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What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
  Posted: Jun 26, 2014   (652 votes, 49 comments) by NW1S

  Provide training for better use in local CERT teams
  Appeal to more preppers and homesteaders
  Outreach to high school science students
  Outreach in high-tech locales like Silicon Valley, Silicon Gultch, Silicon Spudland, Silicon Rainforest, etc
  Outreach to shut-ins and retirement communities
  Appeal to truckers and other road-warriors who want more than "smokey reports" on CB radio
    (652 votes, 49 comments)

Survey Results
Provide training for better use in local CERT teams 5% (34)
Appeal to more preppers and homesteaders 10% (64)
Outreach to high school science students 71% (461)
Outreach in high-tech locales like Silicon Valley, Silicon Gultch, Silicon Spudland, Silicon Rainforest, etc 4% (24)
Outreach to shut-ins and retirement communities 6% (41)
Appeal to truckers and other road-warriors who want more than "smokey reports" on CB radio 4% (28)

Survey Comments
Expanding Ham Radio
Has PSA Commercials ever been done? 30 second
or 1 minute spots all with different subjects
that highlight what we do in Emergencies
around the world both at home & abroad.I'd
steer away from Contesting & Nets topics
since I think those would be a negative
aspect to so many.I still have people all of
the time ask me what Amateur Radio is.Even
had a State Wildlife Officer ask me what it
was when he read Amateur Radio on my license
plate on my vehicle.So many who know nothing
about our hobby or what we can do when needed
when cell phones,land lines,TV,& radio all
fail we will still be going strong even off
of the power grid & soon we could be the only
ones getting information because of the
possibility of the collapse of world
economies. Preppers have already caught on so
who will be next?

Posted by W4KVW on July 19, 2014

Experimenting - Electronics
Well, I don't live in the US, but from German perspective amateur radio in the US seems to be booming..:-)
In our club we see that youngsters are still very much attracted by electronics and like to build kits and all related stuff. We tried to use this and now have about 6-10 girls and boys (age 1-15) coming to our club to either take old electronic gear apart (which they really like much!) or solder electronic kits, program a robot and so on. We try to sneak amateur radio in via the back door, so to say. :-) Not all of them will get a license, but some, so what? At least their parents get to know of ham radio.

Often you hear from OT: Well, since cellular phones and internet is there, nobody wants to do ham radio... This is bullshit (sorry). The youth is using their smartphones like we use our watch, its nothing exciting. But talking to someone far away or getting a circuit to function still is! Try it.

Posted by DF2OF on July 16, 2014

ARRL
ARRL does a great job of publicizing the hobby and communicating with its members. I wish I could talk to them about it. Where they are lacking is that they are confusing marketing with recruiting. Recruiting (whether an employee or a new ham) is a very distinct thing with different metrics, different strategies and different skills. We have plenty of cheerleaders and marketers in Ham Radio. We have very poorly trained (if trained at all) recruiters.

Posted by KC7MF on July 15, 2014

recruiting
I recently found out a small group of veterans
wanted to do something for the community. Some
are handicapped with war injuries. They started
a free computer training program consisting of
hands on instruction. No pressure on students,
take your time. Finally I spoke with one of the
instructors and told him we need operators to
man the command post for ARES. His ears perked
up and I intend to see if he will contact
others and we'll help them get their licenses.

Posted by W8IFI on July 13, 2014

more publicity
K3CXG is right.Ham radio should be promoted to all! I noticed one comment saying that schools are too busy to encourage such things. The best way would be demos for the young people to see how much fun it can be to "talkacross" the world. Demographics could be skewed a little lower that's for sure! Best y'all! Tom KB3ZAA

Posted by KB3ZAA on July 11, 2014

Shout it Out!
One word: exposure. ARRL spends too much money and time promoting ham radio to hams. That's just preaching to the choir. To borrow a phrase from the Doobie Brothers, they should be "taking it to the streets." Tell the general public - men, women, young, old, ethnicities. When was the last time you saw a 30-second spot on TV for ham radio? I know advertising is expensive, but ARRL should reprogam their efforts to get the word out to the public at large. Promoting within the hobby is self-defeating. Not a sermon, just a thought. Your mileage may vary.

