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Author Topic: reasons some clubs fail.  (Read 71331 times)
AC4BB
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Posts: 116




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« on: July 09, 2016, 01:10:17 PM »

  I love the club ours just got wayyyyy  to political. when they stopped listening to common sense I quit them.
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AB4ZT
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Posts: 14




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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2016, 03:18:26 PM »

When you say "political", do you mean internal politics (like "company politics"), or do you mean they obsessed too much about "politics" politics.   They reason I ask is that a few years ago I decided to attend a local club meeting as a guest.  Talking to the president, he said "we talk radio, and 'other things'".  Warning. Warning. Danger Will Robinson.  Sure enough, talk devolved to highly partisan politics.  I never went back. 

73,

Richard, AB4ZT
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AC7CW
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Posts: 1011




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« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2016, 02:00:44 PM »

I got a club newsletter wherein the main editorial, written by the club president, was about how terrible the war in Iraq was. Not a word about radio in the article... I asked for my dues back and never got a reply. I was talking to the same guy about my original callsign, WV6IYL and he argued with me there had never been WV6 calls!! Outside of that one jerk it wasn't a bad club at all, they had some great events, not a lot of them but they were great... if you are sensitive and one jerk can put you off of something then a lot of clubs are going to be a problem I guess. I'm learning MBTI slowly, learning to understand that different people are wired differently. That makes it a lot easier to get along. It doesn't make everybody's behavior correct though.

How many clubs have a clubhouse with a workshop and test equipment? How many have interesting speakers every meeting? How many have a club station and a remote station for people that can't have their own? I'd think that a club's appeal to more people would increase the more they had to offer to all the different personality types and areas of interest, no?
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Novice 1958, 20WPM Extra now... (and get off my lawn)
KH6AQ
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Posts: 7718




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« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2016, 05:30:29 AM »

Club politics is why I have not joined a ham club in decades.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3536




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« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2016, 09:35:18 AM »

Clubs need to post "No politics allowed" signs!!  Roll Eyes
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LONESTRANGER
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Posts: 12




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« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2016, 04:19:23 PM »

Ours was obsessed with bylaws.  Spent the entire meeting once arguing over the meaning of ONE word in the bylaws.  Another problem was 90% obsession with D-Star, repeaters, Emcomm, etc.  Clubs not much use anymore, find some buds who enjoy the same operating as you and hang with them.
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KE4ZHN
Member

Posts: 174




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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2016, 02:20:47 PM »

Too many egomaniacs trying to run the club. That's what kills them all.
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N9LCD
Member

Posts: 293




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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2016, 06:41:15 PM »

Lack of term limits and failure to rotate officers and committee chairs.

After more than one bummer -- not necessarily in ham radio clubs -- I firmly subscribe to: One year to learn; One year to do; One year to teach or guide; and YOU'RE RETIRED!

If an organization can't find somebody to stepup and assume a leadership role, that's a good indication that the organization doesn't mean much to the membership.

N9LCD   
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K8PRG
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Posts: 305


WWW

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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2016, 12:15:05 PM »

I've been a ham almost two years now....joined a local club and has been a good one.
We own a repeater, several members have offered to help out with any problem I may have (ham related of course), we hold annual hamfest, field day, bus trip to Hamvention, we activiated a NPOA site.....of the 170 members, about 50 show up at monthly meeting.....no politics in sight...I'm lucky I guess.
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KK5DR
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Posts: 631


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« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2016, 08:29:33 AM »

