eHam.net - Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) Community

Call Search
     

New to Ham Radio?
My Profile

Community
Articles
Forums
News
Reviews
Friends Remembered
Strays
Survey Question

Operating
Contesting
DX Cluster Spots
Propagation

Resources
Calendar
Classifieds
Ham Exams
Ham Links
List Archives
News Articles
Product Reviews
QSL Managers

Site Info
eHam Help (FAQ)
Support the site
The eHam Team
Advertising Info
Vision Statement
About eHam.net



[Articles Home]  [Add Article]  

Amateur Radio Participation is Key to University Solar Eclipse Experiment:

from The ARRL Letter on August 3, 2017
Add a comment about this article!

Amateur Radio Participation is Key to University Solar Eclipse Experiment:

Virginia Tech https://vt.edu/ electrical engineering professor Greg Earle, W4GDE, is heading up a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded solar eclipse experiment dubbed CEDAR -- Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions. The experiment proposes to study the effects on the ionosphere of the August 21 total eclipse of the Sun, using a combination of GPS receivers, the university's SuperDARN http://vt.superdarn.org/ (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) radar system, HF Amateur Radio, and plasma modeling. Several graduate students and researchers, as well as the Virginia Tech Amateur Radio Association (K4KDJ) and the Amateur Radio community at large have been recruited to help.

"We want to understand how the ionosphere is affected by blockage of sunlight over a relatively short interval (~2 hours), understand how man-made systems are affected by the changes in the ionosphere, and use the data to improve our numerical models," Earle told ARRL, noting that the "plan has morphed a bit" since the initial proposal of more than a year ago, although "the idea is still the same."

Virginia Tech students Magdalina Moses, KM4EGE, and Xiaoyu "Harry" Han, KM4ICI, along with Virginia Tech electrical engineering professor Bob McGwier, N4HY, are among those pitching in.

Earle and his team are will use the data they collect to characterize ionospheric plasma density variations caused by the eclipse, measure HF scintillation -- rapid fluctuation of signal phase and/or amplitude -- during the eclipse, study the motions of plasma irregularities produced in both the E and F layers, and use numerical models to test cause-and-effect scenarios to compare with empirical data.

"The proposed study will utilize diagnostic capabilities that have never before been used to study a mid-latitude eclipse," the CEDAR abstract explains. "Through this work we will answer several fundamental questions that remain unresolved, despite previous eclipse studies, and we will engage a huge cohort of non-scientists in gathering data that will constrain our models and enrich our understanding of ionospheric behavior."

That "huge cohort" includes participants in the Solar Eclipse QSO Party (SEQP http://www.arrl.org/files/file/QST/This%20Month%20in%20QST/August2017/Silver.pdf), sponsored by ARRL and HamSCI http://www.hamsci.org/. "During this event, radio operators will actively communicate throughout the eclipse interval over paths that transect the eclipsed region of the ionosphere," the CEDAR proposal outlines. "These data will include information on the signal strength and maximum usable frequency in various HF bands, which are directly related to the density and altitude of the ionosphere." The experiment will also draw on data generated by WSPR Net http://wsprnet.org/ and the Reverse Beacon Network (RBN http://www.reversebeacon.net/). Read more http://www.arrl.org/news/amateur-radio-participation-is-key-to-university-solar-eclipse-experiment.

Source:

The ARRL Letter

There are no comments on this article: Post One

Email Subscription
My Subscriptions
Subscriptions Help

Other News Articles
Ham Radio Coming to PCHS:
Ham Radio Operators Assist With Puerto Rico Recovery:
Amateur Radio Service Helps Fight Hunger:
Ham Radio Operators Vital if Disaster Strikes:
Ballots Counted in 2017 Director, Vice Director Elections: