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[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

How to Construct a Portable Station

Charles (KC8VWM) on June 20, 2009
View comments about this article!

How To Construct a Portable Station - by Charles KC8VWM

With field day just around the corner, I thought it would be appropriate to create this easy and fun “how to” construction project article everyone can enjoy.

Criteria for the construction of this portable station involve a field portable rechargeable power system, a low cost, maximized performance, durable and lightweight, no tune, 40-6 meter multi band antenna system which could be thrown inside a backpack and deployed just about anywhere.

The rig we will be using for this radio adventure is an FT-817ND like this one:

0x01 graphic

Well ok, this doesn't exactly seem to look like an FT 817ND... What you are looking at here is an economical DVD player case which conveniently houses an FT 817ND, a rechargeable portable power source, user manuals, station log, pens, waterproof paper, portable light source, telescopic VHF antenna, power adapters, various antenna connectors with a shoulder carry strap. In short, you're looking at an instant portable QRP station in a bag.

0x01 graphic

The FT-817ND and portable SLA battery charger.

0x01 graphic

The FT-817ND operating position monitoring the 14.285 QRP calling frequency.

The amplified speakers fold out and a small battery compartment in the center houses a couple of AA batteries. These folding external speakers provide more clarity and increased loudness over the FT817ND's built in internal speaker.

0x01 graphic

The FT817ND rechargeable SLA battery pack, charging plug & wiring, log books and equipment user manuals etc. There are normally 2 -12vdc batteries in operation. However, unlike using a single battery setup, this particular setup is designed as such that if one battery should happen to fail, you can always revert to using the second battery. This battery arrangement can be charged using an AC adapter or a small portable 5 watt solar panel.

Alright, now let's move on to the homebrew 40 - 6m

no tune portable antenna system for this portable station.

0x01 graphic

KC8VWM's 40 - 6m no tune portable antenna system.

I wanted to maximize on actual performance and all band capabilities, and yet I did not wish to carry an antenna tuner around. I also wanted to build a durable antenna system using durable materials. To achieve this concept, I constructed this antenna using flex weave antenna wire. I chose this particular wire because it functions more like rope even though it appears to look like wire. I am using parachute cord for the antenna anchor sections. The inner camping laundry reels in the photo contain antenna wire while the outer reels house the parachute cord. The tent pegs are not the flimsy aluminum variety that bends over in the soil after 3 uses, but rather we will use the more durable 10” solid steel tent stakes. The feed line chosen is 25 feet of LMR 200®. This is a thin variety with an outside diameter of only 0.195”. It's similar to RG58 but it exhibits lower losses and improved specifications. (0.45 db loss x 25 ft @ 30 MHz.) The objective in choosing this particular feed line was in the fact it is very flexible and it reduces overall weight and bulk. Everything shown fits nicely inside a 15” nylon carry bag.

0x01 graphic

Dipole antenna feed point arrangement.

This is a typical hardware store schedule 40 - 2” PVC cap with stainless steel eye screws and S0-239 connector installed. This is very easy to construct by simply studying the construction in this photo. The top of this cap has a rope with a small loop on top with a knot inside the PVC cap installed. This is intended for both a portable telescopic pole or you may simply elevate the PVC cap and dipole for “tree branch” antenna operations.

20 foot aluminum telescopic extension pole and collapsible tripod system.

Open Position

Closed Position

The advantage of using a portable tripod system incorporated as part of this antenna configuration is somewhat obvious. However this particular arrangement was designed because it is very lightweight and maintains the idea that the collapsible tripod becomes part of the actual telescopic pole. This enhanced yet lightweight and effective antenna setup is particularly suitable for portable operations. It is also possible to simply secure the pole against an object without the need of using the built in tripod if desired.

Incidentally, the idea for this type of portable antenna tripod construction came directly from the product at this link:

Of course, it is required to exchange the 4' pole supplied with this product for a 20' one in the above product configuration. You may choose any aluminum telescopic painters pole you wish for this project however, it should be noted the antenna will also function well using only a tree branch as a main support. However, I felt there may be situations when I may not have trees available or I may not have enough feed line to always deploy such an antenna arrangement. I basically wanted to design this portable antenna project for a multitude of operating conditions and configurations.

The next few photographs show the antenna deployment arrangement and for the most part speak for themselves.

0x01 graphic

Note the flex weave antenna wire and how it's arranged on the eye screws to reduce wire stress.

0x01 graphic

0x01 graphic

CQ...CQ...CQ Field Day…

The antenna is setup for 20 meters in this photo. Now let's examine the “no tune” aspect of this portable antenna design.

0x01 graphic

This is the 20 meter paint mark on the antenna wire. Similarly, there are paint mark indicators for 6, 10, 12,17,15,20 and 30 meters. 40 meter operation simply requires you fully deploy all the wire from the antenna reel.

0x01 graphic

Once you have found the paint mark or band you desire to operate, you simply lock the wire around the tab as shown above. This photo also demonstrates the parachute cord attached which is fed to a second reel.

0x01 graphic

The second reel containing the parachute cord is located at ground level and attached to a 10” tent stake.

0x01 graphic

This details the deployed antenna to the feed point connection at the top of the telescopic pole. The antenna is currently setup for 20 meter operation.

0x01 graphic

Complete and fully deployed portable station arrangement includes folding lawn chair, FT 817ND, homebrew portable antenna arrangement and solar panel. Just add station operator.

0x01 graphic

Complete portable station broken down and ready for transport.

(Some equipment shown may be optional.)

I hope you have enjoyed this “how to” article and my hope is to inspire some QRP, field day or even some emcomm enthusiasts to consider constructing a similar portable station arrangement for their future portable communication needs.

As always suggestions, improvements, criticisms and comments are always most welcome.

