who are the guilty one's in lobbying to get the bars lowered.

Posted by KG8QW on September 15, 2012

Turning it all around.
I always wanted a tower. Finally I saved up enough to get one, but then I thought about it. For my situation, it would be better to spend that wad of money another way.

So, I bought a used flag pole, the biggest one I could get. I put up an inverted vee with the flag pole as the apex. I spent the rest of the money on house repairs.

So, I don't have that tower, or the big yagi, but for me I did the better thing. The result is that I am happy.

You don't need people who agree with you. You don't even need to agree with yourself. What you need is people to disagree with you. They may seem like grouches, but they are more friendly to you than others who listen to your opinion and walk away. Ham radio is your big test. Don't fail that test. Make it work for you. You make it work for you. See?

Posted by AI2IA on September 14, 2012

It is what you make it.
Now that you have told us all about what the other hams do and do not do, how about telling us what you do to give back to ham radio for all the years you supposedly enjoyed ham radio. If you want to put up a tower and no one wants to help you, then you put it up yourself, get relatives and friends if you have any, to help, or bite the bullet and put out the cash to get it up. If you can't afford it, then you take up the challenge and put up a wire antenna, a homemade antenna, or a vertical antenna. However, with your whining attitude, you don't need an antenna. Your QSO would chase people away if you talk like you write. Look, you need ham radio more than most, but you have to get tough on yourself, take up challenges, and succeed at it, and then you will have a real accomplishment. It's a big ham world out there. You've got to stake out your part in it, and push to make it work out for you. Yes, you can!

Posted by AI2IA on September 14, 2012

New breed
I forgot to mention that with this new breed of ham,
they are not willing to help their fellow ham. In the
past when you mentioned tower party, people would
line up to help to get your tower up. I put this out to
the local ham club email list and received only one
response. "How much are you going to pay me to
help".

I will be leaving that ham club after 10+ years next
month.

The way that ham radio has changed motivates me to
sell all of my equipment and put the money into one
of my other hobbies.

I believe a lot of the changes are based on an aging
ham population and the newly minted hams with their
lower license standards dictates the level of people
entering the hobby.

If the new set of hams want to spend all of that money
to exchange call signs and 5/9, more power to them.

Posted by KB6QXM on September 13, 2012

Your view is a distortion
KB6QXM, yes indeed you are entitled to your opinions, and what sad and defeatist opinions they are!
I see your point of view and disagree with it, thoroughly. Nothing is dwindling except for a tiny minority of sad hams.
Successful hams are successful simply because they want to be successful and strive to be successful.
If you really love ham radio, then step out of the ice water that you are serving up. You need to circulate more, embrace a positive attitude, and become proactive, then you will be happy.

Posted by AI2IA on September 13, 2012

Different Landscape
Ham radio has changed completely since my original
interest back in 1971.

It used to mean something to be an amateur radio
operator. If you were in a group of people or a job
interview and mentioned that you were a ham, you
were automatically respected for being technically
saavy. Back before the lowering of the bar of the
amateur radio tests, you did not have polarization of
the ham community. The code versus no code crowd.
Before the politically correct inclusion crowd, you
earned your Novice license and if you did not upgrade
in 1 year, you lost your license and you found another
hobby. But the whiners won out. Politically correct
inclusion ARRL and FCC for the US.

With the ARRL watching their numbers dwindle, they
are pushing this contest/certificate agenda.

Now you have a bunch of rude hams that try to push
you off "their" frequency as you are not participating
in their ARRL sponsored contest.

I joined amateur radio to talk to people around the
world, learn their culture, build a friendship and chat
with them. I do not want to learn their name, call and
signal report.

Why would I spend thousands of dollars and a lot of
my time for that?

I have also seen newly licensed hams that cannot
solder on a PL259 onto a piece of coax. I had a newly
licensed ham actually ask me what a repeater is.

Is this good for the hobby? You decide.

I know ham radio has something for everyone, but
when you lower the standards on anything, you suffer
the results of that decision.

I know that my post might be flamed by pro ARRL
people, instant gradifaction people, contesters etc, but
I do not care. Freedom of speech as defined in the
constitution. I have a yahoo group that topics such as
this can be openly discussed.
Hamradioopenconversation.

Hope some of you see my point of view on what is
happening to ham radio and other facets of our
society.

73

Posted by KB6QXM on September 13, 2012

It is all there, & up to you
You all know that ham radio offers you not a broad, but really a vast range of activities. What you do with them is entirely up to you. There is great emphasis nowadays on "team" this and "team" that, and it is needed in emcomm and nets and clubs. However, independence is always there, too! Even in emergencies there are individual hams working with one another.
My point is that ham radio becomes whatever you make it for yourself. You overcome it all by what you do yourself with it. Always be greater than you seem.