Posted by K3CXG on July 11, 2014

For K7AAT and others
No sweat on the criticsm. This is like any other forum; "If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen. We're cookin' in here!"
As such, you folks have cooked up some better ideas than mine (which is what I had in mind). Keep it rolling! Further...
Carnagie-Mellon Prof Randy Pautch gave me an idea from his Alice project: how could Amateur Radio appeal outside the usual science realms and into the non-science (even liberal arts) realms? There are weekly 2-meter nets for sportsmen and hunters. Any other special interests that might use a net of their own? Any YLs have ideas beyond the usual male viewpoints?

Posted by NW1S on July 9, 2014

Untapped Talent
Wounded Warriors...amateur radio is right up their alley. I previously worked for a prosthetics and orthopaedics company that gave mobility back to a great many of our returning soldiers that suffered from roadside bombs, etc. There is nothing more satisfying than giving back to those that served their country in combat and paid a dear price. Radio would give those warriors who are interested something enjoyable to engage in while on the road to recovery. So, contact your local Wounded Warriors chapter and see if you or your club could be of assistance.

Posted by KF5TJX on July 9, 2014

For K7AAT and others
No sweat on the criticsm. This is like any other forum; "If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen. We're cookin' in here!"
As such, you folks have cooked up some better ideas than mine (which is what I had in mind). Keep it rolling! Further...
Carnagie-Mellon Prof Randy Pautch gave me an idea from his Alice project: how could Amateur Radio appeal outside the usual science realms and into the non-science (even liberal arts) realms? There are weekly 2-meter nets for sportsmen and hunters. Any other special interests that might use a net of their own? Any YLs have ideas beyond the usual male viewpoints?

Posted by NW1S on July 8, 2014

For K7AAT and others
No sweat on the criticsm. This is like any other forum; "If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen. We're cookin' in here!"
As such, you folks have cooked up some better ideas than mine (which is what I had in mind). Keep it rolling! Further...
Carnagie-Mellon Prof Randy Pautch gave me an idea from his Alice project: how could Amateur Radio appeal outside the usual science realms and into the non-science (even liberal arts) realms? There are weekly 2-meter nets for sportsmen and hunters. Any other special interests that might use a net of their own? Any YLs have ideas beyond the usual male viewpoints?

Posted by NW1S on July 8, 2014

For K7AAT and others
No sweat on the criticsm. This is like any other forum; "If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen. We're cookin' in here!"
As such, you folks have cooked up some better ideas than mine (which is what I had in mind). Keep it rolling! Further...
Carnagie-Mellon Prof Randy Pautch gave me an idea from his Alice project: how could Amateur Radio appeal outside the usual science realms and into the non-science (even liberal arts) realms? There are weekly 2-meter nets for sportsmen and hunters. Any other special interests that might use a net of their own? Any YLs have ideas beyond the usual male viewpoints?

Posted by NW1S on July 8, 2014

Where is leadership
For two decades I've pushed for ARRL or local HAM Clubs to create an 'adopt-a-school' program. Or for local HAM clubs to independently work with their own local school system to create a school Aux HAM club shack with HAM retiree's to Elmer/teach kids radio/electronics. What better way to spawn their interest in electronics, communications, HAMdom with all the $$$ limits put upon our schools? Plus it's an E-Comm alternate for the school/kids!

The key here is to work with the school system and since 9/11, work within the school system restrictions & security.

Why an Aux HAM shack - keeps control of the radio property and maintenance responsibility with the club - negating most all cost burden to school budgets. The only items owned (via donations) by the schools is the antenna mounts/masts since by nature they are connected to the buildings.