My Best,

Charles - KC8VWM

Member Comments:
This article has expired. No more comments may be added.
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by M5GWH on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Looks a good tidy setup Charles - thank you!
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by G4AON on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Neat idea to use the washing line reels, I was so impressed I've just ordered a pair from an eBay trader to try them myself.

73 Dave
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K0BG on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Charles, when you reconstruct this set up, I have two suggestions.

First, screw the SO239 to the outside of the end cap. That way, the PL259 will be easier to screw on tight.

Two, buy an FT114-67 ferrite core, and wind a balun inside the cap. While you might not notice any changes, you won't have to worry about common mode currents or noise.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K4OB on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Very Cool !
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K0BG on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Yup! It's a wonder antenna. As in, wonder it works!

It has always intrigued me, that folks will buy all manner or antennas, without regard to any given attribute, or lack thereof. The end-fed dipole (?), and the Maxx-Comm both come to mind. As long as you can work DX, who cares about any other aspect?

It pays to remember; there really is one thing worse than being ignorant, and that is, not knowing you are!

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Good article, Charles. Those clothesline reels are FRAGILE (FRA-GEE-LAY). I quit using them as they would break easily, especially if dropped on a hard surface. Try refitting a chalk line reel.

Philip
KA4KOE
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Second thought....wind. Will a breeze knock it over? Might want to add a set of guys at 90 degrees to the wire.

Speaker stand tripods may also be worth a look. They are very similar.

Philip
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
The EFAB antenna looks like another one of those antennas with a swamping resistor inside the box. Open the box up and lets see whats inside.....my guess is its full of potting compound.

NOW, if there is an automatic antenna tuner in there with relays, caps, and inductors, it MAY be worth a look.

You probably should stay away from it. You're better off with a proper antenna any day than another gimmick.

Philip
KA4KOE

http://www.neidlinger.us/greenies.pdf
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
My version of the portable dipole. Fed with twin lead with a PL259 soldered on the end. Hooks up to my manpack. Its around 85 feet per leg, configured as an extended double zepp with gain. Twinlead is 450 ohm stuff from the Wireman.

http://tinyurl.com/meud65

Wire is WD-1T, extremely strong stuff.
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by N4NSS on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Good article... I need to write my antenna articles since I did this last year for my portable QRP.
I used 50 ft. per side on the same spools using 30 ft. of 300 ohm TV line, LDG 4:1 balun and 25 ft. coax to rig. Mine tunes 80-6 meters just fine.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
KA4KOE:

Second thought....wind. Will a breeze knock it over? Might want to add a set of guys at 90 degrees to the wire.

Philip

------------

Hi Philip.

It doesn't mention this in the article however, the collapsible tripod has holes in the feet. I use 3 - 10" tent pegs to hold it securely in the ground. I had this antenna setup up during 50 MPH winds and it experienced no problems at all.

However, if the telescopic pole you are choosing goes up to the 30' level and above, then I completely agree with your recommendation to install 90 degree guys (perhaps on separate reels using parachute cord) as a matter of safety. Another idea is to build a second antenna exactly like the first one and you could have the capability to switch antenna directions AND the second antenna would also serve to secure the pole in place against high winds.

However, I never experienced any problems with high winds and this antenna arrangement. The ground anchored tripod does a real good job of taking care of that.

Hmmm... come to think of it Philip, this outfit would be perfect to use with your green military radio equipment. :)

My Best.

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K4JSR on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Charles and Philip;

Why don't both of you come to beautiful Downtown
Statham, Ga. next week and work Field Day with us.
You will recieve a warm Barrow County welcome, get
fed on Saturday night, and I will go kidnap Rich,
K7SV, and introduce you to him. Such a deal!
I'll also introduce you to W1TF and all of you can
argue into the night as to whether QRP and/or Green
radios taste great or are less filling!

73, Cal K4JSR
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
First, screw the SO239 to the outside of the end cap. That way, the PL259 will be easier to screw on tight.

Two, buy an FT114-67 ferrite core, and wind a balun inside the cap. While you might not notice any changes, you won't have to worry about common mode currents or noise.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com

----------

Yup, your absolutely right about the "good engineering" aspects of installing the ferrite cores.
(Didn't have them on hand at the time...:)

The SO-239 connector was installed on the inside of the 2" cap because of the "curvature" on the outside of the PVC cap. The SO-239 I was using has an outer square plate with 4 holes to secure it to the PVC. It is for this reason it doesn't sit flush with the outer curved surface. I admit, it would have been better to have chosen an different style S0-239 without the outer square plate arrangement for this project. I just used parts I already had on hand from the parts toolbox. :)

My Best,

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K0BG on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Any antenna, other than a balanced one, requires some sort of ground plane. What shape or description doesn't matter, as long as the RF current which flows through the radiating element has some way of returning to the source. In the case of a vertical, that's its radial field, however it is constructed.

Antennas like the purported "end-fed dipole" (there really isn't such a thing) don't have a way for the RF to return to the source, so it flows back down the coax in the form of common mode currents. Basically the same things happens with J-poles, and OFC fed doublets. The amount of common mode current depends on a lot of factors, mostly related to how it is erected. It is this fact, that some folks think they work okay, and others have RFI problem. And too, the level of RF is related to how severe they are. At QRP levels, you can get by with just about anything (or over look it) depending on one's view of on-air performance. It's this latter debate (argument really), that's up in the air (pun intended!).

Comet's CHP-250 isn't any different. While it also uses a 6:1 transformer to feed its radiating element, it exhibits common mode currents as well. Here too, the installation does make a difference with respect to the level of common mode current. But the real issue with most of these wonder antennas, they're all about 20 to 50 dB down from a properly designed one. As a result, unless you have another antenna to compare it to, most folks don't realize (or care) about the level of efficiency. My earlier comment about using the number of DX stations worked, is seemingly all that matters.