Posted by AI2IA on September 12, 2012

1/4-century ham
I've been licensed for 25 years now and have seen lots of things happen in ham radio, both good and bad. There were a few times when I took a break from ham radio -- the first time was because I got just a little burned out and needed a break.

The second time was when I became unemployed and my only radio at the time, a 2-meter HT, broke, and I couldn't afford to replace it. The worst part about the second reason was the local hams wouldn't help me out at all, even after asking for help from the clubs of which I was a member, and I was off the air for three years because of it! I told the members what I thought about this at the last meeting I attended, and I never went back. Not one of them ever called me to offer their help. That was the only time I considered tearing up my ham ticket and leaving the hobby forever.

Fortunately, that never happened, I eventually found another job and another radio, and I found a new club to join.

And I'm still into ham radio, 15 years later!

Posted by N0JAA on September 11, 2012

Politics n repeaters
"How's my signal on the repeater bee deep ur 5x9 bee deep oh the humanity !!! Bee deep !!!"

W0IW;
And, this is different from the CONTEST and DX HUNTING exchanges how????? Different words, same impersonal drivel. That said, there are fun and interesting things to do on any and all of the bands; no need to knock an activity that YOU, personally are not interested in.
Tom

Posted by WB6DGN on September 11, 2012

Politics n repeaters
I gave up repeaters n local politics and went back to
straight hf contestings rag chewing and dx hunting been
a blast since staying off the local waterholes with there
Alligators all mouth and no ears And bs ....

How's my signal on the repeater bee deep ur 5x9 bee
deep oh the humanity !!! Bee deep !!!

Posted by W0IW on September 11, 2012

Never
I've had a ticket since 1978. I worked my way up to Extra a few years ago. I've lived in places that were just not conducive to operating. I've been off the air more than I've been on but I will never let my ticket expire. I will never quit looking for opportunities to operate. Today I live in another antenna restricted zone and so I have a stealth wire on the roof. It is barely 20 feet off the ground but I get out. I can only use it when my wife is not home because despite all my efforts I get into her computer. I don't get into mine or the TV or the phone but her laptop just loves picking up my signals. :)

Posted by WB2TQC on September 11, 2012

Never quit, but...
I wish the FCC would require auction sites like eBay to restrict sales of HAM equipment to licensed operators only. They can do it with guns and computer software, so why not HAM equipment? Every day, I hear kids or people who act like kids heckling people during QSO's, contests, etc. The circus up on 14.313 MHz is a classic example. The hecklers never use a call sign - just foul language and stupid remarks.

Posted by W3AFC on September 11, 2012

One retired ham
When I was working, I used to go on the air whenever I could get an opportunity. Often the timing was not ideal.

Now that I am retired, I have become very selective, and I go on the air only when I consider it the best of times.

Is this good? Well, maybe not, because sometimes I miss the challenge of slugging it out on a very busy band, or when QRN or QRM or both are really high.

Sometimes you appreciate things more when you have to make do with what you've got, because when you can do whatever you want, then some of the thrill goes away.

Posted by AI2IA on September 9, 2012

ups and downs
I will never quit completely, or I cannot fathom that. Just that activity has it's ups and downs. Plenty of downs. Suppose retirement will open the door to really wearing out the radios, but who knows. Only those who have retired. Well I do hear alot of them on the air.

Posted by W8AAZ on September 8, 2012

A life-long hobby
What other hobby is there that you can interact with other people 24/7 from the privacy of your own home? You don't have to pay to get in, wait for the right weather, don't need snow, don't need 'good' weather or a windless day, don't have to dress up or travel to enjoy it.

You don't even have to be mobile at all! You can be very disabled and be able to reach out to the world any time of day or night by one means or another and have the time of your life!

With the flip of a switch and turning a few knobs, you can have the world at your fingertips. You can be as involved as you like, spend as much or little money as you like and still have plenty of fun. For me there is nothing that comes even close.

Ham Radio has been a part of my life since I was a teen and learned Morse Code in high school. It was also my primary job for four years of service in the Marine Corps. It has been my choice for a hobby and means of enjoyment and creativity since 1965 and will continue to be until I am physically incapable of using the equipment.

Posted by AE7VT on September 8, 2012

Almost did quit
I got into ham because of a love that went back to the 70's even tho I did not pursue it at that time. I am so glad I went on and got into the hobby because it is the best and a whole lot of fun.

