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Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:

Tom Wright (NN2X) on August 16, 2019
View comments about this article!

Hi fellow Ham operators,

My son, who is Adam Wright, (call sign KI5FJE), had recently passed is Tech license.

Adam had Zero interest in Ham radio, I asked him to consider this like a college exam. (He will be going full time next year). Adam told me he would do it for me and pass the exam. I felt after he passed he would embrace...

Before I carry on...

One point about the Tech license, you cannot memorize the 450 questions pool...You really have to understand the material. You might pick up some of the questions this way, but you will not pass, you need to understand and comprehend the material (At least most of it).

Adam did this for Dad, and he passed after studying for 2.5 weeks. And I can assure you if the code was required, (5 WPM) he would had passed that as well... (Only for his Dad.)

However, the point is no matter the qualifications to become a Ham, if you have the DNA, the passion, you will obtain the license and further enjoy and embrace.

If don't have the DNA to become a Ham operator, you may pass the exam, (for various reasons), but never use it.

I am sure everyone of the Hams that are reading this, recalls the desire to speak round the world with a piece of wire. However, not all of us has the same thrills!

So, in summary, no matter the qualifications that is required to become a Ham, there will always be a certain percentage of the population that will become a Ham operators, regardless of the challenges to pass the exam. If the standards keep dropping, this will not change the outcome, you may have more Ham operators licensed, but the same percentage of population of the world will be ACTIVE Hams operators.

At this present moment, my son (Adam) has no interest in Ham radio, but is licensed. However, one point that piqued his interest, his first QSO was with 2E0RUX Anne-Marie for UK...That was fun for him! But that was about it (Through Yacht Network / This is for young Ham operators).

Additionally, I am working with NASA, folks, and they have the inside track to talk with folks at the ISS. We will see.

C U all the bands...

NN2X (And maybe KI5FJE!)

Tom, 73

Member Comments:
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Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K8QV on August 16, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I had a Spanish teacher in the Ninth Grade who set up a station at school and let us talk to people in other countries. He offered to give classes in his language lab so we could get the Novice license if we wanted to. Some of us wanted to. He told us we would learn about the FCC rules and a bit about propagation and electronics. "And oh, by the way, you'll need to learn Morse code." Unlike today, we just said, "okay, if that's what it takes that's what we'll do." Nobody earned the license and then didn't use it.
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K8ZT on August 16, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Youth in Amateur Radio Resources

* The Kids Radio Zone- www.ztlearn.com/radio-kids
* Teacher Radio Zone- www.ztlearn.com/radio-teachers
* Ham Radio Youth Resources Handout- tiny.cc/hry
* Tri-fold STEM brochure “Ham Radio- The Original Maker Movement”- tiny.cc/hr-makers
* Scouting & Amateur Radio- tiny.cc/ar-scout
* Ham Radio Quick Start Guide- tiny.cc/new-ham
* K8ZT Amateur Radio Resources- www.k8zt.com
* K8ZT Amateur Radio Education Outreach Column Collection - tiny.cc/ar-ed-out
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by AA4MB on August 16, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Bravo to Adam for acknowledging that him getting his license meant a lot to his dad - so he just did it! Give it time - and maybe a few joint QSOs - and see if he develops an interest in operating. As for me, I picked up more knowledge and general life skills as a result of being in the hobby than I likely would have otherwise. However, if I had just been licensed and not done anything with it, it would have been another story entirely. 'Radio clubs' are becoming populated by an increasing number of license holders vs operators nowadays. I hope that each of them develop an interest in operating someday.

- Matt, AA4MB
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KB6QXM on August 17, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats to your son for passing your technician class license.

Present day technician class license requirement are not much more than putting your name and date on an application.

I wonder how many young hams would pass the old Novice class license with 5 WPM at the FCC field office.

Different times, different requirements. No more 1-year non-renewable license. 75-watt input. CW crystal controlled. A very disciplined state of mind back then.

Either you upgraded or you found another hobby. That is all gone.

73
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KC7MF on August 17, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
"Present day technician class license requirement are not much more than putting your name and date on an application.

I wonder how many young hams would pass the old Novice class license with 5 WPM at the FCC field office.

Different times, different requirements. No more 1-year non-renewable license. 75-watt input. CW crystal controlled. A very disciplined state of mind back then.

Either you upgraded or you found another hobby. That is all gone."

You just could not let the young man have his accomplishment, could you. I swear, as a bona fide geezer myself, that old poops are going to be the end of this hobby.

For your information sport, the test is the law. It took study for him to do it and it is a great first step. It is also a great compliment to his father.

Oh you are sooooo proud of your code and beginning electronics test. Try this sport. Try to learn the computer coding that young people in great numbers are learning today. It makes Mr. Morse' code look like child's play. Basic electronics? You learn to build the computer you are typing your arrogant insults on.

Ham radio will, no doubt, end someday. It will end all the sooner if we experienced hams do not get down from our arrogant thrones, welcome and mentor new people and foster interest in the hobby. But no. We have to endlessly natter on about Morse Code and how hard it used to be. Well guess what fellow geezers. These young people today are kind to give us the time of day. We did not earn that from them. They will define the future of the world and, of course, this hobby. It is time we either get with the program or sell our stuff and take up bridge.

