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Author Topic: QSL Filing  (Read 4603 times)
AL7KC
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« Reply #15 on: November 30, 2017, 10:54:21 AM »

I use a Steelmaster 2-drawer 4x6 card file cabinet.  I'm very happy with it, works great, holds thousands of cards, and can expand by stacking more if additional space is needed later.  I sort by DXCC, then by number.

https://www.amazon.com/SteelMaster-263F4616DBLA-Drawer-Cabinet-Holds/dp/B00006IFEH

« Last Edit: November 30, 2017, 11:00:04 AM by AL7KC » Logged
VA3VF
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Posts: 936




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« Reply #16 on: November 30, 2017, 03:08:54 PM »

G3TXF's website has a picture of this nice package method, (picture taken under construction), for his QSL cards:

Oh, yeah, he also shows some really nifty metal filing cabinets in that package! See http://www.g3txf.com/QSL-Office/QSL-Off.html


I only saw this thread today. I thought you were joking!

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EI2GLB
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« Reply #17 on: November 30, 2017, 03:18:42 PM »

See Nigel has started to scan and then bin the qsls



http://www.g3txf.com/dxtrip/Scan-Bin-QSLs/Bin-QSLs.html
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VA3VF
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« Reply #18 on: November 30, 2017, 03:22:52 PM »

See Nigel has started to scan and then bin the qsls



http://www.g3txf.com/dxtrip/Scan-Bin-QSLs/Bin-QSLs.html

Noooooooooo.....
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WO7R
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« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2017, 09:50:46 AM »

We all need to make a serious inventory of these things as we age.  We are doing our kids and heirs a disservice if we just hold on to this stuff "forever".  We had an excellent discussion at our DX club last year about a guy who got caught up in several ham estate sales.  It was not a pretty discussion.  The families literally do not know what to do and could easily be taken to the cleaners by the unscrupulous.  The more we accumulate, the less able our heirs will be to know what is valuable and what is not.

There are all too believable discussions of #1 Honor Roll plaques ending up in the garbage before the now silent key is even buried.  To be followed, no doubt, by extensive QSL card collections.

Separately:  My parents, now deceased alas, did one very commendable thing over the last 20 or so years of their lives.

They disposed of things. 

It took them a long while and there were several iterations.  But, they saved us weeks and months of work and, by the way, probably got whatever value was still available.

Just this last week, we dispersed the last of their worldly goods to family members.  What remained was mostly furniture, and it fit in a single 10x10 storage bin.

This from what originally was a largish two story house full of furniture, knick-knacks, and books.

I just literally gave away the last of the books that my mother had carefully preserved.  It was only two boxes worth by then.  Turns out that even the local used book store no longer wanted them.  I was surprised that some of them (e.g. "The Annotated Sherlock Holmes" and Bruce Caton's civil war series) were rejected.  Some, I was not so surprised about.  I did find a place to take them as a donation, but their ultimate fate is probably the recycle bin.

Maybe some of my folks' furniture will ultimately make their way to the antiques market.  They are currently serving my parents' grandchildren, but will inevitably make their way to the sidelines when said grandkids get a better living and want their own stuff.  It will not be, in any of their cases, Early American furniture.

Not a great deal of money was raised by all of this winnowing, though it was something.  But, trust me, it was a lot less heartbreaking to see a relatively small lot go by the wayside and to know that we were dealing with the small bit that really mattered.

20 year old JA QSLs are really not what is going to matter.
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VA3VF
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« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2017, 10:05:47 AM »

We all need to make a serious inventory of these things as we age.  We are doing our kids and heirs a disservice if we just hold on to this stuff "forever".

My parents did the same when they moved from a big house to a small condo, and when they sold the summer home.

In my case, books, rather than hamradio equipment, will be the 'problem'. But nothing the blue bin cannot handle, if it comes to that.

Most of the QSLs disposed of were likely garden variety stuff, but some must have been worthy of preservation, and I don't mean in digital form.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 10:10:36 AM by VA3VF » Logged
N3QE
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« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2017, 10:57:19 AM »

Most of the QSLs disposed of were likely garden variety stuff, but some must have been worthy of preservation, and I don't mean in digital form.

I think the ones shown in the pictures are all recent, after he went to the "OQRS only please I do not need your paper card" policy.

The true storage costs for properly storing paper documents on low or unknown quality paper are actually quite high.

And when he gets around to scanning the older cards it will be a huge service if he can make them available on the interweb.
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VA3VF
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« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2017, 11:30:27 AM »

Most of the QSLs disposed of were likely garden variety stuff, but some must have been worthy of preservation, and I don't mean in digital form.

I think the ones shown in the pictures are all recent, after he went to the "OQRS only please I do not need your paper card" policy.

The true storage costs for properly storing paper documents on low or unknown quality paper are actually quite high.

And when he gets around to scanning the older cards it will be a huge service if he can make them available on the interweb.

He must be saving a lot of them... otherwise why build the facility that started this thread.

It still gets my attention when I see QSL cards being round filled.

Tim,

I just checked your QRZ page for the first time. It shows over 314 million lookups. How did that happen? Have you been active from P5, or some other rare entity, before?  Grin
« Last Edit: December 02, 2017, 11:33:28 AM by VA3VF » Logged
WO7R
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« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2017, 07:04:32 AM »

Quote
The true storage costs for properly storing paper documents on low or unknown quality paper are actually quite high.

This is actually a more difficult question than it appears if you take it seriously.

Computer stuff "looks" eternal, but it is under constant threat.  Suppose you scan something like a QSL card, and thereby digitize it.  Now, what happens next?

It depends on the media you store it on.  The last definitive studies I could find on optical media, for CDs, suggested you could only count on a lifetime of 10 years.  You might not lose everything that fast, but you would likely lose some things.  And, depending on how robust your OS solution was, one error might kill the whole file instead of just the record or two that suffered damage.  For DVDs it would presumably be no better, probably worse.

As for spinning disks, then it's a question of whether or not you use RAID.  With RAID-ed media, then you have a pretty good surety as long as you replace the first failed media before the second one fails.  I have not looked into any of the various SSD/Flash cards, but they already have a limited set of writes from the get-go.  I have never heard the archival story for these, but the density alone suggests it will have, eventually, a degradation pattern similar to CDs.  Maybe there's a longer life there.  I'd have to check.  But, even if it is 10x better than spinning disks (which is about five years, typically), it would still have a finite chance of failing in a human liftime.

All of these computer-based means eventually require human attention.  When the humans stop paying attention, then the possibility of a lot or a little damage can happen with surprising speed, at least in terms of a single human lifetime.  One way or another, you need to keep recopying the data.

Paper, even bad old acid-based paper, by contrast, can be expected to last 150 years or so, provided you don't store your cards in direct sunlight.  Even a shoebox with a loose lid and pinholes here and there should be OK.  In terms of realistic lifetime and realistic need, that is actually plenty reliable for our needs.  It is doubtful that anyone will care about any of my QSL cards in 150 years.

Edit:  Did a quick google and found a paper that appears to be from those serious about archiving.  With the right media, it claims, optical storage (e.g. CDs) might be as high as 50 years.  That would not be off-the-shelf media from Walmart however.  Flash type memory, by contrast, is terrible.  Nobody should rely upon it for very long, maybe a couple of years according to this article anyway.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 07:24:01 AM by WO7R » Logged
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