Posted by W9HQE on September 8, 2012

too much to learn
that's it, I cannot think that some day there
would be no new knowledge to pursuit.

Posted by LU2DFM on September 8, 2012

Done it all, but...
I've worked the DXCC Honor Roll from TWO
different DXCC countries. Worked 100+ squares
on VHF. Done satellites, EME and 160 m DXCC.
Done contesting from home and abroad. Been a
ham for 30+ years. Still LOVE the radios -
just can't find anything challenging to do
anymore. I'm still making 2 or 3 high speed
QSOs every night, but I have to admit I miss
the great buzz. It may come back, though...
http://www.hb9dsu.com

Posted by HB9DSU on September 7, 2012

Consider
Those few newer hams who are so quick to fault find with the older hams would do well to think about the legacy given to them by the ones who go before them in the amateur service.

The elmers, the amateur radio club officers, the emcomm instructors, those who serve and have served in the ARRL, the international bodies, the article writers, those in the business of support and supply to amateur radio, need I go on as to whom you all owe a debt of gratitude? To attempt to put down an entire group of more experienced and seasoned operators because of your annoyance with a few hardly will seem just to many. Real hams are well balanced and friendly individuals. Put your self in company with them, and be patient with the rest.

Posted by AI2IA on September 6, 2012

Nay Sayers
Amateur radio, has more really interesting
modes, equipment, technology, to learn and
experiment with then most hams will ever have
the time to try. But there always seems to be
a niche group of grumpy old farts, who
complain and whine, about the new hams, the
new modes, the new equipment. They are a very
depressing lonely, sad lot of individuals. I
feel bad for them. Every day, I learn new and
exciting ways to include new and not-so-new
technologies, and modes, to delve into.
Amateur Radio is what you make of it. Get up,
get out, get on the air, meet new hams, TRY
NEW THINGS. AND FOR GOODNESS SAKE, QUIT
WHINNING! And goodness sake, buy a new radio,
, and quit being so cheap! :-)

Posted by KE6ANM on September 6, 2012

Amateur Radio
Amateur Radio is way cool,ask anybody who's cool and not a nerd who thinks he or she knows it all! Joe Walsh is an amateur,he's cool. The James Gang RIDES AGAIN 73's Jimi Ryder KB3WGE.As for the glorified CB comment,There are a lot of LIDS out there who behave on the air than CB radio operators!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by KB3WGE on September 6, 2012

It's part of my life - seconded
It is difficult for me to guess where my life would have gone without this hobby. One only needs to pick up a ~1960 QST and read the same "letters to the editor" grumbling about new hams and the "lost" allure of the hobby, that part never changes. But with technology and "mystery" there is is always something new on the horizon to enjoy.

Posted by K1FT on September 4, 2012

It's always been expensive
Ham radio has always been expensive. When I got started over 30 years ago, I could barely afford the payments to Heathkit for my HX-1681/HR-1680 CW Twins. Through the years, I had different transceivers (used, of course) to play with. But as life's little emergencies creep up, I had to sell off equipment. Unfortunately, ham radio seems to have always been an "option" in life. Finally, two and half years ago, my health took a major turn for the worse and I had to sell everything in order to help keep from losing everything else. I was absolutely heartbroken and the stigma will probably prevent me from being active again anytime soon.

Posted by KA6SGT on September 4, 2012

Key
Just the key- I'll donate the rest- at the same time, I feel bad for you chasing DX only using a microphone- the pile ups are not ruder, just fuller of CB lingo-

Posted by N0AH on September 3, 2012

Keep Finding New Activities
I keep finding new things to do. I am now enjoying all of the
state QSO parties and even APRS. I went from two acres to an
apartment so my station is at work and unless I operate
portable I use the internet to use my radio thirty miles away.
Still having fun.

Posted by KE4KE on September 3, 2012

Wish I could pick 2
#2, and #7, both express my opinions!!
de Lee, K4LJP

Posted by K4LJP on September 2, 2012

Love this hobby
This hobby is timeless and fun, never boring,
lots of things to try. I thank every day in my
head my mentors who got me interested in it
over 40 years ago. And when a disaster, where
do people turn for help? Us. I remember helping
pass traffic during Hurricane Andrew. Many
other things too. Now the fun is getting
homebrew antennas to work on HF, listening to
HF when I am busy working and keeping up with
the new stuff. It rocks. It always will!

Posted by AA8XR on August 31, 2012

Funny thing is the thing that has kept up my interest in operating, is my interest in collecting vintage/tube equipment.