It is not an easy effort but the rewards are greater than most will ever know.

My interest in electronics-communications started in Jr High school with a science teacher creating a HAM club and we built/OP'ed a HW-16, that lead to my Boy Scout Radio merit badge. 3yrs later in High School we had a SSB/CW Collins Shack, when I got my Novice license, that took me into the USN Adv Electronics program as a Fire Control Tech/Instructor later into aerospace and night schooling to MS-EET to now being a dissertation away from PhD.

Never think youthful influences do not have an affect.

Posted by N6JSX on July 8, 2014

Local or regional limits
It is a mistake to presume that local statistical experience in regard to ham operator characteristics may be applied as sweeping generalizations.
As an example, even in a locale where a university is situated not far from a retirement community in Florida, there is a large number of digital ham operators surrounded by traditional old time hams. The more you expand your geography, the more variety you experience. Beware of making generalizations.

Posted by AI2IA on July 8, 2014

A Greying Hobby---At Least In North America
Practically 99.9% of the QSOs that I make with U.S.A.- and
Canadian-based Hams are with Amateurs that are OLDER
than my 62 years here...it is actually somewhat refreshing
to work somebody who might be in their 50's---QSOs
with younger Amateurs are well-nigh non-occuring
here...

Odd, though, that this "rule" does NOT hold fast when
working DX stations.

Why is that...? Why does Ham radio seem to hold such a
greater appeal to foreigners, as opposed to domestic
would-be Amateurs...?

Posted by VE3CUI on July 7, 2014

ARRL To Better Radio
Put "Term Limits" on all the reps in the ARRL. ALL people have their strong and weak points. In order to best serve the TOTAL needs of the people, you need well rounded leadership. Which is best done by new leaders every few years. Otherwise you have the same things falling by the wayside way too long.

Posted by N4VNV on July 7, 2014

The Original Social Media
I was off the air for 13 years until last July when I got the
urge to put up my old vertical and fire up my TS-520 that
I bought new 40 years ago. Didn't know what to expect
having been "away" for so long. I was very pleased (and
admittedly somewhat surprised) to hear so much
activity, and to read how much ham radio is still alive
and well! I decided to really jump back in and got a
brand new rig ... a Kenwood TS-590 and associated
gear. Sure glad I did. And I just upgraded to Extra class.
This venerable hobby has served so many throughout
its long history, and it deserves to be promoted and
passed on by whatever means practical.

After all, Ham Radio is the original social media.

Posted by KU4NY on July 5, 2014

Easy targets
The reason everyone wants to attract high school students and boy scouts is that they are all together in one place. They are easy to find. The problem is that this is where everyone else is looking too. Chess club, debate club, stagecraft.......

There is an old saying. "if it isn't someone's job, it isn't going to get done." One key to recruiting, of course is our clubs. The key in the club is to put people to work. My local club has never asked me to do anything. So if I drift away....who will notice? If we want young people involved then we have to have events that appeal to them. Geocaching, fox hunts, high-tech exploration, things where they can get out and move around. And let the new and/or younger hams run the events. Not just the usual one-by-two stalwarts hogging the equipment and doing the work.

News flash. School and working age new hams can't go to breakfast on Wednesday at 9 AM. They don't want to go to an ice-cream social. But let them operate a special event station from a fun location and they will be all over it. Did you note the part about "Let them operate"? Not try it for five minutes and hand it back to the guy with gray hair but actually run the event as equals.

For field day this year I stopped by while about five people were setting up. I thought I might be able to help. They looked at me like I had something odd on my forehead. No one so much as said hi. The announcement at the previous meeting amounted to "field day is this weekend. Come by if you want." No enthusiasm, no big welcome, no operating schedule...nothing. And this is a big club.

Every club should have a membership person. This person's charter should not just be shaking every new hand. It should be putting new people to work right away. Even before they are licensed, they can learn by doing. Every person whose hand I am holding has limited extra class privileges....right?