I do a net a few times a week. I have NEVER had a young ham be anything but polite and respectful to me. Would it be too hard for you to be polite and respectful to them? Or are you just too bitter? And, oh by the way, their technique if very frequently much better than that of people who have been hams for 50 years.

To the young ham who just passed his tech license...Welcome to the hobby. I look forward to talking with you on the air one day. Ignore the few rude people you meet. They do not represent the majority of hams. If you decide to get your general and have interest in being a net controller I will happily teach you how to do it and get you started.

Now everyone else. How about welcoming him to the hobby and congratulating him for studying and passing his test.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KA7EKW on August 17, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
"Different times, different requirements."

There are reasons for that, Bob. Likewise, you don't have to prove your ability to start an engine using a crank when you get a driver's license.

As far as "A very disciplined state of mind back then," you obviously weren't there.

The next time you want to disrespect the achievements of other hams, post your own history first, so that those of us who have been around a while can give it a similar treatment.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by AA4MB on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
"I wonder how many young hams would pass the old Novice class license with 5 WPM at the FCC field office."

Well, putting it in its proper perspective, let's agree that this was the ONLY way to be licensed in the past. I was licensed in 1974. We didn't have to go to a FCC office, but I took quite a few classes from the local radio club and then, they gave the Novice test. We did NOT go to a local FCC office. As to how many would pass it if we could get in a time machine … who knows? One thing I do recall - I don't remember anyone in my era NOT passing it. The respondent who drew reference to hand cranking a car was on the right track. Times have changed and these are the requirement for the license now. Period.

Let's all do what we can to encourage prospective licensees and new licensees to pick up a microphone, connect to digital, etc. It's way more productive than talking about what was vs. what is, anyway.

- Matt, AA4MB
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I am the original author for this article

Thank you all for giving congrats to my son (Adam, KI5FJE) on passing the Tech license.

Here is what I learned. If you have the desire to speak around the world with a piece of wire strung up in your backyard, you will pass the exam, regardless of the requirements.

My son (Adam) would had passed if the code was required. As I asked him to pass it..

However, the thought that more people would be Hams because of changing the requirements (No code for example) is flawed.

You may get more people passing the exam (Or Upgrades), but active Hams will be still those who gets a kick out of talking around the world with a piece of wire. (It is in the DNA so to speak).

I am fortunate and blessed to have son at least pass for his Dad...Who knows, if he had to pass the code, he might have caught the "Bug" so to speak...And no, he will not learn to learn, he is goal driven, meaning get something in return, like a license, certificate, or A in the Grade.This drives him. After all he is only 12!

C U on the bands..

NN2X, Tom

 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9FV on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats to you and your son - sounds like a very motivated child. You did say "My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:" - is that 12 yrs old? And starting college full time next year? WOW - what an achievement. Has he planned his major yet?

Anyway - again, my congrats to you and your son.
Ken H>
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by W2MB on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
In my opinion, we place way to much effort in attracting youth to Amateur radio. Beyond showing what we do, I feel that we are wasting resources in our never ending attempt to attract youth. The bottom line is if one isn't interested in what we do, they're not interested in what we do. Self motivation by those that are interested in the aspects of communicating without wires is the true driver in becoming a ham.
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by W2MB on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
In my opinion, we waste way to much effort in attracting youth to Amateur radio. Beyond showing what we do, I feel that our never ending attempt to attract youth fails for basic reasons. The bottom line is if one isn't interested in what we do, they're not interested in what we do. Self motivation by those that are interested in the various aspects of communicating without wires is the true driver in becoming a ham.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by G8FXC on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
There are still a lot of hams who seem to think that the FCC (or OFCOM, or whatever the group of public servants responsible for radio licencing) exists to promote elitism in ham radio - it doesn't. The responsibility of the FCC or OFCOM is to protect spectrum users from interference by ensuring that everyone that operates a transmitter is sufficiently competent to do it in such a way that they do not cause unacceptable levels of interference.

We radio hams are a minor annoyance to them, not the focus of their working day. We pay little, if anything, for our licences (they are free on this side of the Atlantic) so we don't even cover our costs. Their focus is on commercial users of the spectrum who are actually profitable for them. There was a time when morse was commonly used on the HF bands and it made sense to require hams to have some passing competence in it in order that they should be able to understand if another station was trying to tell them to QSY. That time has gone - not even the military use CW on any regular basis - hence the need for hams to understand it is no longer. If the FCC have come to the conclusion that passing a relatively simple technical exam is sufficient to ensure that a prospective ham can operate their transmitters without interfering with other users, then there is no reason why they should impose more strict requirements.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KB6QXM on August 18, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
@all

Not only was code test and requirement to know, it acted as a filter to people that were not serious about becoming a ham. The elimination of code, the publishing of the test pool (for memorization) just waters down the hobby.

I know the talking points: We need to get the numbers up? Is that for more prospective ARRL members?

If we do not get the numbers up, we will lose spectrum. HF, I doubt it. It has no real technical value due to the wavelengths. Not even the shortwave broadcasters want it.

VHF/UHF. Maybe that spectrum is in jeopardy. The numbers not have a direct correlation to how many hams are actually active.

If you look at the demographics of the hobby, the median age of a ham radio operator is going up.

With HOAs and CC&Rs and that the youth of the world is no longer interested in radio communications for the most part, I really believe that amateur radio as we know it will be basically dead as the Baby Boomer generation dies off.

