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Author Topic: reasons some clubs fail.  (Read 71607 times)
DU7DVE
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Posts: 322




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« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2016, 02:55:57 PM »

Too many egomaniacs trying to run the club. That's what kills them all.

That's what happens with our club too. Our president and his lackeys just want to be communicators for parades and think that this is amateur activity. No other "real" amateur activity.
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SHORTWIRE
Member

Posts: 109




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« Reply #16 on: December 02, 2016, 06:34:08 PM »

If an older ham buys an IC-7300 or even IC-7610 they set the radio up with the use of a computer and then don't learn the different features. If a younger ham buys the same radio and needs help they get the "deer in the headlights" look when they ask another member for help. So the new ham or new member stops attending the meetings because all they see are a bunch of old men socializing about their medical ailments or they claim they're too busy being retired.

New hams who are not The Right Sort or Willing To Make An Effort bears most of the blame..

Many new Retarded EmCommies Marginally Motivated Hams expects the old ones to do all the work for them and being spoon-fed everything. I.E. A Waste of Air…

Amateur Radio is, or should be, a technical hobby for people with Inquiring Minds.
Many of the new ones just want to be a High Visibility Idiot or, at most, a C*ntester.  Angry
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EJTDS
Member

Posts: 1




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« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2016, 08:45:27 PM »

When i was a 16 year old Novice i went to the local club and took my 1st dx card to show a friend who was there. Well a "older" member saw my card and told me that qsl cards don't mean anything and i should just shove the card up my Rear End. I never went back to that club or any club.
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NK7Z
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Posts: 1846


WWW

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« Reply #18 on: December 03, 2016, 09:10:35 PM »

One learns so much just tuning an old Novice transmitter, building a dipole, using xtals to get on frequency...  The new hams miss that entire experience, and it is a shame...
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Thanks,
Dave
For reviews and setups see: http://www.nk7z.net
AB1OC
Member

Posts: 90




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« Reply #19 on: December 09, 2016, 01:53:02 PM »

I have read all of the posts in this thread a couple of times now. As background, the club that I am involved in has brought on over 50 new members in less than 2 years. I believe that there are plenty of younger folks out there who want to become Amateur Radio folks and many of them are turning out to be great Amateurs. What this takes is a commitment on the part of a club and its leadership to do two things 1) make opportunities to younger folks to get involved in the hobby and have active programs to develop and teach amateur radio skills and 2) be welcoming of younger people and their ideas and different approaches to things.

This takes some work on the part of a club but it is not that difficult and the rewards are tremendous. We have had a hand in getting almost 30 people into the hobby this past year and I have to say that this is by far and away the most enjoyable part of my entire Amateur Radio experience. It has also given the more Sr. folks in our club a real shot in the arm in terms of their participation and commitment to the Amateur Radio service.

For those who may not have had a good experience with a club I would say don't give up! Joining an active Amateur Radio Club that matches your interests can make a huge positive difference for you and your experience with Amateur Radio. There are many great clubs out there and its worth a few tries to find one that you enjoy and one where you can make some friends and learn about Amateur Radio.

- Fred, AB1OC
  President, Nashua Area Radio Club
  Visit us at http://n1fd.org
« Last Edit: December 09, 2016, 01:58:47 PM by AB1OC » Logged
W7TX
Member

Posts: 19




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« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2016, 07:48:30 PM »

When i was a 16 year old Novice i went to the local club and took my 1st dx card to show a friend who was there. Well a "older" member saw my card and told me that qsl cards don't mean anything and i should just shove the card up my Rear End. I never went back to that club or any club.

I don't blame you.  I went to a club meeting in my town in 1993 and got promptly ignored, then called a bootlegger because some 2 bit moron looked up my call in the callbook and didn't see my call.  I recently moved here and changed my call from an 8 to a 7. This was pre-internet and callbooks were out of date the day they were printed.  Didn't matter that I was advanced class and licensed in 1978.  I was shunned on the repeater, talked about behind my back, told to quit tying up the repeater when I did find a qso, etc.  They lost out on 23 years of my dues and their repeaters are mostly unused now. So now I am done with all Amateur radio clubs, I don't need them and they don't need me, and I don't need the aggravation. Same with repeaters.
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KI7AAR
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Posts: 88




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« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2016, 09:30:40 AM »

I'm losing interest in my club because all they ever talk about is the club repeaters.  They now have three repeaters on VHF and UHF (one is digital) and they were under utilized when we had two. I understand the import of repeaters but, they are really quite boring when hardly anyone uses them.

I really like to hear more about HF, station building, working DX, etc.  It's been months since I've even turned on the HT. HF is fun and rewarding, working repeaters is not.  I guess it's been months since attending a club meeting too.
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AB1OC
Member

Posts: 90




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« Reply #22 on: December 16, 2016, 05:48:33 PM »

Different clubs often have different centers of interest. Sometimes a good experience can come down to finding a club whose members are interested in similar things that you are. You might also talk with the folks at the club you are in now and see if you could work with them to add some new areas to their focus.

The club that I am in has a long history of HF and Field Day operation. Lately we've add new focus on VHF/UHF (Satellites and DATV initially), on Fox Hunting, and on Homebrewing. Broadening out the focus areas of your club is one of the keys to getting it to attract and retain new members I think.