Posted by N1RND on August 30, 2012

radio never ends
There is no reason to stop. There is many different aspects to this hobby. I get bored and stop. Then days, weeks, month's later, I find a new reason to get back into it.
n1rnd

Posted by N1RND on August 30, 2012

The YL Still Doesn't Understand My Love of Radio ...I can always get a new
Was communication officer in the Marines and a friend gave me my Novice test in 1979. Radio was my job and my hobby for a while. Have had a station for DX'ing (318 countries), working satellite (built a helix on 2m. was impressive), played digital, worked contests. Now have 2 "Stealth" stations due to job location but I am still hooked on Ham Radio after 30+ years. What other hobby can morph into a new interest as life changes? The YL doesn't like it because she doesn't understand the fascination. Will get a new YL before I give up my radios!

Posted by KJ6ZH on August 30, 2012

enjoy the challange
I only have a base Lic here in AUS, but I home brew my antennas,and I will up grade the Lic in the future, Expensive , yes if you need Radios with all the latest bells&whistles.

My main set is a TS520S , with back ups of an FT77,& Icom 730.

The TS520S cost $350, FT77 $200 & the ICOM a Freebie.

I build my antennas , from what ever I can find /scrounge, and I'm currently building a LINEAR LOADED 40/80Mt Vertical.

Jeff
vk4fnrs

Posted by VK4FNRS on August 30, 2012

This is Life
Been interested in ham radio since I was 10.
Radios have changed, good people have passed
on, but turn on the radio, watch the glow of
the tubes and listen to the stations popping
out of the static from around the world. An
interest turned into an education and a
foundation for a job. Nothing captures my
attention like HAM RADIO!!

This is living!

Posted by N8RFI on August 29, 2012

This is Life
Been interested in ham radio since I was 10.
Radios have changed, good people have passed
on, but turn on the radio, watch the glow of
the tubes and listen to the stations popping
out of the static from around the world. An
interest turned into an education and a
foundation for a job. Nothing captures my
attention like HAM RADIO!!

This is living!

Posted by N8RFI on August 29, 2012

Many yrs of fun
I'm an old time extra and have been licensed for over 50 years. I've met some wonderful folks and have many delightful stories to remember. Yes there were a few not so nice ones, but the great folks far out number the lunes. It is what you make of it. I'm 66 and still climb my tower when necessary. 62 feet does seem higher than it used to be though. hi hi.
73 to all
Steve

Posted by KE4WI on August 29, 2012

HAM RADIO
I've been on HAM radio 2 meters for14 1/2 years, Finally getting ready for HF , got most of what I need. I am a DISABLED VETERAN on FIXED INCOME. Still need A good HF antenna, Would LOVE To have a DECENT YAESU FRG COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER (8800) (7700) (9600) Anyone got a deal for A disabled veteran? I have a Yaesu FT 747 trying to make a decent station. Contact KC8FSO

Posted by KC8FSO on August 27, 2012

Doesn't have to be expensive.
Unlike a computer, a radio isn't obsolete and unusable in five years. And we don't have to pay someone a monthly fee to get on the air.

Posted by KE0Z on August 27, 2012

Giving up on Ham radio
I doubt I will ever give it up. Though sick of antenna restrictions on base antennas!!!!! Then comes prices of equipment,especially radios! I think it will get a lot worse than it's ever been.

Posted by KC9SIP on August 26, 2012

The good and the bad...
Sure, I get fed-up with people's personal agendas sometimes. However, for the most part Hams are really great people.

The nice thing about this hobby is that there are so many different sub-interests to pursue.

If one gets tired of doing one thing - there plenty of other areas to keep you busy.

You also don't have to be part of a formal radio club to have fun. If you go solo, you can pretty much decide what you want to do.

Enjoy!

Posted by KJ4RHB on August 26, 2012

Practical pig.
As I point out to those who are considering ham radio, it does not have to be an expensive endeavor. You choose how much you want to spend on it. If you work at cost savings, you can do very well with used equipment, gifts from generous hams, and hams are usually generous people, and practical antennas.

Saving money is a good challenge in itself. You can go a long way simply by doing things yourself, and looking for bargains. Yes, ham radio can be very complicated, which is also good, but it certainly does not have to be so. Remember that a lot of stuff is really unnecessary. Take up the challenge. Be frugal, and be a happy ham.

Posted by AI2IA on August 25, 2012

A large investment
It will take a lifetime to re-coop this expensive hobby. However I would not have it any other way. To many friends and enjoyment to stop now. I have no complaints. 73-Dot-Dot


Poated August 25, 2012
KA5SNG

Posted by KA5SNG on August 24, 2012

How is amateur radio boring?
There are so many avenues to take with this hobby.. if you get disinterested in one area, try something else.