The ARRL with pushing contests and other activities will let this sputtering hobby last for a few more years, but for the most part 20-30 years and it will be a shell of what it is now.

I believe the next step will be a cry for a test-free license. The cost of radios etc are too much for the Millennial generation. They would not want to work for it anyways.

I am really happy that your son passed his technician class and I really hope that he enjoys the hobby and upgrades and learns morse code.

I am not an elitist. Just someone that has the courage to state the obvious about the hobby. I am glad you are mentoring your son about amateur radio. I have mentored many hams teaching Novice classes to other engineers in the Aerospace industry. Maybe the interest in amateur radio will spawn an interest in technology and a career in the field as radio did for me. I have enjoyed a long career in the Silicon Valley due to my interest in radio. As you may have read my BIO, I bought my first radio at the age of 11.

Good luck to you and your son and his future in amateur radio.

73
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by W9YW on August 20, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Getting young people interested is the best thing we can do, if we value the underlying fundamentals of radio communications as amateurs. The USA was wide open 200 years ago, a bit more crowded 100 years ago, and now it's shrinking. Commercial interests look at our spectrum and try to snack on it every chance they can get. Like land, God didn't invent more spectrum, just ways to tighten the modulation, and it's getting squeezed hard, every day.

The CW requirement was valid in its day. I passed Novice, then General, but couldn't do the General code, and let things languish for 40yrs. I'm a no-code Extra. So I went back and painstakingly got up to 20wpm. Fine.

That's not all I did, but that was MY standard.

Here's a young man that pleased his dad, and now has something useful that he may/not use the rest of his life. During my forty years in the desert I designed lots of stuff, installed it, wrote a dozen books, blah blah blah. This young man is an achiever. Many of us have also achieved great things in life, and I wish him the best in his journey. He seems diligent and honorable. That's why I got back into amateur radio-- some of the people are fantastic, others creative, and not one of them has no opinion, but they almost all uniformly are helpful and earnest individuals.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K6CRC on August 20, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats to your son. I hope he continues to learn and upgrade his license.

Neither of my sons can figure out why you need a Ham radio, when they can use Whatsapp on their iPhones and talk to any one on the planet in 5 seconds. Of course, I don't get the Gamers, and dislike much of their music.

Such is generational differences...
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on August 20, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
FXC...I think you summarized it best, no matter which side of the debate we view the current licensing requirements. Someone else mentioned the ARRL being numbers focused. Yes they are, and that’s life today everywhere. They can’t just represent a small number of code-required, tough-test licensees with any credibility. They’re hardly getting rich with our dues and selling books, but drop our numbers significantly, and we’re toast. I’ll admit to being the first one whose teeth starts grinding when I hear some of the ridiculously clueless things said on the air today, but that’s where grace begins, as well as being glad they’re actually using our bands. Being an “elite” with a powered-down station makes us nothing more than radio museum owners.

There are many, many bright and interesting people in our ranks... that’s the good news and fun part.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on August 20, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
FXC...I think you summarized it best, no matter which side of the debate we view the current licensing requirements. Someone else mentioned the ARRL being numbers focused. Yes they are, and that’s life today everywhere. They can’t just represent a small number of code-required, tough-test licensees with any credibility. They’re hardly getting rich with our dues and selling books, but drop our numbers significantly, and we’re toast. I’ll admit to being the first one whose teeth starts grinding when I hear some of the ridiculously clueless things said on the air today, but that’s where grace begins, as well as being glad they’re actually using our bands. Being an “elite” with a powered-down station makes us nothing more than radio museum owners.

There are many, many bright and interesting people in our ranks... that’s the good news and fun part.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9FV on August 20, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
"There are many, many bright and interesting people in our ranks... that’s the good news and fun part."

That is so true - amazing at the amount of knowledge is out there in ham land.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K6CRC on August 20, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
W9WY sez:
'Commercial interests look at our spectrum and try to snack on it every chance they can get. '

Likely the do, but not at the spectrum Hams use much. Few commercial interests care about 10M down. Really, what percentage of Hams use anything above 6M? UHF is dead here, even 2M is a ghost town except for a few small weekly nets.

Spectrum is precious. And, we do NOT own radio bands, we are given revocable rights to use it with set terms.

We don't use it, we deserve to lose it.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on August 21, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
To Ken (K9FV):

First, Thanks for kind comments towards my son (Adam)

Second to answer your questions

Adam is 12 years old and he will be going to college full time at 13 years old.

The college acceleration is a product of two points..Adam has been doing well in private school, however, the second point is just as important. In the State of Texas, you can have your child go to college, if you pass the 8th grade, and pass the TSI exam..

This is new concept, and the college curriculum is actually push down to the private schools, so the child will stay in their schools and be with other children who are doing the same. This is NOT Dual Credit, this is full time college program

Colleges, now are so slanted heavily politically, almost like a religion and introduction to drugs, alcohol, and other negative behavior is now pushed into not only colleges, but high school as well

So, the state Texas, has taken the college credit and program and forced the Universities to push unto a safe place.

This is a new program.

I love this concept, Young child completes BSEE degree(In this case) at 17 from a credited University, while being in a safe place without the slanted ideology, alcohol, drugs and the rest of it..!