We need to let people talk on our radios. Have them to the house and put them on the air. And every one of us who hears a young person or visitor on the air should make a special effort to welcome them and talk to them a bit. Every visitor to our clubs should get a handshake from everyone and a business card should they have questions.

You don't have to recruit new hams. You can pound out the contest stuff and for all intent and purpose never really speak to anyone. But for those of us who see ham radio as an important emergency communication method or a wonderful and interesting social media opportunity, it is our job to spread the word.

Posted by KC7MF on July 5, 2014

Resuscitation!
With a large percentage of hams over 50 years old, we can look for the number of US hams to decrease markedly over the next 30 years. It seems like since cellular service and Internet access became widespread 20 years ago we have had serious problems attracting young people to the hobby. Go to any ham club meeting or hamfest and see all the gray hair and electric mobility, or just take a look at the ages of those you meet on the HF bands (via the Internet, of course).

Our services have become mostly extraneous, at best secondary for the most part. The technical side of radio is still there, but the good old days of easily converting a junk TV to a transmitter are gone with the likes of Lew McCoy.

We really need to find some strong incentive for teens to take up ham radio, but I've not a clue what that might be.

Posted by K4IQT on July 5, 2014

Get off your duff!
I taught "Radio Merit Badge" at a Boy Scout Winter camp. I had 21 students. Of those 21 approximately 12 slept through the whole class (4 days for an hr a day), 10 got their merit badge. Of those ten two went on to get their Ham Ticket. One of those formed a Youth Ham club (now defunct) before he left for College. I think this about equals the national percentage of folks that are exposed and then get into radio.

The way to get more people into Ham Radio is to get them into Ham radio! Expose them to it. Yes it's hard in this world of instant communication, but if you can get them interested and they finally experience that "magic moment" of making that first rare DX contact, you have them hooked for life.

You also need to show them that if a major incident (storm, grid down, SHTF etc) that you cell phone will only work for a day or so and then they will be so crowded that you won't get a call through. That happened with the last hurricane we had here. You couldn't make a phone call for days and Law Enforcement and Emergency workers had priority, their calls would go through in front of all others.

The way to increase our ranks is to get more people exposed to Radio and it's benefits.

AD5TD

Posted by AD5TD on July 5, 2014

What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
With more than 710000 licensed US Amateur radio operators
why is there a need to expand our ranks?

Posted by W2UIS on July 5, 2014

How to improve Ham Radio Today
NO QUESTIONS ON CONTEST STATIONS.

Ham Radio today has become a "plug-n-play" hobby. To make matters worse the 30 second QSO seems to be the norm with no real talk about radio itself.

If you are not interested in contests then avoid having a chat on weekends. The amount of contests on weekends is gone beyond a joke. If you are operating QRP/portable on a weekend, forget it. The contest operators thread all over you with total abandonment, it is as if they have a god given right to trample on the QRP stations (and others).

Why not confine contest stations to a particular segment of the band where they can reach a their climax sooner and get their excitement over-with.

Splatterville is alive and well and can be heard on weekends.

Posted by EI6DP on July 4, 2014

Missing answer
Best answer? Outreach. To all. Period.

Posted by K1CJS on July 3, 2014

You may regret it.
"As such, I believe it is no longer relevant to emphasize the communication aspect of amateur radio."

There may come a time when you and others may regret that you did not consider the emergency communication aspects of the amateur radio service seriously.

".... and they believed that all was well, and in one moment they were gone without warning."

Posted by AI2IA on July 3, 2014

Choose the right audiance
With advancement of technology, the ability to talk with someone far away is no longer special. Today, I can get a sat
phone that fits into my pocket, and have phone connection almost anywhere in the world. If I want to chat with a random
stranger, that too is not difficult with the internet. If I need a short distance comm, I can pick up a FRS radio from the local
big box store. As such, I believe it is no longer relevant to emphasize the communication aspect of amateur radio.