If you're into this category of comparison, fine and dandy. I'm not!

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Charles and Philip;

Why don't both of you come to beautiful Downtown
Statham, Ga. next week and work Field Day with us.

-------

Hi Cal,

Thank you for your warm, sincere and most gracious invitation.

While we had a heck of a good time and fond memories of our previous visit with you and Philip in the past, I have to sadly decline this time around due to other pre arranged commitments.

Thank you.

Charles - KC8VWM
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by N4NSS on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I have a source for these laundry reels. They have a "K" like mount twist instead of being threaded.
I can get them for under $2.75 each.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by QRZDXR2 on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Charles

Well.. well... nice antenna design... except that its been done before... several times.

Even the military has one like it made by hygain back then and while they didn't use laundry reels.. they did use wire holders. Later even Collins came out with the old measuring tape reel antenna.

However, its a good stab at getting all the things in one bag. Just want to see you go from the car to the field in one trip with all this stuff.

However, when you get their what are you going to do sit on the grass with the bugs. (by the way nice looking lawn... glad to see you mowed it expecally for shooting this article.. grin... by the way also... does everyone in your neighborhood paint their house white?? geeze about the only color you have is green grass and white houses or structures..huh) LOL

However, I think I would make the changes that K0BG suggests due to his experteese and I concure with the balun idea also to improve the matching as well as the isolation of the coax to antenna.

However, after going throught your design several years ago.. I found a much easier way to get the antenna up... first build the tennis ball launcher... to get it up in the top of the trees... and if your hungry you also can pop a squirl out of the tree with it... once you have the fishing line up (you didn't consider using that for your tie offs (para cord wt. 1.8 lbs, rating 2,000 lbs fishing line wt 0.02 lbs, rating 250 lbs).. easy job to pull the antenna wire. Lay out two or three other lengths of wire on the ground... and attach it to the AH4 icom antenna tuner... and instant auto tune everything from DC to daylight antenna. Cheap, light and easy to transport too. I keep mine in two old sampson breif case's .. one for the radio and power.. the other for the AH4, antenna wire.. tennis ball shooter gizmo... spare balls.. etc. easy to tranport and gor-ella proof according to sampsons adds. light too.

However, that still leaves the .. where do you sit and operate factor. Grass is nice but cold and gets damp leaving all those nasty green stains. So what we do is take the 4x4 with the radio already mounted in the ting and about the only additional is to attach the antenna from the tree to the tip of the whip on the vehicle... the AH4 then will retune and works like gangbusters.

However, we used it that way now for several field days and always come in with nice scores around the US as well as over yonder... and when were done... can be back on the road in 5 in flat... jerk the wire down, tell the squirl off and throw it in the back.. and we're gone... easy simple and no work... and we got to sit in a nice leather comfiee seat while operating... and if it rains u only have to roll up the windows... sweet. Now one also needs susbstance. The cooler loaded with your favorite bevg, ice cold... A BBQ to cook the brocks and everything right at the back tailgate door... ahhh thats field day...

However, all this being said... ya done good on the lawn, painting the house WHITE..(no purple houses YET??) and your antenna... which, after everyone gets done here, will have it re-designed and won't look like the orginal... OH and don't even condsider getting your name associated with the commercial version. It has been proven that if you put it on the web.. and someone picks it up commercially, they won't even acknol you. Several of the others we know refuse to share with the web because of the theft of ideas without a mention of the person who made it first. (RE WA6CDE's 4BTV coax attachment plate, shown here on Eham, (still in the archives) yet a while later a manufacture came out sells it with no mention of CDE's idea.) His airstream antenna also was credited to someone else. Yet when he was down here years ago for the airstream rally, we went to see him and the antenna... to see if it would work on our airstream trailer... and it did. He gave the engineering drawings away freely to all. Several other hams at the airstream rally also took pictures of his design. Suddenly it shows up in QST as a how to article by someone else who also was in the airstream group. Go figure.

However, with all being said... ya done good and Thanks for shareing your ideas. It would be nice if instead of pictures only you had some drawings and specs if someone wanted to dup it.

Carry on... lets see some real time contact reports..life is too short for QRP.. grin.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by NO6L on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
>by N3JBH on June 20, 2009
>"...Aw i see the Maxx comm used resistors.. Well great news folks !!! now resistors and no potting gunk is used in these... toriods thermaleze wire , tefflon tubing , nylon and yes even some copper pipe. BUT not one single resistor to be found in it..."

So, tell me, how do you make a simple piece of wire sticking out the end of a coaxial cable work as an antenna without a counterpoise? You can still put all the mumbo-jumbo toroids, jigger pins, Teflon wire and capacitors in a box all you want and it still needs a counterpoise. In a nutshell, like K0BGW said, without one, all you're going to do is couple RF energy to the outside of the shield of the feed line, just like an EH or Isotron "antenna" does.

"Where's the counterpoise? The laws of physics says you need a counterpoise. I want my counterpoise."

NO6L
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
QRZDXR,

does everyone in your neighborhood paint their house white??

------

Lol - That sir is the neighbors 3 car garage and 2 story workshop -behind- his house. A link to Google earth is in my QRZ profile. :)

I live in the county on a few acres of land with lots and lots of green grass. ...Not really much fun to mow actually, but it's great place to play with antenna's!

Oh, I suppose I could have posted boring technical drawings of the antenna setup as you have proposed however, I wanted to capture the essence of a field day setup with all the pretty colors only photographs could possibly capture. :)

My Best,

73 de Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by NA0AA on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I like this design and keep hoping at some point to find some reels robust enough to do the job.