Cheers

C U on the Bands, NN2X

 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by G3SEA on August 21, 2019 Mail this to a friend!

You did your best as a Dad and a Ham Tom.

You can bring them to the waterhole but you cannot make them drink :)

G3SEA/KH6
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K4EMF on August 21, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Much deserved congratulations to father and son for a job well done.

I was give or take 12 years old when I got my Novice in the early to mid 70's. Ham radio was one of the few things my dad and I did together without my 4 sisters tagging along.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by WM4RB on August 21, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Congratulations to your son. I know you are proud of your son. I too am a proud ham dad. My Daughter Emily, WE4MB Passed the Technician test at 8 years old, Passed the code at age 9 and at 10 years old passed the General and Extra at the same setting. During those years and several thereafter we traveled throughout the Southeastern US talking to young people about the joys of ham radio. In 2010 she was named the recipient of the ARRL Hiram Percy Maxim Memorial Award. She is 24 now and work has slowed her radio time down but she still enjoys the hobby.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by WM4RB on August 21, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I got the year wrong. it was for 2009 and presented in 2010.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9FV on August 21, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
NN2X: Thank you for the update with details of your son. That is interesting the way Texas handles that - I've mixed emotions about a young child being so far ahead of classmates, but the way it's being handled it seems ok. My youngest daughter was advanted a year and wound up almost 2 yrs younger than her classmates. Your plan keeps your son in the same age group which is best.

Really sounds like ya'll have a plan.

73 de Ken H> K9FV
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KB6QXM on August 22, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
God Bless the lone star state of Texas. Wish some of those educators would come clean up the mess here in California!
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on August 22, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Well, at least a lot of our universities are still good.
https://youtu.be/FlHrbixS7Ws
For what they cost, a little entertainment is good.
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K3YR on August 24, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Tom, congratulations to your son Adam for passing the Technician exam. I recently returned to ham radio after a 40-year absence from the hobby; I had a Novice license back in the late 1970s but I let it lapse. In early June, I sat for my Technician exam, and then spent every waking hour studying like heck and managed to pass my General and Extra exams in early July. Like you, I have a 12-year old son. He lives with my ex-wife, about 10 minutes away from my home, and though I see him almost every day, I feel that we don't have the same connection that we used to have when he lived in my home. So, I asked him to study with me so he could take the Technician exam license on the same day I took my General exam.

He studied, and we reviewed together. Believe me, as Tom and Adam know, it's not a matter of just signing your name on the paper. My son is a smart kid and gets As in school, but he's a 7th grader - he has not yet been taught the algebra, square roots, logarithms and other high school math that appears on the exam. And you still need to learn Ohm's Law, and the Doppler Effect, both of which are high-school level physics; plus circuits and components, FCC rules and RF safety. My son plays banjo, clarinet and piano, so I taught him that in music, harmonics are good (they lend richness to the tones we hear) but in radio, not so much. Harmonics: music good, radio bad.

Yes, the Technician exam is much, much easier than the General and Extra exams. (Man, the knowledge base for the Extra exam is difficult). But I reckon today's Technician exam is a bit harder than the Novice exam I took in the 1970s, because there is so much more to learn. 5WPM code isn't difficult, but for the Novice license back in the day we didn't have to learn about MPE limits, nor digital modes, nor VHF/UHF operations and so many other developments in ham radio since the 1970s.

Anyway, I watched my son, over the course of several weeks of study and review with me, gradually improve his scores on the practice exams until finally exam day came for both of us and we both passed. He's now licensed as KC3NTC.

The real issue is the one K6CRC raised in his comment. My son studied for and passed the exam because I asked him to do it and he understood that it was important for me and for our relationship. But now that he has his license, he can't imagine what good it does. Like K6CRC said, my son knows that he can talk to anybody he wants, anywhere in the world, using WhatsApp, Discord, Instagram, and any number of other protocols. Without a license, without static, without worrying about SWR and RF exposure, without expensive equipment. Just the other day, I suggested that we go out to the park and take our HTs to stay in touch if he's fishing while I'm kayaking - and he asked "but why wouldn't we just use our cellphones?" I gave some lame answer about not wanting to risk dropping my iPhone in the river, but I have to say - he has a point.

My son is interested in computers, and he says he'd like to design and build computers. So he recognizes the value of what he learned about circuits, about transistors and other components. But ham radio is about radio, and about QSOs, and the real question is how to motivate younger people to get interested in the radio hobby itself when they have so many other simpler means for communicating.

I encourage my son to sit with me while I'm on the air, but it would be helpful for him to see (and hear) more teens and pre-teens on the air if he's going to get motivated - a 12-year old boy is not exactly excited with the idea of a rag chew with men his father's age or older. Or for him to find a way that ham radio can be relevant to his life and his interests, not just my life and my interests.

So special thanks to K8ZT for posting the links to resources for young hams. Any other ideas about how to motivate him to get involved and use his license would be most appreciated. I know that if he finds something of relevance in this hobby, if he discovers some entry point that resonates with his life and interests, he will eventually get hooked and find lifelong satisfaction in the hobby.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K3YR on August 24, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Thanks for posting these links.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on August 25, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
To KC3NTC (Christopher) & KC3NQE (Herbert)

Congrats two both of you passing the Tech license!

Herbert you were a Ham before, congrats to coming back to the greatest hobby on earth!