73,

Fred (AB1OC)
President, Nashua Area Radio Club
http://n1fd.org
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AB1OC
Member

Posts: 90




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« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2016, 07:16:51 AM »

WB0CJB is right about many things. Families are very stressed and pulled in many directions these days. The good news is that there are many great parents who want the best for their kids. Its important to understand this and work to make a positive difference in the family's lives through amateur radio. This means its more than just about getting people into your club.

Some time back, we put together a program in our club to help bring new people into our hobby. More recently, we've sharpened our focus on introducing younger people to STEM careers and learning through amateur radio. We still have much work to do but our early progress in getting young people interested in amateur radio has been good.

We are working on a video to share with other clubs on what we've been doing. Take a look at let us know what everyone thinks.

https://vimeo.com/196586640

Fred, AB1OC
President, Nashua Area Radio Club
http://n1fd.org
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AB1OC
Member

Posts: 90




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« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2016, 04:55:38 PM »

Sorry everyone, I think there might have been some problems accessing the video in the previous post. These should be resolved now and we would welcome your comments or suggestions.

73,

Fred, AB1OC
President, Nashua Area Radio Club
http://n1fd.org
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KD8YGW
Member

Posts: 42




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« Reply #25 on: February 16, 2017, 09:56:16 AM »

I've been a ham almost two years now....joined a local club and has been a good one.
We own a repeater, several members have offered to help out with any problem I may have (ham related of course), we hold annual hamfest, field day, bus trip to Hamvention, we activiated a NPOA site.....of the 170 members, about 50 show up at monthly meeting.....no politics in sight...I'm lucky I guess.
Sounds like USECA. I'm in that one too and my experience is the same as yours.
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K6CPO
Member

Posts: 405




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« Reply #26 on: February 16, 2017, 12:24:48 PM »

Lack of term limits and failure to rotate officers and committee chairs.

After more than one bummer -- not necessarily in ham radio clubs -- I firmly subscribe to: One year to learn; One year to do; One year to teach or guide; and YOU'RE RETIRED!

If an organization can't find somebody to stepup and assume a leadership role, that's a good indication that the organization doesn't mean much to the membership.

N9LCD   

All well and good, but if no one steps up to do the job it doesn't work.

I'm starting my 5th year as President of a club in the San Diego area and the only reason I got the job in the first place is because nobody else was interested.  My predecessor served one year before stepping down due to health reasons and his predecessor served at least six years before "retiring." 

At Field Day last year, we had five or six people sign up to operate, which was pretty typical for us.  When Field Day actually arrived we had a total of four people at the site, only two of which were actually operating.  Pretty discouraging...  We're trying to stimulate more interest, but most of our members either work or go to school (or both.) 

As long as I'm President, I and my fellow board members will continue to stimulate interest, but I really don't know how to increase interest.
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K1CJS
Member

Posts: 6252




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« Reply #27 on: February 17, 2017, 10:21:08 AM »

All too many clubs have a core membership that run everything--but they don't run for or hold office.  Those members just 'control' the club one way or another.  The other members know that they hold the reins and depend on them for the existence of the club. 

Anytime a new member (or group of new members) come in with new ideas and those ideas aren't taken favorably by the powers that be, those powers just express their displeasure, and the new members (or group) is forced right out the door sooner or later by the membership at large--the 'sheep' that always follow the leader.

The exception is when the new members/group is powerful or big enough to "take over" the club--a drawn out process that amounts to what is being called politics.  A good, steady club in my area was taken over just that way by out of towners who joined, a few at a time, and amassed enough power to push the older, long time members out of their niche.

Sometimes, just walking out IS the best answer to the so called problem.
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AB1OC
Member

Posts: 90




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« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2017, 02:17:30 PM »

I think having new and different activities for club members to do helps a lot. Consider putting together a kit build. Do a SOTA activation. Put together a balloon project with a local school. Get a crew together and help some put up a new antenna for someone. Try something different at your next field day (we added a satellite station and an ATV setup last time and both were hits). Consider putting together a team to enter a contest or to help with a special event. There are lots of options. Once you try a few, you'll pretty quickly find out what gets your members excited.

The other thing that has worked well for us is to really focus on bringing new and especially young people into Amateur Radio. For those of your who are concerned about changing club momentum in a positive way, this is a great approach to take. Check out the HAM Nation video on our home page (http://n1fd.org) for some more ideas on how you can go about this.

Our club was a somewhat of a turn around situation a few years back. We've been doing these sorts of things for about 2 years now. In that time we have almost tripled our membership to over 135 folks. The hardest part of all of this is getting started.

All you really need is two or three members who are committed to these kinds of things to get the ball rolling. This is especially true if you focus on the new and young HAM idea. We are finding that lots of people really want to get into Amateur Radio. All they need is for someone who is a HAM to reach out to them, help them to get licensed, and then most importantly - help them to get on the air and to get active in the hobby.

- Fred AB1OC
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N9LCD
Member

Posts: 293




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« Reply #29 on: February 19, 2017, 05:33:04 PM »

I USED TO belong to a club in the '90's.  I was a dues paying member, helped man the club's table at Fests and even drove members to & from fests.

One day I get a call from the club president.  "Can you drive a couple of our members out to the Fest next Sunday?"

"No."

"Why?"

"Sunday's the wife's birthday."

"The Fest is only Sunday. You can have her birthday some other day."

My response wouldn't pass the moderator's review.

My wife supports me in my radio interests & pursuits.  She encourages and helps me.

What the **** does the club do for me?

ABSOLUTELY NOTHING!

 Angry

N9LCD
 
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