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W4ZV Sets New 80-Meter World Record -- Again!

Created by The Beacon Tribune on 2005-01-18

Radio Amateur William Tippett, W4ZV, Sets New 80-Meter World Record - Again! 20 Million Miles per Watt:

January 17, 2005 - New London, NC

A radio signal with 2000 times less power than it takes to light a digit on an alarm clock, was successfully received by William Tippett of New London, NC. Barely two weeks since setting his last world record on the 80 meter radio band, Tippett, Amateur radio operator W4ZV, correctly copied Morse code word GOLD from the N2XE beacon transmitting with a peak carrier power of 27 millionths of a watt. Tippett confirmed reception of the beacon at 1153Z, January 17, 2005. The precise distance between the two stations is 546.8 miles, establishing Tippett's record reception at 20,221,893 miles per watt. Tippett used a Ten Tec Orion Transceiver with a 1000 foot Beverage antenna (named after Dr. Harold Beverage who invented it in the 1920s).

The N2XE beacon (a continuously transmitting signal with a repeating message) transmits from a Ten Tec Argonaut V radio using an 80 meter off-center fed dipole, 45 feet AGL (above ground level). The beacon peak carrier output was measured using an Agilent 8563EC Spectrum Analyzer at 27.04 uW (27 millionths of a watt). The power output was independently measured and verified by Thomas Cowell, KC4YJU, of Poughkeepsie, NY.

Unlike satellite radio transmissions, the 80 meter signal had to "go around the corner" bouncing off the ionosphere to make the trip from New York to North Carolina. The 80 meter band makes low signal detection difficult due to much higher natural noise than higher frequency bands. It is estimated that the Morse code signal Tippett decoded was 6 dB (decibels) below the noise floor. It is estimated that the limit of the human ear and brain is 10 dB below noise level.

Both the transmitter and receiver are designed and manufactured by Ten Tec Incorporated, Sevierville, TN, in the foothills of the Great Smokey Mountains. Ten Tec has a 36 year history of manufacturing exceptional radio equipment for commercial, government and amateur use.

The N2XE Beacon Project was started in December, 2004 by Paul Stroud, AA4XX, Raleigh, NC and John Ceccherelli, N2XE, Wappingers Falls, NY with the goal of having a little fun and to go where no diminutive signal has gone before. The beacon transmits a unique code word each evening. Receiving stations are required to correctly copy the code word in their report. The word is published the following morning. Beacon times and frequencies are posted daily on the QRP-L reflector http://www.kkn.net/archives/html/QRP-L. Tests will continue on 160, 80 and 40 meters through the end of February 2005.

William Tippett, W4ZV, is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (retired) for Exide Electronics in Raleigh, NC. btippett@alum.mit.edu John Ceccherelli, N2XE, is a Senior Engineer at IBM in Hopewell Junction, NY n2xe@arrl.net

The Beacon Tribune
Poughkeepsie, NY

KE4MOB 2005-01-19
RE: W4ZV Sets New 80-Meter World Record -- Again!
"I would like to see them make a attempt at 27nW. This is the signal level that has been advertised as the level used by BPL systems."

Ken...turn your logic around and we can see the real danger. If this is really the level advertised by BPL systems, then we know that 27 nW can propagate at least 500 miles. Now we all know that BPL will probably radiate higher ERP than that...so what does that mean??
AE1X 2005-01-19
W4ZV Sets New 80-Meter World Record -- Again!
Congradulations! This is what amateur radio is all about.

This should be used to show that this type of experiementation by our community would be rendered useless by BPL. This Commission has already indicated that they feel experimental amateur work is a significant reason for our very existence.

I would like to see them make a attempt at 27nW. This is the signal level that has been advertised as the level used by BPL systems.

Ken