About the young kids entering Ham radio.

I tried this approach...I tell them I am using a piece of wire, and a bunch of discrete electronic components, and communicate around the world, with no need for another other telecom infrastructure.

When I compare with Internet, and the various protocols (Like WhatsUP, Skype and the rest of them, to Ham radio, I indicate there are billions of dollars of hardwired telecom infrastructure, performs these communications.

I say to them I am only using a 32FT piece of wire, and $300 radio you can work the world.

I found that if the child does not get a kick out of that demonstration, then all bets are off..

It has to be in the DNA...

For the record, my son (Adam / KI5FJE), when I showed him this wonderful demonstration, he did not get the buzz! (I wish he did)

Anyway, Adam does like girls. I told him he can only speak to girls through Ham radio (I am joking of course, but that would do it!), Ironically, his first QSO was with a young girl around the same age in the UK ( AnneMarie 2E0RUX of the Cornwall region of England ! (2 Meters)


C U on the bands..

NN2X, Tom
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on August 25, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
To WM4RB (Michael) & WE4MB (Emily)

Michael, Wow, that is incredible about your daughter (WE4MB / Emily)..What an achievement, by 8 years old passing, and 10 years old passing the Extra class (And General) at the same setting!Emily definitely deserved the Hiram Percy Memorial Award

I noted Emily is busy with a young family (Noted on her web page), that will keep you busy!

Well, wish my luck with my son (Adam / KI5FJE), I expose Ham radio to him once in a while, just to keep his interest up, but now he is full throttle in school

Cheers

C U Then and thanks for the kind comments

NN2X, Tom


 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KD8NGE on August 31, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
As we lead, so shall they follow: the father models a behavior, and the son absorbs that lesson: I credit my status as a published author to a love of reading, a love that my father modeled.
Congratulations to your son, he has achieved where others have not even tried: he was not simply given that certification, he EARNED it, by his own efforts.
Let none tell you otherwise.
It is my experience that when a man acquires a licensure or a certification, even if seldom or never used, it enriches the whole man.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on August 31, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I’ll throw this one into the discussion, because I think it’s as important as any academic achievement. Doing accelerated academics is fine, but as a parent and role model, you must also stress the character and emotional development of your child. Being intelligent and gifted is only one component of his future success, and I’d even argue that it’s not even the most important. Involving them in activities and especially sports, where they learn to work together, socially interact, and realize that if they’ve got a role in the success or failure of their group, is so important. No child is going to become a productive, well-adjusted teen and adult if all they’ve been told they’re the brightest, and their future depends upon going to this advanced school, that accelerated program, and that’s it. You’ll have a bright, introverted, anxiety-filled adult who can’t get along with others as an end-product. There’s a reason why humans go through seasons of life, including adolescence which is probably the most critical....they’re observing, learning, and interacting.....and it’s a process and it takes time.

AP classes are great...I did them back in the day, and so did our son. Yes, and find a great school to challenge him, but make sure you’re also exposing him to those things in life that will enrich his total well-being, not just academics.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on August 31, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
"I love this concept, Young child completes BSEE degree(In this case) at 17 from a credited University, while being in a safe place without the slanted ideology, alcohol, drugs and the rest of it..!"

I'm sorry Tom, that's insane. Age 17 with a degree from an ACCREDITED university, so them what? He'll have a whole, big nasty world to deal with no matter what you try to do to isolate him from it. YOU teach values to your child so they will know their own way. It's even in the Bible, if you're so inclined. Seriously man, rethink this.

 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KN6SD on September 3, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
You make a valid point. We (Hams) don't need licensee's that have no interest in the Amateur Service.

I've been pushing the idea for a License Free service, lets call it CB 2.0.. Something around 49 MHz or 70 MHz, 25 to 40 channels, 10 to 25 watts output, Narrow FM, SSB, and a couple of Packet channels... NO Repeaters, just simple simplex communications for both voice and digital modes.. Radio as a "Tool", not a hobby..

I know about GMRS, and it hasn't really caught on with the public.. One barrier is the lack of range without a repeater, the other is no Packet channels..

I bet kids with love to play around with their own wireless neighborhood data network just to get their feet wet with Tech...

Just my 2 cents on the subject.

73,
Russ
KN6SD
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 4, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
K9MHZ

Things have changed...Let me give you some stats

1. 164 people die each day from drugs, most exposed in High School and College

2. 64% of women have child out of wedlock (This is under 30 years old, in USA). Most of the wedlock occurs during the college years. A point of reference in 1962 (Only 8% of our entire population had children out of wedlock) / The are other stats here, but I will leave at this.


3. The ideology in the colleges are extremely slanted towards the left...(But I can live with this, although I am conservative)


There are more stats that are quite frankly I am not ready to post on this ham web site...But not positive stats for the Universities and Public High Schools.

I do the demographic analysis, and the stats...You just don't want to know...

Adam (My son) is in private school, 4;1 ratio, and private tutoring. And all teachings, are video and audio recordings.

Yes, when Adam gets older, he will be exposed to all the good and evil of this world, but not at an age when he should be learning, playing, and having a QSO!

When Adam is tooled with education, values and principles are set in stone, then he can go on his journey, but I will not allow him to be in environment at such a tender age, to be exposed to the typical environments of a typical high school and college.