The tape-measure design is cool enough [and Nebraska Surplus has the original tapes available but no holders] but the way they are designed..heavy center section to be sure.

I've tried to locate cheap used fly-reels for the wire but I've yet to find a basket of them at a garage sale.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AD5VM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
K0BG said

It has always intrigued me, that folks will buy all manner or antennas, without regard to any given attribute, or lack thereof. The end-fed dipole (?), and the Maxx-Comm both come to mind. As long as you can work DX, who cares about any other aspect?
It pays to remember; there really is one thing worse than being ignorant, and that is, not knowing you are!"

By my quick count there are 1491 antennas reviewed on eham. Of all those antennas, one appears to stand out in terms of the number of reviews and average rating. The antenna has 266 reviews, average rating is a 5.0 out of 5...That antenna is an end fed dipole... A lot of ignorant people I guess.
The other item you mention, the Maxx-comm has 9 reviews and an overall rating of 2.8 out of 5.
That would be like saying there were a lot of worthless American cars in the seventies like the AMC Pacer and the Plymouth Cuda.
And I can think of a lot of things worse than being ignorant of a single aspect of a particular subject... Being dead, homeless or a know it all come to mind.
-AD5VM
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KB4QAA on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Nice package Charles, thanks for the article!
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K0BG on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Larry, you're correct. The problem is, a lot of those reviews refer to the number of DX contacts said antenna garnered. That in itself is not a measurement of any meaningful antenna attribute.

A lot of others refer to the antenna having a low SWR. Here too, that means little or nothing, and usually both.

As for the reviews? As long as you have a salt shaker, I guess they're okay.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
Portable Antennas/Gear/Etc.  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Sorry Cal.....

I'm itching to try out my AT1011 military vertical which was GIVEN to me, sans a couple of parts, a couple of days ago. This booger is a full 32' long, fiberglass, and sold by Shakespeare. Most of the parts fit in a camo canvas roll....

HOWEVER, I'm already promised to the CARS group here in Savannah.

Also, going to try out an AS2259 NVIS which in on indefinite loan to me as well.

A good recommended read is by our friend who visited your club, Cal....you know, the QRP techniques book sold by the ARRL....lots of good info.

Whatever you use portable, it should be that....portable. Simple.....

It is for fun or potential EMCOMM??

Define your purpose and design around that.

AND stay away from gimmick antennas, or gimmick dummy loads, whatever the case may be. The laws of physics don't change.

Philip
KA4KOE
 
RE: Portable Antennas/Gear/Etc.  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Author is Rich Arland for the QRP operating book.
 
RE: Portable Antennas/Gear/Etc.  
by KA4KOE on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Here's Shakespeare's version. Probably costs around 2 to 3K, if I were to guess.

http://www.shakespeare-military.com/mastshow.asp?product=4011
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by QRZDXR2 on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
charles...

man of man... you need a john deer or a big old craftsman rider to mow that lawn.

but, if you go to google maps and do a street view of your place it looks a lot different... almost like a war zone... must have been one of them little southern breezes. either that or they have the worng street.

what happened if you go to google maps and street view?

twisters?

Someone pointed out a YO YO antenna to me today... said it was better than a folded dipole and really looked like a fan dipole... he also claimed no tuner needed.. have you seen those.

I used a fan dipole some time back and what a hassel it was to get it tuned right... poooo... I like yours better

congrats on the white house neighbors grin...

73's

DXR2
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
but, if you go to google maps and do a street view of your place it looks a lot different... almost like a war zone...

-------


Lol yeah .. That photo was taken right after the infamous "ice storm" a couple of years ago. It was like a Tornado ripped through the neighborhood, Still have lots of firewood to this day...

Busted up my Yagi antenna's pretty good. I had to rebuild them. The OCF antenna actually survived even though it suspended a heavy tree limb. Amazing really it still works. We were without power for 28 days.

Well that's not exactly true, because I had the solar panels on the shack charging a bank of batteries connected to an 1500 watt inverter. I back fed the sub panel from the shack into the main panel in the house. We had emergency power up and running. Lights and TV anyways. Couldn't operate the furnace or heavy appliances but we were a lot better off than most people around here at the time.

There you go making me go off topic again... :)

My Best,

Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Someone pointed out a YO YO antenna to me today... said it was better than a folded dipole and really looked like a fan dipole... he also claimed no tuner needed.. have you seen those.

-----

Well the only thing about Bill's antenna design is in the fact that it functions like a fan dipole.

In terms of "efficiency" I don't see how spreading RF energy to several wires so you can operate on any band as particularly "efficient."

While this may provide multi band capability I don't feel there's a free lunch either in the process.

Now don't get me wrong, Bill makes some great antenna's, It just that in general, I feel that a single wire antenna, configured into a multi band setup array will do a much better job of radiating RF energy than a full time multi array of wires configured to simultaneously operate across a wide spectrum of frequencies in comparison. I would think that focusing your RF energy into a single wire antenna would be a better arrangement because it doesn't "waste" RF energy.

My Best, (I guess I need to put the flameproof suit on) Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Someone pointed out a YO YO antenna to me today... said it was better than a folded dipole and really looked like a fan dipole... he also claimed no tuner needed.. have you seen those.

-----

Well the only thing about Bill's antenna design is in the fact that it functions like a fan dipole.

In terms of "efficiency" I don't see how spreading RF energy to several wires so you can operate on any band as particularly "efficient."

While this may provide multi band capability I don't feel there's a free lunch either in the process.

Now don't get me wrong, Bill makes some great antenna's, It just that in general, I feel that a single wire antenna, configured into a multi band setup array will do a much better job of radiating RF energy than a full time multi array of wires configured to simultaneously operate across a wide spectrum of frequencies in comparison. I would think that focusing your RF energy into a single wire antenna would be a better arrangement because it doesn't "waste" RF energy.

