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News Articles

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Far Side of the Moon Photographed by Amateurs:
by camras.nl on November 21, 2018
This image shows the far side of the Moon, as well as our own planet Earth. It was taken with a camera linked to an amateur radio transceiver on board the Chinese DSLWP-B / Longjiang-2 satellite (call sign BJ1SN), currently in orbit around the Moon, and transmitted back to Earth where it was received with the Dwingeloo Telescope. This image represents the culmination of several observing sessions spread over the past few months where we used the Dwingeloo telescope in collaboration with the Chinese team from Harbin University of Technology, who build the radio transceiver on board Longjiang-2, and radio amateurs spread across the globe.

Robert Wareham, N0ESQ, Appointed as Rocky Mountain Division Vice Director:
by W1AW Bulletin via the ARRL on November 20, 2018
ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, has named Robert Wareham, N0ESQ, of Highlands Ranch, Colorado, as Rocky Mountain Division Vice Director. Wareham will serve the remaining term of Jeff Ryan, K0RM, who assumed the position of Rocky Mountain Director upon the resignation of Dwayne Allen, WY7FD.

ARRL Director, Vice Director Election Results Announced:
by W1AW Bulletin via the ARRL on November 20, 2018
ARRL has announced the results of contested elections for Director and Vice Director. Ballots were opened and counted on November 16 in seven contests within five ARRL Divisions.

Ham Operators Communicate Behind Scenes on National Network:
by triblive.com on November 20, 2018
In a crisis, communication is vital and during some natural disasters, there is no telephone service or internet access. However, our community is fortunate to have a network of emergency help: people who can communicate without needing electricity. They are “hams,” or amateur radio operators. They participate in a national traffic net that passes messages across the country. They communicate on certain frequencies using different types of radios, including hand-held. Equipment includes radios, antennas, amplifiers, antenna tuners and more. Various vendors can be contacted for new products, supplies and equipment. The late legendary CBS newsman Walter Cronkite was a member of the national association for amateur radio. Dozens of radio amateurs were vital to the police, fire departments and emergency services during the aftermath of 9/11. In addition, “hams” have helped with sea rescues, wildfires, space communication and other situations.

Ham Radio Operators Answer Call:
by journalgazette.net on November 20, 2018
In disasters, they can make a difference, but hobby needs youth: When disaster strikes somewhere in the world, ham radio operators are uniquely qualified to assist with communications. Their battery, solar and generator-run equipment works even when cellphones, landlines and broadcast towers are out of commission. That's why ham radio operators sometimes arrive with the first responders after hurricanes and earthquakes. But that rough-and-ready crew is struggling with its own serious situation: Aging amateur radio operators worry that not enough young people are getting involved to keep the hobby thriving. That's the most common concern Rick Roderick hears when he attends ham radio conventions across the country in his role as president of ARRL, the national association for amateur radio. The organization represents about 180,000 of the 750,000 ham radio operators in the U.S.

A Sunspot from the Next Solar Cycle:
by spaceweather.com on November 20, 2018
Over the weekend, a small sunspot materialized in the sun's northern hemisphere, then, hours later, vanished again. Such an occurrence is hardly unusual during solar minimum when sunspots are naturally small and short-lived. However, this ephemeral spot was noteworthy because its magnetic field was reversed--marking it as a member of the next solar cycle.

From Technical to Social Aspects, Ham Radios Have Something for Everyone:
by journalgazette.net on November 19, 2018
When disaster strikes somewhere in the world, ham radio operators are uniquely qualified to assist with communications. Their battery, solar and generator-run equipment works even when cellphones, landlines and broadcast towers are out of commission. That's why ham radio operators sometimes arrive with the first responders after hurricanes and earthquakes. But that rough-and-ready crew is struggling with its own serious situation: Aging amateur radio operators worry that not enough young people are getting involved to keep the hobby thriving.

New Version of WSJT-X:
by RSGB on November 19, 2018
A new WSJT-X release candidate, version 2.0.0-rc4, now is available, and the version 2.0 quick start Guide has been revised and extended. The developers urge any one upgrading to the new version to read the release notes thoroughly.

Ham Radio Operators Tune In:
by thehindu.com on November 18, 2018
With Cyclone Gaja hurtling towards Cuddalore and Pamban around Nagapattinam, Ham radio operators from Bengaluru and Kollam in Kerala are in Cuddalore district for transmission of information from base stations to government departments. The district administration has set up the Ham Radio Communication Headquarters on the Collectorate campus. Four operators from the Bangalore Amateur Radio Club, who arrived on Thursday, are stationed at the Collectorate while another group from Kollam-based Active Hams Amateur Radio Society has been sent to Chidambaram as a precautionary measure. The team from Active Hams Amateur Radio Society recently participated in the Kerala flood rescue operations and transmitted emergency communication during floods.