I am not an isolated person, I lived in or short stays of 70 countries. My point being I not one of those who head is stuck in the sand. I just know the stats, and our public Schools and Universities, it is not pretty...

The above reasons is why I have my son (Adam) entering the college early, (In private school)rather than be exposed to the college environment.

Note: Only 13% of the US population has BS degree from a regional credited university / college

You will see 25%, however, 12% are from national accredited...That is a different standard...

Wish me luck..

And thanks for all the positive responses..


C U on the bands

NN2X, Tom


 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on September 4, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Tom,

I completely get your concerns. But your son will still need to be able to interact with the real world, warts and all. My son is finishing up at a large, very respected university, with a comp sci degree. Throughout, we monitoring those things you’ve mentioned, and it became clear that a well-parented, young person of faith, majoring in a challenging STEM program will be too busy to become indoctrinated or engage in the nasty stuff. If they’re in a group activity (eg. he’s in a Big 10 marching band), that will really help. He’ll form lifelong bonds, and ESPECIALLY know how to deal with people! Major aerospace firms hire right from their Student Union twice a year, and are heavily involved with research grants, internships, and provide lots of research endowment money to the engineering, comp sci, ag, you name it, school teaching their line of work. Finally, he’ll be 22 at graduation, not 18....a huge difference.

Tom, for the sake of your child’s future, at least do your parenting diligence and look at what’s offered. To your point, I would have never allowed him to go to UC Berkeley, for example, not on my dime at least. But it’s not as starkly contrasted or binary as you seem to believe.

Best,
Brad
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K0RGR on September 6, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Congrats to the new ham! I hope that in the future, you will pursue more ham activities.

Indeed, that's the real reason we need to work with kids today - to expose them to the hobby, not in order to get them licensed right away. At some point in the future, we will see some of those kids who learned about the hobby ages ago come back. That's what we're getting now - people who didn't have time to do it decades ago, or those who didn't want to learn the code (or couldn't).

My son has his license, and did SKYWARN for a while, but he's got lots of excuses for not doing it now. I doubt he will ever be active. I have taught a lot of other kids, though, that are active. Yes, radio is in the DNA, but it often doesn't surface until people are older.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KC7MF on September 7, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
This thread is old so I doubt many will read it but here goes.

The comments about "kids today" are not much different than I am sure my parents were making 50 years ago when the counter culture was all the rage. We boomers went to colleges that were hotbeds of counterculture and we turned out, for the most part, fine. Despite the predictions of gloom and doom the US did not turn into a communist country. It did not become socialist. It has continued to elect conservative candidates for office at all levels including in California; the easy target for right wing snipers.

I work with college students every day and can tell you that they are politically all over the map. They are not being indoctrinated by their professors one bit more now than I was 'back in the day'. Liberal or conservative, colleges always are a concern to their local community because it is their job to expose kids to all political views. And they do. And it is the "job" of young people to try on various ideologies and find their own fit. On an individual basis they are not particularly "liberal" or "conservative" when at school or shortly thereafter. They are issue driven.

What is frightening are the people who believe that kids should automatically accept one particular orthodoxy or another. One does not go to college to become "the same". They come to be educated. And they are. It is astonishing the information and depth of knowledge these kids have these days.

We forget but when we geezers were in school, to learn something we went to the library and sought the answer in books. Often there were very limited sources for our information. Today these students have access to literally everything out there on the subject...cataloged and instantly. It is more important for them to learn to vet the sources than to memorize the information. In other words, they can know, on any given subject, vastly more than we could have known then. And know it in a form that can't be "forgotten".

So for those who are frightened that their son or daughter has to read Marx in sociology just remember that we did too. But unlike us, one or two books won't cut it. Their research takes them into the corners of political philosophy from ANTIFA to the arch conservative. And just like us, they make their choices.

I deal mostly with folks heading for medicine. They are not being indoctrinated. They are facing though challenges that we didn't. Massive student debt being just one. The shear volume of science they are expected to know dwarfs what we did in the 60's or 70's. And they face an uncertain future just like we did. Of course their view has to be 60 years. We are the ones who have the luxury of a 20 year (or less) event horizon.

So cut them some slack. Many ask me about Ham radio but remember that these kids don't have time for any hobbies that require considerable preparation. Someday they will. They live differently from us. The day of the starter home is pretty much out of the reach of the average young worker. They rent....no antennas. They live with mom and dad....no antennas. They often work more than one job just to make ends meet. The minimum wage is 1968 would be $12.00 per hour in today's dollars. And it is far from that. Many college grads would be happy with $12.00 per hour.

I know, because I am a geezer, how easy it is to think that we had it "harder" than they do. We didn't. In most ways we had it pretty much easier than they did. But it really doesn't matter. What matters is that we present ourselves as a welcoming and caring group of people who will be ready to help them enjoy this great hobby when they are ready to change.

And for God's sake stop sounding like a radio talk show host. The sky is not falling in our colleges and universities. They are just like we left them. Unlike our communities they do not have a dominant political view. Sure you will not have a conversation at an Alabama bar about socialism but you will have it at an Alabama university. Why? Because it is the job of the university to teach all ways of thinking. They seem left in a right wing community but how do you think Liberty University plays in New York?