My Best, (I guess I need to put the flameproof suit on) Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 20, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Today's poll:

Is a single wire multiband antenna better than using a multi element wire, multiband antenna in terms of overall antenna efficiency.

73
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AD5VM on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I vote single wire.
160 meter horizontal loop, balanced feedline, fully balanced antenna tuner (Palstar BT-1500A)

If you've got the real estate, this is the mother of the all-band antennas. Mine's only about 25' off the ground. As long as there's not a thunderstorm in the area, my noise floor on all bands is almost always S-Zero. 1:1 SWR on all bands. Virtually zero feedline loss and I've looked at the tuner with the cover off with a FLIR camera, during a QSO while running 800 watts, no loss there. Do a QST search on balanced antenna tuners and feedline.
Coax is easier, not better. If your feedline is part of the antenna, you can Tune the entire circuit to resonance, not just "fool" your tranceiver into thinking it's a resonant load as is the case with a typical antenna tuner / coax / doublet situation.

BTW: I have no RF in the shack, balanced feedline only radiates if you do something to un-balance it.
MFJ makes a dual needle current meter so you can see if your balanced line is out of balance and you can fix the problem.

Disclamer: I'm not an RF engineer so I'm probably wrong about everything I've said. Please ignore this post.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W6EM on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
"However, I think I would make the changes that K0BG suggests due to his experteese and I concure with the balun idea also to improve the matching as well as the isolation of the coax to antenna."

Here's one more. If you look in the plumbing department at Home Depot or Lowe's, you'll find what are called "test caps." If you buy a short run of 3 inch PVC and a few drain caps, you can make several enclosures for balun toroids and even have room to mount an eye hook at 90 degrees to the ones used for each antenna leg. When finished, just glue the test plugs into the ends of the pipe section.

The other plus, besides being waterproof, is that you can use a knife to cut open the test plugs later, if you need to get inside, since they're made of much thinner material.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K0BG on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
The only thing I'd add to Lee's idea (I use it myself), is to leave a small weep hole in the bottom surface.

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K0BG on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
One thing I forgot, Charles. When you mount an SO239 on the outside of the cap, orientate the flange so the holes at perpendicular to the curvature. Although this leaves you just two mounting holes, it is nonetheless, strong enough.

The end cap I use is a 3 inch one, and it's been up for nearly 3 years and hadn't cause any problems. By the way, a 3 inch cap is large enough to hole an FT240-67 core and windings with room to spare (QRO use).

Alan, KØBG
www.k0bg.com
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AB7E on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
W6EM: "Here's one more. If you look in the plumbing department at Home Depot or Lowe's, you'll find what are called "test caps." If you buy a short run of 3 inch PVC and a few drain caps, you can make several enclosures for balun toroids and even have room to mount an eye hook at 90 degrees to the ones used for each antenna leg. When finished, just glue the test plugs into the ends of the pipe section."

Those test caps will very rapidly become brittle in the sun ... it just eats them alive. I used them to keep critters out of exposed ABS tubes while I was building this house and they don't last long at all. They might hold up better if painted, but they make a bad permanent solution.

Dave AB7E
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by N0YXB on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Cool article. I'm surprised it created such a flurry of responses from the troll without spellchecker or the self-appointed antenna expert.
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W6EM on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
AB7E:"Those test caps will very rapidly become brittle in the sun ... it just eats them alive. I used them to keep critters out of exposed ABS tubes while I was building this house and they don't last long at all. They might hold up better if painted, but they make a bad permanent solution."

Dave, I should have added to paint the whole enchilada with a thick layer of good outdoor latex paint. Preferably black or tree bark brown, like I did.

Actually, PVC itself, especially the white stuff, is lousy in the sunshine. It quickly turns orange and gets brittle since the UV tends to break it down. Unless its loaded with lots of carbon black, like the overhead wire coverings are.

Flat latex is cheap, thick, and won't hurt the plastic after its sealed up.

As to drilling holes for the SO-239, the end caps and the pipe wall itself are thick enough that you can use a file to flatten the wall outside surface and even slightly imbed the SO-239 flange before you drill the mounting holes. Makes for a slicker (and easier to seal) penetration. Besides, there shouldn't be any tension on the connector from weight of the coax. coax should be slung via 'chute cord to the eye hook to relieve the strain on the connector if more than just a few feet. I use the three of four mount technique. Three screws, lock washers and nuts. The fourth hole is a feed through for the AWG 14 wire that is soldered to the SO-239 flange and plugged with glue.

I use these for all of my permanent, balun connected dipoles and quarter wave stubs via tee connectors. Hung in the trees with 'chute cord via an ezhang knock off.... All a shady operation in the summer. Temporarily permanent until the next major storm :-)

Lee
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K1CJS on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Charles--

A nice idea and project. From the looks and description of it, I'd say you've got a winner--even if it has been done before.

As usual, however, the usual posters have crawled out of the woodwork. One thing I've learned about projects I come up with is this--don't post them on e-ham. From the lack of moderation to the individuals that have to pick apart every idea under a technical or engineering microscope, it just isn't worth the aggrevation.

73, Chris, K1CJS
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks Chris. :)
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by QRZDXR2 on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Charles...
I agree a single wire is not only better but cheaper too.. however, most are not used on a single band so the antenna matching comes into play...


SUGGESTIONS:

As to PVC items. I use two (and a short piece of pipe sealing the insides cap-to-cap) gray electrical stuff as it seems to be more resistant to the effects of UV. These end caps are more square than the white water PVC ones also.