Fair Lawn ARC Completes Antenna Upgrades as Member Growth Reaches New High:
by tapinto.net on November 17, 2018
FAIR LAWN, NJ -- The Fair Lawn Amateur Radio Club recently completed the first phase of a two-year program to upgrade its station capabilities as its membership base continues to grow. The club, now in its 63rd year, is sponsored by the Borough of Fair Lawn and meets weekly on Friday evenings at 6PM at the Fair Lawn Community Center at 10-10 20th Street in Fair Lawn. Its lauded monthly speaker series meets on the third Friday of every month at the Fair Lawn Senior Center, 11-05 Gardiner Road. "Our antennas did not meet the need of the club to operate successfully in contests, events or assist in our public service role," club president Brad Kerber, said. "Half of the antennas either did not operate properly due to age. Our two towers needed inspections and maintenance performed that was not being done. We made some improvements to the previous installation and took no shortcuts to make sure the work being done will last."

Former ARRL Headquarters Book Team Supervisor Jan Carman, K5MA (SK):
by W1AW Bulletin via the ARRL on November 16, 2018
R. Jan Carman, K5MA (ex-W5SBX, W3JXS), who was a member of the ARRL Headquarters staff from 2001 until 2003 died on November 13. An ARRL Life Member, he was 76.

Propagation Forecast Bulletin #46 de K7RA:
by W1AW Bulletin via the ARRL on November 16, 2018
A single sunspot appeared on November 13-14, yielding a daily sunspot number of 11 over both days. The sunspot number increased to 13 on the following day, November 15. The average daily sunspot number for the reporting week (November 8-14) was 3.1, after no sunspots during the previous seven days.

How Radio Operators Could Save Lives In an Emergency and How You Can Help:
by svvoice.com on November 16, 2018
Santa Clara’s amateur radio group doesn’t get a lot of recognition, but if another major earthquake ever hits the Bay Area, the small group could be the difference between life and death. “I consider them to be an extremely valuable asset,” said Lisa Schoenthal, the City of Santa Clara’s Emergency Services Coordinator. “During times of catastrophic emergency, [ham radios] have been the only mode of communication.” In April of 2015, an earthquake in Nepal killed nearly 9,000 people and injured nearly 22,000 more. A year later at a talk in Santa Clara, Dr. Sanjeeb Panday from Nepal talked to local amateur radio operators about the vital role hams played in mobilizing emergency services. The quake knocked out power and internet in much of Nepal. Since amateur radios run on batteries and do not rely on internet connectivity, they were still able to communicate after the earthquake. Amateur radio also made a difference in Puerto Rico during 2017’s Hurricane Maria. The hurricane knocked out cell towers. Amateur radios do not rely on cell towers, so they were a natural choice for communication following the disaster. These two emergencies made Santa Clara more aware of how vital ham radio operators are to the City’s safety.

Resident's Radio Tower Request Upsets Neighbors Who Say It Would Be Eyesore
by daytondailynews.com on November 16, 2018
A Kettering resident wants to put up an amateur radio tower on property along Mad River Road and some residents who live on the road don’t want the tower built in their neighborhood. More than 30 people who live in the neighborhood submitted a petition to the Kettering Board of Zoning Appeals Monday night at a hearing to discuss the issue. Wynn Rollert, 77, has requested approval to be granted a variance on his property in the 4800 block of Mad River Road in order to install a 50-foot tower in the rear of his yard. Kettering’s Zoning Code allows for amateur radio towers to be 25-feet without a variance, so that is why he wants approval for the extra 25-feet. Rollert has been a ham operator and amateur radio enthusiast since 1952 he said Monday night. He said he would like to use commercial-grade equipment including the UHF/VHF frequency tower for two-to-three hours a day to communicate with other ham operators at remote sites especially during emergency situations.

Foundations of Amateur Radio #180:
by Onno VK6FLAB on November 16, 2018
KS5I who has been around the block a couple of times. He recalls the excitement he experienced when he was first licensed in 1967, the year I was born.


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Manager - AB7RG
Clinton Herbert (AB7RG) Please submit any Amateur Radio related news or stories that you would like to see, here on eHam.net. If you need any help, we are glad to assist you with writing your article based on the information you supply. If there are any problems please let me know. (This includes any inappropriate posts on a topic, as I cannot monitor every topic.) Sincerely 73 de Clinton Herbert, AB7RG