Locally, nearly all the radio clubs in this area have almost no membership outreach. They spend very little time or effort on "growing" the membership base.
One of the main reasons is that the club meetings and events are BORING.
For young hams, there is very little interest in regular club activities, it's just too dry and boring.
Why is this happening?
I blame the "Old Guard", the old farts in control of the club. These geezers maintain control over club activities, and direct them. They like "Old School", boring old stuff.
They meet once a week, or month, and eat dinner, discuss the club budget, and then things get really boring. I've been there, seen an heard it, and never went back.
If you want young hams to join, and stay in the club, you must stimulate the mind.
The club should plan events. Not just field day, or a seasonal hamfest. The club must plan and execute club events in the public. Set up a ham station in the public park, put up signs inviting the public to come, ask questions, have a snack, get info in ham exam sessions.
My local club stopped holding exam sessions over ten years ago. I think the VE team just got lazy. I feel there should be sessions held 4 times a years, come one, come all. It's better than nothing. I digress.
A public, active presence in the community, interesting lectures and demos, youth outreach and training young hams, these are what is needed to have a viable club with involved and active membership.
My Canadian ham friend describes his club meetings to me. They have all age groups, all classes of licenses, nearly full meeting sessions each week. They have demos and lectures on interesting subjects by expert members. They train all members to use the club station, which allows members that don't have their own gear to get on the air. They do public demos of ham radio, and try to answer questions asked by the public.

So, if you want a ham club that is growing and interesting to new members, the old geezers must give up the "stick in the mud" control, and get busy growing, or get busy dying...
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AB3TH
Member

Posts: 194




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« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2016, 12:05:57 PM »

There are two clubs 15 minutes away and lots of them if I want to drive 45 minutes, which I don't.  I joined one of the closer ones.  Never got anything by email announcing meetings, events or membership renewal.  I let it drop.  The other club, I sent an email asking if they wanted to go along with donating a set of ARRL books to the local library.  I offered to pay half.  The library has virtually nothing for kids or adults who might be interested.  Hardly any science books at all.  No music.  Lots of DVDs.  I never heard anything back from that club.  I wouldn't mind being involved in some club but there seems to be no interest on their part.
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SOFAR
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Posts: 986




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« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2016, 02:03:57 PM »

There are two clubs 15 minutes away and lots of them if I want to drive 45 minutes, which I don't.  I joined one of the closer ones.  Never got anything by email announcing meetings, events or membership renewal.  I let it drop.  The other club, I sent an email asking if they wanted to go along with donating a set of ARRL books to the local library.  I offered to pay half.  The library has virtually nothing for kids or adults who might be interested.  Hardly any science books at all.  No music.  Lots of DVDs.  I never heard anything back from that club.  I wouldn't mind being involved in some club but there seems to be no interest on their part.

Most clubs have the meeting dates and events calender on their website. Can't fault the club for not sending you email updates.
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AB3TH
Member

Posts: 194




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« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2016, 03:34:58 PM »


Most clubs have the meeting dates and events calender on their website. Can't fault the club for not sending you email updates.

I wasn't expecting one every month or anything.  Maybe just a 'welcome to the club' message.  I went to a field day, signed up and mailed them a check.  They cashed it.  Never heard anything again.  I wasn't on their membership list on the website.  Nothing.  That indicates a lack of interest and competence on their end.  There are other clubs.  I'll find one that's worth my time.
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ONAIR
Member

Posts: 3536




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« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2016, 06:42:06 PM »


Most clubs have the meeting dates and events calender on their website. Can't fault the club for not sending you email updates.

I wasn't expecting one every month or anything.  Maybe just a 'welcome to the club' message.  I went to a field day, signed up and mailed them a check.  They cashed it.  Never heard anything again.  I wasn't on their membership list on the website.  Nothing.  That indicates a lack of interest and competence on their end.  There are other clubs.  I'll find one that's worth my time.
   Not even on their list?  I think you should ask them for a refund.
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WB0CJB
Member

Posts: 133




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« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2016, 05:57:14 AM »

Yes many clubs have boring meetings and do not draw the younger people in. A lot of times you will find that in any club 10% of the club will end up doing 90% of the work, be it a hamfest, FD, bike race or whatever. Most would rather sit and socialize at the meetings.

People have other interests and a lot of them have families whose school age activities take up a lot of time. Those who are still able to work don't have the time to commit to club activities. So the retirees are usually the ones who end up doing the work.

How do you get the older generation to embrace the technology that drives the young generation? If a club wants to get more younger members then it has to keep abreast of the latest advances. If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

No matter what a club's interest is, being radio, trains, quilting or whatever that club will be hard pressed to attract new blood because of the myriad of activities and obligations that a person of the younger generation has.
« Last Edit: October 02, 2016, 07:10:30 PM by WB0CJB » Logged
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