Instead, I believe the hobby should be pitched towards those interested in technology and electronics, as an avenue of
discovering and expanding their interests. There are builders events for raspberry pi and arduino, reach out to them. Have a
strong presence at engineering schools and vocational schools. I believe reaching out to this kind of population would yield
better response than mass marketing the hobby.

Posted by N8YQX on July 3, 2014

Old Mans Hobby. Hihi
What can i say ? I was first a young Ham in the 60s was great fun and helped start a HS STation, I was not just a typical Geek either i liked being different and yet had a blast. At that time Hams complained at the numbers, now i see so many on the bands i enjoy , i do not care if some leave ! I hear more rude S.O.Bs than ever ! hihi but true! The Hobby will change , add Video Data over the bands, have the young'ins try Ham Speed Dating and see what happens ! We have seen what so many interesting you tube users have done, use similar Tech. available if you want numbers - for me i could care less how many members - who benefits from more surely not most of us ! hihi. Think about it . 73s, W5heh yah the Hillbilly Ham

Posted by W5HEH on July 2, 2014

For NW1S
Yes, I criticized the answers provided for this excellent question by NW1S. Perhaps I was hasty in my criticism. In retrospect I see where he was heading, but the limited answer pool, and the few tongue-in cheek answers provided were just too limited in scope to be realistic. My suggestion, which works for our local club in our tiny community, is simply publicity, publicity, publicity. Our club is great about getting the word out about its existence, it's public service (ARES), and the hobby in general. We hold a class or two each year...it is publicized heavily. We have several events, Field Day, Wing's and Wheels at the local airport, International Lighthouse & Lightship weekend, and numerous other events which are well publicized and the public is invited to all. We even have the local radio station air some of the free ARRL Public Information Ads for ham radio. All in All, it is this heavy publicity that has drawn interest to our club and provided new ham licensees for the club every year.

Posted by K7AAT on July 2, 2014

Again and again
If happy hams don't put in their positive comments, this thread will just become one more nesting ground for the usual gloom and doom hams.
Ham radio doesn't need a fix. It needs to extend invitations.

Posted by AI2IA on July 2, 2014

Well, looking on the bright side after listing all the negatives that are obvious. We can still see a lot of people riding and employing horses, 100+ years after the automobile, and people still like sailing, 150 years after the steam ship. I am holding my old 2M rigs for that future day when repeater nostalgia arrives and activity picks up!

Posted by W8AAZ on July 2, 2014

Appeal to road warriors and truckers that want more than CB? Dunno, they already use ten meter radios and whatever else to expand beyond regular CB, with no steenkin' license required. Hard sell?

Posted by W8AAZ on July 2, 2014

What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
I agree with K9ZF, Dan. All the choices are correct and should be used to advance the hobby. More Public Relations is needed to get the word out. I heard it a few time at work, that Ham is dead, but proved the soth-sayers wrong. They were surprised that its alive and well. I recruited a few new hams along the way.

Posted by KI4OYV on July 1, 2014

All of the above...
First, enough of the gloom and doom. Ham
radio is alive and well... I've been hearing
the same "the hobby is dying" chicken little
story for the past 22 years.

Adding new people is a great thing. Try
every avenue that might reach new people.

We need more Elmers. What have you done to
help the hobby lately?

73
Dan

--
K9ZF
Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Clark County
Indiana. EM78el
The once and future K9ZF /R no budget Rover
***QRP-l #1269
Check out the Rover Resource Page at:
<http://www.qsl.net/n9rla>
List Administrator for: InHam+grid-loc+ham-
books
Ask me how to join the Indiana Ham Mailing
list

Posted by K9ZF on July 1, 2014

What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
Outreach programs with the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. While school districts might not have time or inclination to support a Ham Club within schools, the scouting programs for boys and girls would be much more receptive. Learning valuable skill sets and community service is what scouting is all about.