Posted by WB4M on August 24, 2012

No ham radio.
If I do not have my ham station, what will I
ticker. My GF. oh no ....much more expensive.

Posted by AB7MC on August 24, 2012

TROLL Question ?

Is this a Troll question ?

'Once a Ham always a Ham' even if current CC&R circumstances prevent one from actually putting out any 'meaningful ' RF for a period.

KH6/G3SEA

Posted by G3SEA on August 23, 2012

Daily Activity
Without radio who would I talk to, the dog, the wife, OMG?

Posted by AI7RR on August 23, 2012

Daily Activity
Without radio who would I talk to, the dog, the wife, OMG?

Posted by AI7RR on August 23, 2012

Always interesting
I've been a ham this time for about 25 years, had a novice ticket some 40 years ago and let it expire, bad move but was young. I've tried ALMOST everything and I say almost because it seems there's always something else to try new or old. It has to be the most interesting and challenging hobby around for someone that likes to tinker with electronics etc. It becomes a part of your life, a real good part.

Posted by N1FDX on August 23, 2012

It's Like An Elevator: "Ups" & "Downs"...!
I've been a Ham for 41 years now, & had aspirations of
being one years before it actually happened. The past
decades have seen my interests in particular niches of the
hobby ebb & rise, just like the tide: but y'know what? No
matter how dispirited I might have become with the hobby
over some "bad" facet that I may have encountered,
something new, exciting, & invigorating ALWAYS arrived
on the scene to dispel any negativity! Such is Amateur
radio: something for everyone, something for every
season of the year, something for each & every mood,
good OR bad...something that acts just like a tonic to get
one back in the groove again...!

Posted by VE3CUI on August 23, 2012

Survey
One year ago I upgraded to DV mode using DStar. Working
reflectors and repeaters all over the world meeting
interesting people.

Posted by W2UIS on August 22, 2012

Quit?
I've seen a LOT of changes over the years that I've been a ham, (some good, some bad) I just GOTTA see what happens next! (call it a morbid curiosity!)

Posted by WD8OQX on August 22, 2012

ONE KNOB - ONE FUNCTION!
I whole heartily agree with that statement!

Posted by K6MMS on August 22, 2012

Guess I'll always have my ticket.
Just one choice made it tough, otherwise I could have picked three; #2, #4 and can't pass on #5.

After nearly fifty three years in the ranks I imagine I'll keep renewing every evolution not that there are many left for me.

Posted by K0CBA on August 22, 2012

It's what you make it.
Amateur radio can be as simple or complex as you, yourself, wish to make it.
You can still build a simple crystal radio receiver. Most CW transmitter kits are very easy to build. MFJ and others have many simple devices to build or to purchase that offer considerable fun and interest.
Just be yourself. You can operate anyway you want. It does not have to be contests, or Morse Code, or PSK31, or fancy antennas. Maybe as you develop a desire to go further, you might. Mainly, be yourself and don't be concerned about what others think or do with it. If it makes you happy, just do things that way. Take pride in your ham license, be it Technician, General, or Amateur Extra Class. You worked for it, and it is yours.

Posted by AI2IA on August 22, 2012

I want a different answer
There isn't much about it that's simple. I like doing simple, pleasureful things. I like to build QRP radios and use them. But to be a "real" QRPer, you're expected to build and own a dozen tuners, you have to know by heart that a Z-match does not mean "impedance match" (it's a circuit), remember what a BLT is...because all that stuff is "required" in the on-air QSO with another QRPer.

DX? The prevlance of the DX clusters means you cannot really be a DXer with a modest station any more. The DX gets pounced on after the first CQ as everbody "points and clicks".

Radios. Performance better than ever. User interface harder than ever. One knob, one function, OK? Each time I push that button, it does the same thing!

It's the complexity that makes me weary.

- k

Posted by KASSY on August 21, 2012

Too new to quit!
Took me over 30 years to finally decide to get
my ticket and I went straight for General. Not
a lot of time to devote to it still but every
minute I'm working at it is fun. I guess if it
weren't challenging then I it would be CB.

Posted by KC9WIP on August 21, 2012

It's part of my life.
I have been a radio operator for over fifty years. More importantly, radio waves and electronics have been a part of my thinking for over sixty-two years. It was when I was in high school many years ago that I became fascinated with two ideas: First the mystery of invisible radio waves, and secondly, that for the most part electronic communication devices have just about no moving parts when they are operating. For me this resulted in a career, military radio service, and a life-long hobby. I am surrounded by my own antennas. Need I say more?

Posted by AI2IA on August 21, 2012

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