Coax Antenna connector... I don't use at the center antenna wire coax fitting at the junction. instead we use a electrical sealed strain relif..(DIY store bought), one of the plastic rubber bushing compression kind, around the coax and have a lead length long enough (set calibrated distance) so as not to have a connector at both ends. (loss reduction) Seems to be a better way to work the balun/antenna center connection while keeping moisture out and retaining/holding the coax. (open wire/vs/coax loss is not considered here due to mobility issues)

ISSUES:
But, how long will the white ones last... prob longer than the antenna will be up. So it might be a mute point as most wire antennas come down yearly and yours is a field (temp) one I think also.

By the way... while you used flexweave wire for the antenna...(and you can get it coated) little more expensive, I perfer to use good old No. 12 stranded/ coated white electrical wire... (disappears in the sky) seems to last about the same as flexweave.. ya a little stiffer but then again common to all the home DIY places. (cheap)

(I think the next debate would be if the plastic coating helps or hinders the radiation, as we know it keeps the corrosion down on the wire which does hinder it.)

NOIDS/TROLL:
N0YXB wrote on June 21, 2009
Cool article. I'm surprised it created such a flurry of responses from the troll without spellchecker or the self-appointed antenna expert.

Talk about a TROLL... (sic) YXB your contrubiting what to the conversation? Hate and discontent for the mini U ? If we ignore you will you go away YXB.. thanks

Geeezzz... well back to the article.

EDUCATIONAL:
nice educational thread. The newbies really can learn something about making their own fun antennas on this one.

GRADITUDITY:
Thanks again Charles...ya done good. Oh and I vote for the single wire antenna too... although I treat mine like a zep, end fed, only because its up in the tree and no center needed. (ya I guess I am lazy that way... and you use what ever works best while keeping peace with the neighbors eyesight. (grin)

DXR2

NOTES:
Wow what a storm. Shows how some hams are ready for anyting. Right now you can get lots of of the older ONAN gens from motorhomes being scrap'd for under 400 bux off craigs list. I got a Onan 6.5 kw 1800 rpm w/remote start unit that is a '89 for 300 (400 hrs on it) and it runs on propane...nat gas or reg gas. sweet. Made a little trailer for it so we can tow it behind the car if we want to use it on field day or where ever it may be needed if not for the house. (make sure you also have a utility disconect on the house (law) Pretty quiet inside the box.

...ya pay to water the lawn to make it green and grow... then curse it for growing... because you have to go out 'n pay someone to mow it down... something illogical about doing that.. makes for job security. too bad it takes a adult to run a lawn mower today.. (get a horse?, then you have a nother haz waist (EPA permit needed) problem to dispose of. (smile). Another one of life's little "gotch ya" (smile) -)
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by WA8MEA on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
I like this design and keep hoping at some point to find some reels robust enough to do the job.
------------------------------------------------------
I use what I sell and I have one Yo-Yo-Vee that has been up for over 5 years. I had a single reel connected to my bedroom shortwave for over seven years.

I have a 60 meter Yo-Yo-Vee that had a branch fell on top of the wire during a snowstorm this past winter. Guess what snapped? The bungee cord holding up that end of the antenna! The reel went sailing onto the driveway, unharmed.

The reels have survived 100 degree days in the summer and -20 degree days in the winter and an occasional drop on the sidewalk.

Now I did have one customer who accidentally DROVE over a reel. I don't think they'll survive that punishment though. ;-)

73, Bill
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W6EM on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
"(I think the next debate would be if the plastic coating helps or hinders the radiation, as we know it keeps the corrosion down on the wire which does hinder it.)"

OK. How about "it weights the wire down and results in unnecessary tension to hold it up."

Why not go over to the local motor shop and buy some 12AWG soft drawn solid copper with a good enamel insulation and do it right? You can use it to wind baluns with, too. And, while you're there, buy a roll of Scotch 27, or better, 69, high temperature insulating glass tape from them to wrap balun cores with.

K0BG 'rolls his own' baluns. A lot of us do. I even did a small QRP balun for my son's 817 and another for my 703+.

You guys without calls because you don't want to bother have a screw loose somewhere. Why would any sane person bother posting here about something 'on the air' related without a call sign? (Hint: only if a CBer or GMRSer)
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K1WCC on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Hey, C'mon, guys, this is a great effort and should work if Charles can bust the pileups with his 817ND.

What's important about the neighborhood is..it seems to be antenna friendly! White, blue, pink, who cares what the color of the houses are, as long as no one complains about the wires!

Good luck, Charles-look for me, as K1RK, 2A EMA!

Henry K1WCC
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by WA8MEA on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Why not go over to the local motor shop and buy some 12AWG soft drawn solid copper with a good enamel insulation and do it right?
-------------------------------------------------
(Uh-oh! Here comes the next free-for-all sub-topic!)

I HATE SOLID!

Cuz it can get awfully KINKY....

And once you get a kinky kink in solid, you now have the weakest link due to kink.

Nice 12 gauge contractors grade....insulated stranded from Lowe's. You just can't go wrong. One will always have to deal with kinky. However, the stranded kinky isn't as kinky as a solid kinky is kinky.

73, Bill
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AB9LZ on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
To be specific, that article should have been labeled "how to construct a SSB NVIS QRP station that should be good for working all of the other FD sites within a tri state area", it's portable to about a 200 yards from your car at best, a pileup buster it's not.

73 m/4
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W7ETA on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
FB article OM!

Great easy to read and follow prose with appropriate photos.

PLUS, it looks like a well thought out and superbly executed setup for its intended purpose.

6 thumbs up--2 each from me, myself and I.

vy 73 OM
Bob
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by WA8MEA on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
To be specific, that article should have been labeled "how to construct a SSB NVIS QRP station that should be good for working all of the other FD sites within a tri state area", it's portable to about a 200 yards from your car at best, a pileup buster it's not.
*****************************************************
Cheap shot.

I watched a fella at a hamfest today using a 100 watt portable along with his "Friendly Stick" to "launch his signal". He kept calling CQ over and over again...without a single response.

I bet Charle's antenna (and similar) make more contacts using QRP rigs than the hamfest fella with his "Friendly Stick" and 100 watt xcvr. That's because Charles has a full size portable antenna....not some "slicked up" mobile whip(s)....

Bill
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AB9LZ on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
It's not a cheap shot... there are hundreds of folks out there that have taken QRP portable to a high art (google bumblebee for several examples). My mother-in-law travels lighter than this setup.

For the amount of crap he has, you *could* haul a hundred watts out to a picnic table.

73 m/4
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KC8VWM on June 21, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
QRZDXR,

I got a Onan 6.5 kw 1800 rpm w/remote start unit that is a '89 for 300 (400 hrs on it) and it runs on propane...nat gas or reg gas. sweet.

>>> Yup, have one in the motor home. They work great as long as the gas stations are open.. Ours were closed during the ice storm. Something about no power to operate the gas pumps or the credit card machines to process transactions or some silly excuses like that. :) Since the generator also runs on propane, I though no problem.. It would be easier to use that instead. It seems some places were selling propane bottles by "reservation." Most people needed propane bottles for "heating" So when I tried to buy a bottle of propane for my generator, all the bottles inside the cage had labels with someones name on them. Which reminds me, I need to buy more gas so I can cut the lawn yet again... Who invented the idea of grass - and why exactly?

WA8MEA,

The reels have survived 100 degree days in the summer and -20 degree days in the winter and an occasional drop on the sidewalk.

>>>> It was around 100 degrees here in Oklahoma on the day you see in the photo's. In fact, I once saw a T-shirt that read, "If you don't like the heat, stay out of Oklahoma." :)

Most of the time the two threaded halves of the reels simply just separate and come apart when dropped. I just screw both sides back together and forget about it. I did actually break one once. Guess that what happens when the whole thing comes crashing down from 35 feet above to the pavement below. Guess, my support line came untied and let go when I was securing the end supports just a little too tight and when I didn't have the center support fully secured yet.

Only one reel actually broke. The rest of them survived just fine. It only broke the tab off the end of the reel.. and not the reel itself. Cost me a whole $2.00 or something like that to replace.

WA8MEA,

I bet Charle's antenna (and similar) make more contacts using QRP rigs than the hamfest fella with his "Friendly Stick" and 100 watt xcvr. That's because Charles has a full size portable antenna.

>>> Exactly Bill... K0BG once said all 100 watt mobile stations are operating QRP. Makes sense if you think about it. I guess that makes my 5 watt rig connected to this full sized antenna a "super station" by comparison... :-)

K1WCC

This is a great effort and should work if Charles can bust the pileups with his 817ND.

AB9LZ

It's portable to about a 200 yards from your car at best, a pileup buster it's not.

>>> Well not sure about the FT 817 being a pile up "buster" per se, but I DO have a few favorite QRP contacts in the log when using this particular antenna setup:

10/26 PJ2T Curacao, Netherland Antilles
10/26 XE1CWJ Mexico
10/26 RW1ZA Russia
01/19 YV5MSG Caracas,Venezuela

I am hoping to add K1RK, 2A EMA to the log soon... :)

W7ETA,

6 thumbs up--2 each from me, myself and I.

>>> Gee you sure seem to have a lot of thumbs over there. Bet you have no problem operating a lot of DX using split. :) Thanks for the prose!

W6EM

And, while you're there, buy a roll of Scotch 27, or better, 69, high temperature insulating glass tape from them to wrap balun cores with.

>>> That's a great tip.. Thanks.

73 de Charles - KC8VWM
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W7ETA on June 22, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Working thru a pile-up is tough goin Charles.

I get frustrated when I can't find where the DX is listening; I wind up wanting to plop down in the middle of the pile and start xmitting.

Me wants to start in the middle of the pile and start and start working down to find where the DX is listening.

Myself wants to hit the middle of the pile and start goin up.

Working split pile-ups with the committee arguing is difficult.

Must be a bit like posting an article on eHam?!

73
Bob
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by WA8MEA on June 22, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Most of the time the two threaded halves of the reels simply just separate and come apart when dropped. I just screw both sides back together and forget about it.
******************************************************
If by threaded you mean the "twist a couple of revolutions until tight" types of reels, those disappeared off the market two years ago.

There are two brands left that are "twist and semi-lock". Those are MUCH sturdier than the late, great Wal-Mart brand.

Which reminds me....I need new pictures! A few of my older antennae on my website have the old Wal-Mart reels. Everything I sell now use Coglin(sp?) or Coleman.

73, Bill - WA8MEA
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AB7E on June 22, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
If sturdy reels are an issue, why not use regular chalk line reels? They're cheap ($7 to $10 each), readily available, have locking handles, and take a ton of abuse.

Dave AB7E
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KF4OZJ on June 22, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Nice set-up, some great ideas here for anyone new or old to Field Day....73's
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W6EM on June 23, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
WA8MEA:"I HATE SOLID!

Cuz it can get awfully KINKY...."

Really? Only if you don't take the time to uncoil it.


"And once you get a kinky kink in solid, you now have the weakest link due to kink."

Don't be so sure. Work hardening isn't just a phrase. Soft drawn metals, when bent and straightened, are harder, not softer. If, though, you over do it and cause the grains to fracture, you've got a break.


"Nice 12 gauge contractors grade....insulated stranded from Lowe's. You just can't go wrong. One will always have to deal with kinky. However, the stranded kinky isn't as kinky as a solid kinky is kinky."

OK. No such thing as "contractor's grade." Contractor's price, yes, if you want to buy a 500 foot roll.