Posted by KD0TLN on July 1, 2014

More than one good answer
Field Day - Yes!
High School students - Yes!
Local media attention to events other than Field day - Yes!

Not all prospective Hams have the same interests. One club I know of - where it is, I will not say - encourages interested ordinary people to attend meetings - and tells these people they have to become involved in CERT if they want to attend the offered license classes. Many possible hams just leave - They just drove away people who have an interest in the technical / experimentation aspect forever!

So many clubs and even individual Elmers focus so narrowly - "There's only one 'real' kind of Ham Radio" that I bet half of the people who could become Hams flee screaming.

Posted by K7NG on July 1, 2014

What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
Interesting points of view by everyone. I don't think the
experience of making a contact with someone over the air
today is as exciting as it was for me in 1964.

Communication technology is more advanced today than
it was in the 60's. Facebook and Twitter is fun with
millions to share ideas with.

Is it really so important to get new people into amateur
radio? As for myself I'm getting bored making contacts on
40 meters except when a good rag chew round table gets
rolling in the evening and we talk about something other
than radio.

Then the cost equipment is now past the $1000 point for
a decent new station. I just sent my 857D in for repairs
instead of purchasing a new transceiver.

Three years ago I purchased DStar equipment and have
discovered a new mode of operations which has renewed
amateur radio for me.

I now wonder at my age how much longer I will be making
contacts on the radio? The excitement isn't there for me
any longer.

I still love radio and making contacts with fellow hams and
will continue until the day I die. Amateur radio will
continue in some capacity in the future, it will only be
different from what we are accustomed.

Posted by W2UIS on June 30, 2014

Many approaches
There are many approaches we can take to recruit folks into ham radio, not that there is an urgent need or the amateur radio service will disappear, not at all.
Still, recruiting high school students could give them a big career boost, not just in radio or even electronics in general. One other very effective method is the bumper sticker "When all else fails ....." I have gotten good results with that one. People at work didn't seem too interested until I drove in with that bumper sticker. I then got two employees as far as tech class license, and these were guys that did not even work in my section. All sorts of things work, even chance conversations. It is like spreading happiness.

Posted by AI2IA on June 30, 2014

My Sons highschool has a complete station and
two active HAMs as advisors. At the start of
the year four or five kids showed up. Each of
them invited others but as my son says they
didn't care. My son was the only one to
license. With this experience and others I
believe we are wasting our time trying to
target highschool students or any group. We
need to appeal to a large general audience
via facebook etc. We need to make sure that
we point out the benefits of HR to people
from other hobbies like fishing four wheeling
etc. In other words we need to get out of the
shack and be visable

Posted by K7EDL on June 30, 2014

All walks of life
Amateur radio is of interest to all sorts of people If you look around, we have the young, the old, the disabled, sportsmen, the community minded, boaters, computer enthusiasts, professionals, and do it yourself people. We have a cross section of everyone in the population.

Cost is not a factor, either. There is used gear, friends and relatives, budget gear, and people who are determined, including youth, know how to save and budget and earn what they want.

All it takes is the will to do it.

Posted by AI2IA on June 30, 2014

Older persons hobby
I'm a member of the Harley's Owners Group
(HOG), at a meeting a few weeks ago someone
asked why there aren't any younger members?
The answer, they can't afford the bikes. I'm
NOT saying ham radio is expensive but what I
AM saying is life happens. Twenty years ago
when my children were young their needs took
priority over hobbies, as we grow older the
kids move out and there is money for hobbies
like motorcycles and ham radios.

Why do people keep saying the hobby is dying
when licensing is at an all time high? The
hobby isn't dying, it's waiting for middle
age.

Posted by N7KFD on June 29, 2014

None of the Above
It's a dying hobby that's passé to young people. Just
enjoy it and stop fighting the inevitable.