The kids are fine. Amazing really. They are our hope for the future and as one who works with them all of the time I will tell you, the future is in good hands. And so is ham radio.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on September 11, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
^^^^ Yeah, and I’ll add one quick thought, and give it a rest. Kids come from all over the world to attend our universities for one reason.... on the whole, ours are still the best on the planet. The foreign kids are not becoming politically indoctrinated because they’re here to learn something productive, and that generally means working for a STEM degree and getting it done. Our focused kids are the same way. The elements that get all of the notice and press are not researching in labs or learning to engineer the next great thing.

(The horse is almost dead) But any young person....liberal, conservative, STEM major, gender studies major, whatever....must learn to effectively deal with colleagues and the world in general. Cocooning your child because of your own fears and anxieties is a prescription for disaster.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 13, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I am original person for this post..

Thanks for all the responses.

One point, I think is totally missed

About my son going to early college program

Although my son will be taking the college curriculum, it is being administered with his peers...in a "Normal" Class room for children / at a private school.

We (USA) kept lowering our standards in education, the USA is now ranked 32nd in the world

While colleges also kept lowering their standards (Especially to enter)

Meanwhile private schools kept raising their standards..Now we have a situation, that private schools at 8th grade (Completion) is enough to enter college..

But the difference, is the curriculum (College) is now being administered at the private school facility.

In summary, a 17 or 18 year old has a BSEE degree..from a regional accredited University..(Note, there are some time required at the University, but only a few courses, which is towards the end of the 4 year degree.

I hope all understands, that my son, is just taking the college curriculum at the private school

C U all on the Bands...

NN2X
Tom
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9FV on September 13, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Tom, what you've explained in your last post is exactly what I got from your other posts. College courses at the local high school (private). Good luck to your son with his college work.

On your other points about the lowering of standards for public schools - 100% agreed. This "no child left behind" was one of the worse things to ever happen to our young folks. "IF" it were possible to bring the slowest learner up to the faster learners ability it would be good, but folks have different learning abilities. The "no child left behind" mess simply held back the faster learners to the slowest learner's speed which is NOT what is desired.

Sorry to seem to rant, but that schooling is one of my "rant" topics.

73 de Ken H> K9FV

 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9MHZ on September 14, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
"In summary, a 17 or 18 year old has a BSEE degree..from a regional accredited University..(Note, there are some time required at the University, but only a few courses, which is towards the end of the 4 year degree."

Tom, what university is doing that? Is it an ABET accredited full-up engineering curriculum, and not an Associate's or engineering technology program?

Real BSEE taught in high school...never heard of that.

 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 14, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
K9MHZ

This is a brand new program in Texas...

How it works...

The 1st 2 years is from Collin Creek College, and 90% is taught online, however, administered and taught at the private school..

This is an associate degree in Science

The next is the University, called

University of Dallas Texas (Regionally Accredited)

UDT accept 100% of the Credits, from Collin Creek College, which means only 2 years to complete the BSEE.

90% of the UDT program is online, and administered through the private school

AGAIN...this is brand new program In Texas...

What else is nice THERE IS NO NEED TO PASS THE SAT or ACT exam required.

However, the student has to pass the TSI exam and have completed the 8Th Grade..

And again this would not be possible, unless the public schools had continually lowered the standards, and private school kept raising their standards..And of course the Colleges had to keep lowering their stands..

What do you get? 8Th grade student from a private school is equivalent to HS diploma..

This is a result of government as a solution, rather than private sector...

FYI...At 17 Years Old with a BSEE...If my son desires to enter in Masters for another well known University, I believe it will be easier with a BSEE in hand..However, this is only my assumption

Cheers

Tom NN2X

 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KC7MF on September 15, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
Forgive me for asking but clarify something for me.

You said "Collin Creek College". There is no such college. Are you talking about the Spring Creek College which is part of the Collin College group?

Also.

The University of Dallas is a private Roman Catholic school. It does not offer a BSEE degree but has a pre professional program. It does offer a five year dual degree program with UTA so that the student gets a physics degree from UD and a BSEE from UTA.

I mean no offense but I think you are confused. There is no UD program like you describe. Is your son's private school a Catholic school? Or are you speaking of University of Texas, Dallas?

I am also concerned about the assertion that an 8th grade level in a private school is equivalent to a high school diploma. While some students in every school, including public ones, perform way above grade level the notion that 8th grade in a private school is universally equivalent to a high school diploma is simply nonsense.

Here we go slamming kids again. I would suggest that the curriculum that they face does not much resemble what we faced 50+ years ago. Thank God. Equipped with the same skills that we were when we graduated from high school today's student could not function at the college level. What they need to know is simply not the same stuff as we needed to know. Most particularly in the sciences.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 15, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
KC7MF

Here is the 4 Degree program for the BSEE

https://www.utdallas.edu/academics/degrees/

LOOK AT BSEE...

The 2 Year Program is

https://www.collin.edu/academics/programs/FOS_Elec_1Overview.html

I hope this clears it up...For you..

Adam (My son) will attend to 2 year program first...

Collin College...And then attend UTD...

Note: Most is online...And will be administered, through the private school...

Cheers

NN2X, Tom
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 15, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
KC7MF

Here is the 4 Degree program for the BSEE

https://www.utdallas.edu/academics/degrees/

LOOK AT BSEE...

The 2 Year Program is

https://www.collin.edu/academics/programs/FOS_Elec_1Overview.html

I hope this clears it up...For you..