As to being nit picky, if you really want to do it "right," then your wire should be AWG 12 or 14 Copperweld, which is copper coated steel. REALLY stiff solid stuff. As I recall, the National Electric Code has something to say about antenna wires. Here it is: Table 810.16A Size of Receiving Station Outdoor Antenna Conductors.

1. Aluminum alloy or copper (hard drawn). For 35 to 150 foot spans, AWG 14. Over 150 feet, AWG 12.
2. Copper clad steel... 35 to 150 feet, AWG 17. Over 150 feet, AWG 14.

Last time I checked, building wire is soft drawn copper. Not to be confused with hard drawn. Hard drawn is VERY stiff stuff.

Lee
W6EM/4
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K5EST on June 23, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Nice presentation, Charles, even with the
know-it-all's moaning and groaning, you
produced a useful article and thread
which may encourage others to go portable.

If you have a chance to include both
horizontal and vertical antennas in your
pack, its sometimes worth the effort by
being able to switch between the two. A
homebrew PAC-12 or similar is very handy.

73....Walter - K5EST
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KA4KOE on June 24, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Again, nice presentation from me too Charles. We all have our own idea of what 'portable' and practical translates to. However, the basic physics will never change.....that translates to getting as much physical wire in the air as you can, and having a GOOD counterpoise if you are using a vertical or end fed antenna, IF you intend to have a fighting chance of being heard during poor solar minimum conditions combined with low power levels.

My PRC1099 is ready. Hopefully, the spare parts for the Shakespeare AT-1011 military 32' foot vertical will be here in time for Field Day. I just love trying things out for the first time like that....guarantees failures, missing parts, pulling out hairs, loads o' good ole' radio fun!!!

Let's be safe this weekend guys and gals! Watch out for power lines and take shelter if you hear thunder.

Philip Neidlinger, PE
KA4KOE
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by QRZDXR2 on June 25, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
As to being nit picky, if you really want to do it "right," then your wire should be AWG 12 or 14 Copperweld, which is copper coated steel. REALLY stiff solid stuff. As I recall, the National Electric Code has something to say about antenna wires. Here it is: Table 810.16A Size of Receiving Station Outdoor Antenna Conductors.

1. Aluminum alloy or copper (hard drawn). For 35 to 150 foot spans, AWG 14. Over 150 feet, AWG 12.
2. Copper clad steel... 35 to 150 feet, AWG 17. Over 150 feet, AWG 14.

Last time I checked, building wire is soft drawn copper. Not to be confused with hard drawn. Hard drawn is VERY stiff stuff.

Lee
W6EM/4

Well let me tell you about copperweld... and how after a while its impeadance starts going up once the copper starts to corrode. Eventually you only have a steel wire antenna. Not that good.

Cost? we won't even go their in compairing it to good old Lows No. 12 stranded/coated wire.

Heck if your worried about weight... use larger cord line. It ain't that much different though as solid wire is more dense than stranded.. and the plastic coating can't be that much more in weight.

Best be knowing that most RF is on the surface of the conductor ONLY.... not in it... so which has more surface.. multi stran or solid.. I rest in the chair.

grin...

I perfer the cheap multi stran low's No. 12 copper electrical wire in white, green, blue or black so it blends in....
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W4HV on June 25, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
It is a nice little station that works for exactly what one would want! Quick to deploy. easy to move and lots of fun..Good job!!
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by W6EM on June 25, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Cloaked Commenter: "Well let me tell you about copperweld... and how after a while its impeadance starts going up once the copper starts to corrode. Eventually you only have a steel wire antenna. Not that good."

You obviously don't know your metals. Their electronegativity, that is. Copper is most negative/noble. All the rest are more positive/anodic, and become oxides quickly.

Ever hear of an "insulating union?" You know, the plastic insulating gasket to separate copper water pipes from galvanized iron going into and out of water heaters. The reason: to avoid having the iron pipe quickly corrode away as a sacrificial anode to the copper.

Ground rods. Why not just drive in a steel or iron rod? Rust isn't conductive. And, if there's any copper close around, it will disintegrate that much faster.

Now, if you knick through the copper surface of copperweld, then you set up a corosion cell that operates whenever it gets wet. Ultimately coroding away not the copper, but the steel underneath. So, you have to be careful with the stuff.

......
"Best be knowing that most RF is on the surface of the conductor ONLY.... not in it... so which has more surface.. multi stran or solid.. I rest in the chair."

Oh, I suppose stranded has a tad more surface area, but not a big deal more. The reason copperweld is just as effective as solid at RF frequencies is just that: the skin effect.

Now, here's one for your rocking chair. At just over 100F, PVC starts releasing anhydrous hydrogen chloride. If it can find any moisture around, it quickly turns any copper in the vicinity to "green goo." Now, lets assume your THW/THHN/THWN PVC insulated stranded wire gets hot while hung out between supports. The gas gets exuded into the interstices of the strands. And, thanks to a little left over moisture from rain that found its way into the strands........

Is your pipe full yet? Light up and take a big draw.
 
How to Construct a Portable Station  
by KB1IAI on July 3, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
popcorn is done and
the captain & diet coke
are ice cold.
carry on fellas
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by AE5JU on July 4, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Sunlight... brittle pvc... corrosion...

I think you guys are forgetting that this is not a permanent setup. It is a portable antenna for occasional use.

While the chalk line reels are stronger, they are also much heavier.

I agree that the 817 is not a blowtorch, but is not meant to be. It is what it is.

I think the OP accomplished his goal.

Paul
AE5JU
 
RE: How to Construct a Portable Station  
by K9EZ on July 11, 2009 Mail this to a friend!
Great article! Presents some good ideas for my portable station. Thank you for taking the time to write it up.

Amazing how some of the people here act like little children. Seriously folks... grow up.
 
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