Posted by WA5VGO on June 29, 2014

What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
Reaching out to high school science students won't work.
School administrators and teachers are too busy trying to
implement common core standards to spend time with
amateur radio. I tried to introduce amateur radio to my
students only to have my proposals denied by the district. A
teacher cannot start a club without approval of the school
board. The only way to reach high school students is off
campus with the help of local hams.

Posted by W2UIS on June 29, 2014

What can be done to further Amateur Radio?
Reaching out to high school science students won't work.
School administrators and teachers are too busy trying to
implement common core standards to spend time with
amateur radio. I tried to introduce amateur radio to my
students only to have my proposals denied by the district. A
teacher cannot start a club without approval of the school
board. The only way to reach high school students is off
campus with the help of local hams.

Posted by W2UIS on June 29, 2014

Stupid answers?
Yup, these are my answers and they are from my experience. I'm a former CB'er, high-tech engineer in Portland with terac.org, certified CERT working with shut-ins and retirees, prepper-homesteader friendly, and picked up Ham radio as a school kid. I'll be teaching a Ham Tech class shortly. You don't like my answers? POST YOUR OWN! But let's keep the ideas rolling! Even in these days of Twitter, Facebook and smartphones, Amateur Radio unique, useful, horribly advertised and misunderstood by the masses. MSM doesn't give a ratza$$ so its up to us to promote it. Gimme some more ideas!

Posted by NW1S on June 28, 2014

Agree with K7AAT
Good question, lousy answers. Three is the
only logical one that would bear any fruit.

Posted by WB4M on June 28, 2014

This is an obvious case to petition the FCC
for reacquisition of the 11 meter band into
the Amateur service. With of course the
grandfathering of any and all license classes
to increase the "numbers" of active hams.
Truckers, freebanders, and even the most
antagonistic would be welcome into the newer
more friendly Amateur service.

Tongue in cheek of course. More
establishment of high school clubs with
advisers who are excited about young people
getting interested. We're so worried about
"numbers" increasing.

What do the Japanese do?

Posted by HAMMYGUY on June 28, 2014

My best choice
I considered outreach to folks in high tech locales and outreach to high school science students. After thought, I decided for high school science students.

However, I would extend it to all high school students, because they could all benefit from it, and ham radio could benefit from young people with their minds fixed on other careers.

Looking back, as a high school science student I was fascinated by the fact that for the most part radio communication used little or no moving parts. This was it. I have spent my entire post high school life in radio communications, amateur, commercial, and military. In retirement, my antennas and gear are right here with me.

It took only one moment of thought in a high school physics class to put me on a life long path with absolutely no regrets.
de Ray, ai2ia
end of message

Posted by AI2IA on June 27, 2014

OBE
The social aspects of Amateur Radio have long ago been taken over by "Social Media" platforms. The technical aspects, well let's just say, we are not leading edge but more blunt edge. As far as "news", a cat stuck in a tree (have you ever seen a cat skeleton in a tree) has a better chance of coverage.

Posted by KG4RUL on June 27, 2014

Many Aspects of Hobby
The ham community needs to make the public aware of the many aspects to our hobby. Not just ARES/RACES and public service. I am not into things in to above sentence, but enjoy experimentation, and rag chewing. Now days there is over emphasis on ARES/RACES and public service. The first four questions are good. The hams bands don't need to be turned into another Citizens Band service.

Posted by KE0XQ on June 27, 2014

PR Enhancement?
I think the ham community does a poor job of tooting it's own horn when the opportunity is available. This weekend we have one of, if not the, BIGGEST Event that we all try to participate in, Field Day, 2014. There should be a story about this event on every local TV station and newspaper about what Field Day is. It should also be on the ABC/NBC/CBS Nightly News b/c this is a National/International event. What better way to perk up interest and to show WHAT we do and how you can become part of this great service community. THAT is what I think!

Posted by KA4AQM on June 27, 2014

Poor Choices

It seems to me that this is an excellent question with rather poor choices offered. I see either the first or third would be the only realistic categories.

Posted by K7AAT on June 26, 2014

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