Adam (My son) will attend to 2 year program first...

Collin College...And then attend UTD...

Note: Most is online...And will be administered, through the private school...


About your quote:

"I am also concerned about the assertion that an 8th grade level in a private school is equivalent to a high school diploma. While some students in every school, including public ones, perform way above grade level the notion that 8th grade in a private school is universally equivalent to a high school diploma is simply nonsense"

Sorry, I lived in or short stays of 70 countries, and performed the demographic analysis for each country..

It is not the kids that can't learn, it is the constant lowering the standards, student teacher ratio (30:1). I think you might recall,..NO KIDS LEFT BEHIND)..Ok, how do you do this..? Lower the standards so all can pass..Simple.

Anyway, bottom line, no matter the cause, USA is ranked 32nd in the world, yes we spend more the any other country for education...(Government run, what do you expect?)

You can Google that fact...

Private schools are not all good (But you can go to another private school (Choice / powerful tool).

My son went to private school, which was 4:1 ratio...With this attention, there is a custom design to the child abilities, and level...It works...Not all that expensive by the way, (15K per year)

The children attending this private school, which is (4:1) / Teacher / student ratio are all average intelligent students...Any child can handle the work load in studies.. When you have 30:1, you can't provide adequate attention. And in Texas, we have many bilingual students, which flood the schools.. Add that to the equations and you find the teachers being overwhelmed.

I went to public schools myself, I am not saying you can do well, what I am saying is the private schools are accountable for results.

Our system in the USA (Public Education) the Teachers are in a Union. Traveling the world and again performing the demographic analysis, I found a common trait about the Unions...

Unions, in general, suppresses the ambitious, protect the lazy,and instill a sense of entitlement, and lack of accountability.Normally

As stated, USA is ranked 32nd in the world for education, and people wonder why 8Th grade student in a private school can be as good a High School graduate in our public school


Cheers

NN2X, Tom
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 15, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
K9MHZ

We have to take this off line

But let me answer you...As you seem not to believe me

"Tom, what university is doing that? Is it an ABET accredited full-up engineering curriculum, and not an Associate's or engineering technology program?

Real BSEE taught in high school...never heard of that".

You never heard of it...because it is NEW program

Sorry, In Texas, we have this..

Anyway...My email is twrightsatellite@gmail.com

I will give you 1000% of the program...Step by Step...Point of contact, schools, and Yes the BSEE is regional accredited..

Welcome to private schools!
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by KC7MF on September 16, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I agree. Let's take this offline. We are off topic anyway.

And I have no intention of participating in an a thinly veiled attempt to bash school teachers and preach a right wing agenda on a hobby forum. Your comments about public school teachers being substandard because you imagine some nonsense about unions is rude and simply wrong. Thank God for public school teachers. The us did not become as great a country as it is because of elite private schools.

I also disagree with your overbroad characterization of the US education as far down the list. We must be magnificently lucky to have the best Universities, best R & D and greatest innovation in the world all the while falling behind such research powerhouses as well you pick the country. Insert eye roll here.

Ham radio for me is a hobby. If you wish to forward a political agenda please do it somewhere else and let the rest of us enjoy our hobby without every forum turning into a referendum on one political belief or another.

Cheers.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by NN2X on September 16, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
KC7MF

Universities are the best...But Private for the most part...Hence the quality...

Lets enjoy Ham radio...I agree,,

FYI Not bashing the teachers, bashing the system of Unions...

CU on you the bands..

NN2X...And wish my son luck, taking the GROL license in a few weeks..

NN2X.
 
RE: Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K9FV on September 16, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
OK folks, I know at times the exchange got "almost" a tad testy, but I have enjoyed the exchange and have learned some things from reading the links provided. Especially on the topic of "Regional" vs "National" certification of colleges. Off the cuff I would have thought "National" would have carried the most weight. Reading I find "Regional" certification is the certification used by mainstream colleges and carries LOTS more weight.

Thanks again two both of ya'll for the education.

73 de Ken H> K9FV
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by N2NH on September 23, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
That is quite a feat. Now I see some who believe that things were better once upon a time. Not always. Code has its place, heck I passed my code and for a time did 35WPM. But these are the good old days. Passing the Tech is great at that age and starting that young gives him decades more than someone who is 35 when they pass it (as I was). I tried at 13, but couldn't cut the mustard then, so I know how great that accomplishment is. It will also be good that he has a Father that is a Ham too.

Kudos! Hope to catch you on the air.
 
Experiment: My Son 12 Years Passed Tech:  
by K0RGR on October 8, 2019 Mail this to a friend!
I wish I knew the answer to how to get young people to actually use the license once they've got it. My son got his at 13, with great difficulty, and he's only used it a bit for SKYWARN, and not even that for quite a few years.

There are really cool aspects of this hobby, which too many newbies don't get acquainted with. HF is one aspect, but sadly, that's a dying art. It's becoming too difficult for kids to get on HF these days.

Likewise, satellites are really cool, and anybody can use them, but too few newbies get to see them, particularly the SSB birds, which are the easiest to use, but require the most expensive gear.

The ageing of the hobby is it's own problem. With nobody to talk to but ancient fossils like us, kids lose interest too fast.

All we can do is keep showing them what you can do, and hope that something sticks.
 
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